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5

Alfred Brendel was notorious for having his fingers bandaged when playing. I've read several contradictory justifications for this, but the most credible, attributed to a personal interview, is that his fingernails broke easily and he had to protect them like this: (I found this picture on the web, it is not attributed and I have no assurance that it is a ...


3

Calluses do have an effect, but nothing that can't be overcome. In fact, most professional pianists have calluses, and many string players with heavy calluses also play piano without issues. Some even say that the firmer contact points help control the gradations of pressure in key strokes. The main negative effect is that the callused fingertips are ...


2

Can't believe all this about calloused fingertips caused by playing guitar. It's not necessary. But in any case, I play both, don't have callouses ( I play bass guitar as well), but do not believe that callouses will affect piano touch. It's how you address the keys rather than the feel of the fingers on ivory/ebony. Do not be concerned at all.


2

They could have meant 'tone' or 'musicality'. So, as you say in your comment, you can be 'technically perfect', hitting all the right notes at the right time, but perhaps not 'feeling' the music. Also like you say in your question, listening to great recordings is a good way of hearing good musicality and tone! However whether you like someone's specific ...


1

The range of expression that a human voice is capable of never fails to surprise me. Whether it's Bulgarian deep-throated singing, German lieder, or Korean opera. What you will be able to achieve with your voice will depend upon a couple of things: Physiology - Some people have wider throats, and thicker vocal chords. They're just made that way. The idea of ...



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