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13

This will just be an embellishment of @user15077’s answer. This is the beginning of your piece as you’ve notated it: Here is what it would look like with a more standard approach: As you can see, many of the notes are expressed as tied notes now. For example, the quarter-note D-sharp in the first measure is written as a sixteenth tied to a dotted ...


9

Let's just pick the first bar apart which is pretty much a mess. I'll write down the note durations as fractions: 3/8 1/16 1/4 9/16 (bar line after 5/16 of that, the 5/16 written as 1/4~1/16). This does not look as much like "composing" as it looks like "let the notation program break the mess across bars and fix this up in the next measure". If this ...


2

A simple basic rule, not always followed, is that 4/4 bars can be split in the middle. It does make life easier for the people who have to read the dots, although good sight readers don't have a problem.We're not all GOOD sight readers, though... Shev's point about 4/4 is one that you need to address. In the early stages of writing, it's probably a good idea ...


3

If you need a two-bar count, the one I'm used to is just a-1, 2, 3, 2, 2, 3 (can also be used for 6/8, depending on tempo) [the first 'a' giving the 'swing, last triplet' pickup if the piece swings, otherwise it's left out.]


0

I came up with mostly 4/4, what seems like two four-bar phrases, however the last bar of the first phrase appears to have five beats instead of four. Thus I counted: 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 That's assuming something of an allegro tempo with straightforward 16th note rhythms.


0

Papers on Horogram Rhythms can be found at http://anaphoria.com/hrgm.PDF and at http://www.anaphoria.com/horo2.pdf with a discussion of a possibly better algorithm by Viggo Brun at http://anaphoria.com/ViggoRhythm.pdf You use horograms to algorithmically generate long rhythmic and scalar patterns using the Golden Ratio (Phi). Horagrams are diagrams ...


4

Each of these can be thought of as a conversion factor. Typically, you're converting everything to or from beats (which are the basic unit of time in music). If you recall "dimensional analysis" from high-school physics, this is a great place to use it! Time signature numerator = beats/bar Time signature denominator = beats/whole-note (i.e. what division ...


4

Another question and answer give answers for any beat type and tempo, but for the examples above, it depends upon which note length beat is 120 bpm. For instance, a crotchet bpm of 120 (as would probably be used in 4/4), will always give a crotchet length of 0.5 seconds, whole-note length of 2 seconds, half-note length of 1 second, and so on. If, on the ...


2

It depends. The BPM is telling you the tempo based on a reference. If it is 4/4 then it is most likely this: This pretty much means that there are 120 quarter notes a minute so each quater note would be a half second long. If you wanted to know how many half notes there are in a minute it is just simple math. Since there is two quarter notes in every half ...


7

To find the length in seconds of each beat for any given metronome marking in beats-per-minute (bpm), you would divide 60 (the number of seconds in a minute) by the bpm marking. For instance, if a piece has a metronome marking of crotchet (quarter-note) = 120, each crotchet beat is 0.5 seconds long (60/120). You can follow this simple rule to find the ...


6

A whole note takes up a full measure in 16/16, 8/8, 4/4, and 2/2 time only. A whole note has the value of 4 quarter notes or 2 half notes. Since how common 4/4 time is (it is even also referred to as common time) it makes sense that the notes name line up with the use in 4/4. In 3/2 the whole measure is represented by a dotted whole note (i.e. a whole note ...


9

A bar's duration can be represented using the whole note No, not always! This is the incorrect assumption you're making. A bar's 'duration' depends on the time signature. So, in a standard 4/4 bar, the bar is 4 quarter notes long. (4 * 1/4...see where this is going?) Alternatively, in a 3/2 bar, the bar is 3 half notes long, or 3 * 1/2! So, whilst a ...


0

It is not difficult. In simple time you have a certain number of regular beats. You can have beats of minims. You can have beats of crotchets. You can have beats of quavers. When a time signature becomes compound its beats become dotted notes. So for instance 3/4 time is simple triple time. 9/8 is compound triple time. You went from three beats of crotchets ...



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