Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Unlikely, because unless your child has a genetic reason for being unable to distinguish pitches (which you apparently may, if what you say is true), he or she will soon learn to identify the inaccuracies in your singing. For example, there has been some noise about bilingual families and a fear that the non-native parent will "infect" the child with bad ...


6

You should pay attention to your singing. Tone-deafness is a result of a disconnection between what are you hear and what you produce. It is generally fixable through conscious attention. I work developing musical training computer games for children. My mother sang to me as a child, and she is tone-deaf. I also learned to sing in a tone deaf manner. We ...


4

It may be, genetically, that your child has inherited your amusicality. You won't know for a while. In fact, if only you listen to it, then you'll never know! Children tend to believe that their parents are inscrutable, so your out of tune singing may be acceptable as the right way to your child. This will then oppose renditions by others, giving a bit of a ...


2

I think a very safe answer is that interacting with your child is much more important than worrying about unknown risks linked to parental tone deafness. Give and take, have a conversation, sing, smile, dance to the beat of music, and don't hold back - add rich emotional dynamics with your face while you interact with your child. Make sure the musical ...


1

It occurs to me in reading all the answers posted so far (by well meaning members of the community offering what they perceive to be useful advice) that the ONLY answer that seems correct is: We don't actually know how singing dissonant off pitch musical phrases to an infant during the very early stages of language development might affect their future ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible