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0

That's exactly what you have to do. Some versions go 3,3,3,3, 3,3,3,4. This goes 3,3,3,4 3,3,3,4. Some songs change frequently, but there's no other simple way to write it out.Actually it's not complicated to write, or read, as the changes are on 4/4 and the next 3/4 bar.


1

It's not so unusual to have time signature changes back and forth in several different kinds of music, and writing in the time signature at the beginnin of a new measure when it changes is the only way I've ever seen it notated. For example, both The Ocean by Led Zeppelin and March of Pigs by Nine Inch Nails go back and forth between 7/8 and 4/4 and are ...


0

Determining a piece's time signature isn't only a matter of counting up the beats, it's also about how to notate a piece so it has logical rhythmic units. Time signature is something that's (1) set by the composer, and (2) for the convenience of musicians who will read and perform the piece. So there are pieces that can be written in more than one way, and ...


0

While tab is a good way to convey the specific notes played in a passage it is not great at getting timing across and as such should be taken with a large grain of salt. Some tab conventions are better than others but if you are trying to learn a specif passage you still need to listen to the original and get to know it to work out which notes are crucial ...


9

In the context of Baroque dance music or suites, then there are good reasons to use 3/8 in preference of 3/4 (or vice versa). In the days before metronomes, how the music was notated would be an indication of performance speed. The notation would also be specific to a particular dance. I have borrowed diagrams from Jan van Biezen, who has written ...


1

My answer is that it has to do with feel. I heard a concert where the conductor changed from 4/4 to 3/8 quietly he counted "one and two" that implies 3/8 eighths while a 3/4 has : one and two and three and, from this you feel the difference, and the difference is quite big.


-1

Consider you're walking up the stairs. You could have a lot of small steps or just a handful of huge steps. As you walk up the steps, somebody is trying to match your movements with the drum in front of them. So maybe it only takes two huge steps to get to the top of your staircase, or to the end of the phrase or the song. What if you have four steps, ...


0

I suggest that you play the last bar of the first song, then immediately play the introduction of the second. If there isn't an introduction, use the last two or four bars of that song. Don't over-think this. They don't want a gap, but they ARE two different songs, in different tempos. At some point the music will have to change. Just do it!


1

In a musical score bars begin to be counted at 1, there is no "measure 0". The first note of a piece is said to be in beat 1 of measure 1 (well, not when you have anacrusis, but that's not the issue here). So if you wish to have consistency with the music notation convention I would say your friend is right, but you should change the caption to "Tapping bar ...


0

When trying to find out the time signature, the first thing you do is try to find a strong beat. This beat is often the loudest or something significant will happen on the beat. Next, you count the rest of the beats in a bar before the next bar starts, so if you count 3 beats it might be in 3/4, or it might be in 4/4 if you count 4 beats ect. Additionally, ...



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