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Music is structured sound - while it usually has meter, there's no need for music to have time signature or tempo markings to exist. Time signature is just a tool to help everyone involved in the music making process. The best practice is to choose the one that most simplifies your music thoughts. For example: The composer chooses the time signature to ...


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Dom is absolutely correct on the musical end. My question is more concerned upon technique and common/good practice, thanks though! :) From a best practices standpoint, I would say the 70bpm setting is the correct one. If you are just composing in the software, nothing else, it wouldn't matter. If you want to start syncing to drum machine plugins, ...


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Tempo and Time Signatures really don't have anything to do with each other. A time signature is how you group, count, and accent beats and tempo is how fast the beat is. Changing the tempo as you are doing does not affect the time signature at all. 3/4 or 3/8 or even 3/2 will group the beats in the ONE-two-three pattern you want and as a composer the tempo ...


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There really isn't a difference. Its just notational protocol that make the music easier for the reader to interpret and conceptualize. 3/4 time designates that each measure gets 3 quarter note beats. 6/8 time designates that each measure gets 6 eighth note beats. 4/4 time designates that each measure gets 4 quarter note beats. 8/8 time designates ...


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Well, you could write that as (3+3+3+4)/4, indicating a fixed cycle, but time signature can change during a piece as well, in which case you could just indicate the changes. I do believe that such meter is fairly uncommon in popular music, as it leads to a cycle of 13 units. In 20th Century 'Classical' music this kind of things are quite a bit more common, ...


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2/4 and 2/2 are principally about the same. As a performer however, I tend to have different feelings about them. Starting from the "standard" 4/4 with its alternating strong/weak accents, 2/4 has not-really-alternating strong/strong accents on the half notes while 2/2 feels more like leaving off an accent on the second half note as compared to 4/4. So as ...


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One way to look at the difference between 2/2 and 2/4 is to start from the assumption that someone meant something by the choice, and back out what they could have meant. After all, if it really didn't matter, we wouldn't waste time with a notation that discerns the difference. I would start by looking at the difference between 2/4 and 4/4. At the most ...



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