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6 | V ^ ^ v ^ ^ | 8 | 1 2 3 4 5 6 | 6/8 compound time can be thought of as duple meter consisting of two beats to the measure, where the dotted quarter note gets the beat. 6/8 is just a notational simplification -- if Carl Orff's time signatures had caught on we might call this time signature 2/q. (a two on top of a dotted quarter note). I consider an ...


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You have guessed correctly. The correct musical term for groups of three notes with a three on top is called a Triplet And such irregular type of rhythmic notation is called a tuplet. Anyway, in the case of triplets, three notes will equal the time of two notes. meaning if there are three eight notes then they will take the time of two eighth notes in ...


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In a way six eighth beats equals three quarter beats (at the same tempo one measure in each time signature would take the same amount of time to play), but you must ask why a composer would choose one time signature over the other. It really depends on the composition of the measures. 6/8 literally means "six eighth notes" while 3/4 literally means "three ...


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You can't do this algorithmically -- or I really mean to say you shouldn't. But as a musician and arranger, there are infinite possibilities to take some material and rework it into a different format. To the specific example of "Take Five", consider the 5/4 rhythm groove: 5 | 1 2 3 4 5 | 4 | e e - e e - q q | For me, I answer the question ...


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At the risk of getting slated for extending the subject :-) Look at the 5th bar of the melody. The bar in 10/8 time. This works beautifully IF you take notice of the tempo indication, dotted quarter = 50. If, however, you choose too fast a tempo (as many do) it becomes an awkward oddity and you'll probably give up on it and slip back into 12/8. And, all ...



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