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1

Even in cases where you can figure out the time signature (there are cases where you can't), the part is not supposed to be a puzzle. It's supposed to make things as clear as possible to the player. Key signatures can often change so it's good to be reminded at every line what the current key signature is. Sometimes, on lead sheets of simple tunes that ...


4

The time signature cannot be figured out from the content since both 2/2 and 4/4 have a whole note all-in-all but have different accents and drive. It's even worse with 6/8 and 3/4. The repetition of the key signature is just a visual reminder since the key signature pervades a piece. If you start the piece from the second page, it would be really awkward ...


1

Sure, you can generally discover the time after a few bars. But why not know it BEFORE the first note? It will make more sense of the conductor's upbeat when sight-playing, if nothing else. There's a "fake book" style where after the first line not only time signature but also key signature and clef are omitted. It's not helpful, particularly in e.g. a ...


3

My understanding so far has been that 4/8 is faster because it is probably assumed that a crotchet is conventionally always at 80 tempo (unless mentioned) and hence a semi-crotchet is played at 40 tempo as convention and hence the bar is played much faster. Your conclusion is faulty. It is a widely held misconception in music. There is no inherent ...


1

In summary, is it right to say that If I set the tempo of crotchet = 80 for my first bar semi-crotchet = 80 for my second bar. Is it equivalent to saying 2 4/4 bars instead of 4/4 and 4/8 right? In general, if two time signatures have the same denominator (the bottom number), that means that the "beats" corresponding to the bottom number are at ...


5

What I mean by that is that, I can always play this bar faster by adding a notation like pianissimo or a fortissimo above the bar. Almost. Pianissimo and fortissimo are dynamics. They relate to the loudness (also called "intensity") of the music. But there are other words to use for speed. You could simply write "faster" or "slower." There are all kinds of ...


1

It sounds as if you have conceived a song that doesn't fit the standard pop song format of 8 or 16 bar sections, with the same bar length throughout. That's fine. Plenty of songs don't. Stop trying to force your song into a rigid structure and find out just what it DOES do. Maybe there are 7, 9 or 13-bar sections. Maybe some bars have 4 beats, some ...


0

Start counting at the first heavy beat, and keep counting till you reach the next heavy beat. It may not be apparent straight away, but when you think you have the magic number, count through the song. If it fits, you've most likely solved it. You may have to try with a slow and a fast count, as some time sigs are compound, like this one It could be a slow 4,...


14

Technically speaking, you can't ever say for certain until you see the original score (if there even is one) as determined by the composer; a piece could literally be written in an infinite number of time signatures. As such, we have to make these decisions based on a knowledge of prior practice and on what makes the most practical sense. So, let's look at ...


8

I'd put it in 6/8, due to the triplets feel, but the phrasing kind of repeats every two bars, thus two lots of 3/8, making 6/8. Why /8? Well, it's fairly quick, so I'd write it as quavers instead of crotchets. There is a recent question on that subject - quavers to play give the feeling that they are quicker - I know it depends on the tempo mark, but ...


0

That's exactly what you have to do. Some versions go 3,3,3,3, 3,3,3,4. This goes 3,3,3,4 3,3,3,4. Some songs change frequently, but there's no other simple way to write it out.Actually it's not complicated to write, or read, as the changes are on 4/4 and the next 3/4 bar.


1

It's not so unusual to have time signature changes back and forth in several different kinds of music, and writing in the time signature at the beginnin of a new measure when it changes is the only way I've ever seen it notated. For example, both The Ocean by Led Zeppelin and March of Pigs by Nine Inch Nails go back and forth between 7/8 and 4/4 and are ...


0

Determining a piece's time signature isn't only a matter of counting up the beats, it's also about how to notate a piece so it has logical rhythmic units. Time signature is something that's (1) set by the composer, and (2) for the convenience of musicians who will read and perform the piece. So there are pieces that can be written in more than one way, and ...



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