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19

Time signatures and bars are not there arbitrarily, nor just to help count your way through a piece. They are there to provide guidance on the rhythm of the piece. Where it is accented, where it breathes. Some composers do write pieces with no time signature or bars, as an indication that there should be no consistent rhythm. Eric Satie did this for several ...


2

A nice example of a composer playing with the written vs sounding time signature is the second movement of Ravel's G Major Piano Concerto. It is written in 3/4 and sounds like it's a slow waltz in the left hand, but the left hand isn't playing a normal 3/4 waltz rhythm — it is playing eight-notes putting the pulse on beat 1 on the second eighth note of beat ...


-1

Back a few hundred years, it was common for music to insert a bar or two of 3/4 into a basically 4/4 piece (or vice versa). Often two parts would effectively be in different time signatures. The term for this is hemiola. Wikipedia describes this far better than I can: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemiola


1

Simple test for you to try. Take 'Frere Jacques', a well known song. Re-write it in 3 time.Ask a player to play it. Chances are that it will sound very different. That's because the emphasis in a song comes on the first note of a bar.Particularly notable when words are involved ! In 4 this is every 4, in 3, every 3.It also puts the 'main' notes in different ...


19

Your understanding of the math, as it were, is correct. And I would say yes, a multiple of 4 bars of music in 3/4 can be expressed as music in 4/4 (in a multiple of 3 bars), but I would dispute that the same can necessarily be represented as such. The bar line placement of a piece of music has tremendous impact upon live musicians' interpretation of, not to ...


1

What are you are referring to is called harmonic stress. It is the metrical stress accorded to a pulse based on its position within a grouping. It should be noted that, while sometimes musical performers add accentuation to notes or chords occurring on strong harmonic stresses, this is not always the rule. The strength of the beat is actually not a function ...


0

The time signature has no bearing on whether a beat may be accented or not. Accents on the weak part of the beat can happen regardless of the time signature. This happens often and is called syncopation.


0

What is the connection between time-signature, beat, and tempo? Mainly time-signature and tempo. Tempo is beats-per-minute I know, but does the time-signature affect it? Time Signature tells us how many beats there is in a bar and what each beat consists of. Tempo is an indication on how fast or slowly the peace is to be played The beat is the ...


0

I would be curious as to see a real life example as to why this would happen. Time signatures at there core tell you how many beats there is in a bar and also what each beat consists of. When you take 3/4 time. It tells you in essence that we have three beats of crotchets. If you would take this and make a compound time signature you would basically put a ...


1

Think of 9/8 like this: 3/8 + 3/8 + 3/8 So therefore 9/8 is basically a combination of 3 8th-note triplets. If you want the original triplets, you will have to go for 16th-note triplets for each of the 9 8th notes.


2

Without knowing the score it seems to me that this is a case of interchangeable metres/time signatures rather than alternating metres. Eight note triplets in 3/4 could be equated with ordinary eights in 9/8. Thus can the two time signatures be seen as interchangeable (using three beats per bar). And the dual time signature can make the writing of the score ...


5

The question has already been answered correctly by Lee and Dom, but I would like to add some pictures as clarification... I don't have an example right now from an actual piece, though I'm quite sure I've seen something similar. Anyway, it's not hard to come up with your own examples, so here's one which shouldn't even sound that odd: This should at ...


6

Two time signatures indicates alternation back and forth between the two. It's just shorthand for writing a new time sig at the start of every bar. The second sig is usually in parentheses, so, for example, 3/4(6/8) would have a bar of 3/4, then a bar of 6/8, then a bar of 3/4, etc. That exact example is from the "America" song from Bernstein's West Side ...


0

On the assumption that each bar is as long as any other, the 3/4 will be a 'straight' feel, while the 9/8 bars will feel more 'swingy'. As in 3/4 the quavers will count as ONE-and-TWO-and-THREE-and-.,while the 9/8 bars will feel ONE-trip-let-TWO-trip-let-THREE-trip-let-, with 1.2 and 3 all being counted in the same timing. Another way to annotate it would be ...


-1

Presumably the piece is in triple time with three triplets per quarter note. One way of notating this is 3/4 (three quarter notes per bar), one way is 9/8 (three triplets per quarter note = nine triplets per bar).


1

I suspect that there might be some confusion in the question. As I see things, 6/8 is a way of notating a 2/4 rhythm whilst showing that there is a triplet beat; 9/8 is a way of notating 3/4. I came to this backwards, hearing songs which I considered to be in 12/8 then discovering that they were notated in 4/4. One can count songs both ways as the rhythm ...


6

Lee is right, but there is a simpler way to think of triplets. Typically we break notes up into sets of 2 (or duples). For example, two half notes make a whole note, two quarter notes make a half notes, two eighth notes make a quarter note etc. All a triplet is is putting 3 notes where 2 normally go. So 3 eighth note triplets will always equal a quarter ...


6

I think triplets are always 2/3 of the duration of the 3 notes regardless of the meter indicated by the time signature. So a triplet of quarter notes will take up the space of a half note (or two quarter notes). A triplet of eighth notes will take up the space of a quarter note (or two eighth notes). ...and so on. I pulled up some useful links in ...


1

"x over y" is an expression used in music, and in mathematics. The time signature can be thought mathematically as x * 1 / y, for example, 4 * 1 / 4. I wouldn't worry too much about it looking mathematical, personally, since when used in context it will be correctly understood, and not confusing in a musical context. What are you doing in inline text, ...


4

In plain text you can use the vertical bar symbol | (aka pipe) instead of /. It's a very common character, so your keyboard should have an easy way to type it. It would look like this: 4|4. You can check the list of Unicode characters and search for other characters that might be used instead of /, like ⧘ ⦙ ⬍, there's a lot of them (some have mathematical ...


5

The only reason not to use a slash is that it implies division. But it's the closest match to standard notation and the symbol there looks even more like division. You're trying to reproduce what standard notation does, so use / That / will be the least of your learners' worries. I'd say the numbers themselves will be more worrisome. Triple meter? Have ...


0

Listening to the consistent beat, I don't hear anything other than 4/4! | ; 2 3 4 | 5 6 7 8 | ; 2 3 4 | 5 6 7 8 | 9_9 ; 2 | 3 4 5 6 | 7 8 1 2 | 3 4 5 6 | I think the lyric might be throwing you off. Kind of like a stroop effect for the ears. When he sing's "9", it occupies two beats, that is why he cannot sing "7 8" at the end (because he's still in 4/4 ...


0

To count out complex time signatures you need to figure out what part is repeating. For eg. in your case if the same thing repeats after what you have specified then the time signature at that point of the song would be 8+9+8+6+8+9+8+5/8 = 61/8 or 61/4 (whatever the case may be). Also different parts of a song can have different time signatures. But you ...


2

This could be a compound tempo. Assuming the last bars are correctly written (see my question in comment) than for the first line you would have: 6/8+1/4 | 9/8 | 6/8+1/4 | 6/8, and for the second line you would have: 6/8+1/4 | 9/8 | 6/8+1/4 | 3/8+1/4 How to find this from the piece itself? Well you either have a very good sense of rhythm and you can ...



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