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9

Unlikely, because unless your child has a genetic reason for being unable to distinguish pitches (which you apparently may, if what you say is true), he or she will soon learn to identify the inaccuracies in your singing. For example, there has been some noise about bilingual families and a fear that the non-native parent will "infect" the child with bad ...


6

You are probably using the wrong equipment to get a good amplified sound from your acoustic guitar. 1) You can't get a good sound by running an acoustic guitar through an amp designed for an electric guitar. Amps designed for electric guitar are designed to color the sound and add distortion (by very subtle amounts or in the extreme) and they do not ...


6

You should pay attention to your singing. Tone-deafness is a result of a disconnection between what are you hear and what you produce. It is generally fixable through conscious attention. I work developing musical training computer games for children. My mother sang to me as a child, and she is tone-deaf. I also learned to sing in a tone deaf manner. We ...


6

In addition to the points given by topo morto: the effect that gives you pretty much “overdrive without the distortion” is a compressor. In fact, a major reason for using overdrive and distortion is that it compresses the signal (yielding longer sustain), as well as changing the sound by adding harmonics and intermodulation. If you simply run a ...


5

The dirt and grime that comes from distortion is a result of notes with frequency relationships beyond those that are very simple ratios (e.g. 2:1=an octave, and 3:2=a fifth) going through the distortion process together. This results in sum and difference frequencies being produced that seem only distantly related to the notes being played, resulting in an ...


4

Do you think B.B. King's guitar sound is anything like Stevie Ray Vaughan's? They're both labeled as "blues". Do you think Jimmy Page's guitar sound is anything like Brian May's? They're both labeled as "classic rock". Do you think Randy Rhoads's guitar sound is anything like Dimebag Darrell's? They're both labeled as "metal". Forget about comparing ...


4

Electric guitar amps are not intended to faithfully reproduce the sound of the electric guitar, but to shape it and give it a new sound entirely. Alot of people will buy their electric guitar amp on the basis that they feel it gives them the sound they're looking for. As for amplifying acoustic guitar, that's not quite the case because the whole thing about ...


4

It may be, genetically, that your child has inherited your amusicality. You won't know for a while. In fact, if only you listen to it, then you'll never know! Children tend to believe that their parents are inscrutable, so your out of tune singing may be acceptable as the right way to your child. This will then oppose renditions by others, giving a bit of a ...


4

There is a good article here; Signal To Noise: The Sonic Diary Of The Smashing Pumpkins. To summarise the key points: Amp: Early-80s Marshall JCM-800 2203 (KT88 tubes) through 1960A cabinets Pedals: Corgan achieved Siamese Dream’s highly stylized tone with a litany of DOD pedals and a ’70s-era, silver-faced Big Muff Pi Guitar: As the guitar ...


4

Two contrary ways to do this is: Don't use much distortion, if any, and just use medium gain with overdrive Use a metal pedal that doesn't require too much gain: simple square wave distortion can be quite clean But you will need to provide the effect with a clean input, so no barre chords or open chords. Just stick to thirds and fifths, which sound ...


4

Remember the rubber band guitar you made out of a shoebox when you were a kid? When you plucked the rubber band string, the walls of the shoebox got pulled inward from the rising tension of the rubber band. The same thing happens when you pluck a guitar string. As it is pulled and vibrating, the tension increases. As that tension increases, it causes the ...


3

This isn't a stupid question at all and I think you should be able to get this sound with the amp you have. My first suggestion is try using less distortion. The intro to My God Is The Sun sounds barely distorted at all to me. I had a Peavy bandit 112 (the transtube series one) so I would suggest using the lead channel set to vintage mode. Set the low, mid ...


3

I'd advocate reading the instructions !! Yes, it's tedious, but you'll find out how to tell the effects what sort of amps you're putting them through, which way you want to route the signals, which order you would like the effects to be affected by the pedals, and other important stuff. As they're sophisticated these days, in comparison to a little single ...


2

There are in fact acoustic guitar amps out there that you can buy for this purpose. If you have the money to spend on it, I would definitely recommend that. Other than that, regular amps are okay for acoustic guitar, although you'll find that the sound is not ideal this way. Additionally, acoustic guitar amps use notch filters to prevent feedback, which is ...


2

The eq settings on the amp are usually close to the same on Rock and other styles. Metal can go to extremes by cutting mids. The mids usually are more in control of the overall tone. I usually have Bass - 7, Mid - 6, Treble -7 for Classic Rock and Blues. Play a chord and let it sustain while turning one knob up and down to hear the difference. If you were ...


2

tweak your reverb and lower your attack. also teak your phaser: low feedback low depth one third rate (hz) half Upper (hz) if you have a tube amp, move it to sound more warm. play it more like single note guitar solo instead of chords or strumming. Bend the note a bit here and there ! have fun !


2

The sounds in the songs you've listed are actually pretty different to my ears, but I'll try to generalize and go through some examples. Here is the raw line for reference. This is a modified strat with an EMG-SA in the neck position. This is important because EMG is an active pickup so the signal level is higher. This means it will distort sooner. So keep ...


2

I think a very safe answer is that interacting with your child is much more important than worrying about unknown risks linked to parental tone deafness. Give and take, have a conversation, sing, smile, dance to the beat of music, and don't hold back - add rich emotional dynamics with your face while you interact with your child. Make sure the musical ...


2

To answer one of the sub-questions: The way you'd do it with an AD30, or other 2-channel amp, is to set one of the channels as distorted, the other as clean and then use the foot switch to toggle between them. One of the aspects that you have to finesse in this approach is achieving the desired relative overall volume between the two channels while ...


1

My suggestion would be a combination of: noise suppressor pedal, and preamp overdrive pedal I'm a huge Malmsteen fan, so what I use (with either my signature YJM stratocaster or my Squier stratocaster) is: BOSS NS-2 Noise Suppressor Yngwie J. Malmsteen YJM308 Preamp Overdrive by DOD (extra link) Here is a short video(5 MB) where Yngwie explains the ...


1

It occurs to me in reading all the answers posted so far (by well meaning members of the community offering what they perceive to be useful advice) that the ONLY answer that seems correct is: We don't actually know how singing dissonant off pitch musical phrases to an infant during the very early stages of language development might affect their future ...


1

Firstly, a pedal is nothing more than a preamplifier. A guitar amplifier also has a preamplifier. Both can produce distortion, and, at low volumes, this distortion is amplified more or less cleanly by the amplifier's power amp. The difference is that the pedal doesn't have the same tone as the pre-amp in the guitar amp. Furthermore, most pedals are simply ...


1

a lot of amps have two channels where you can set one for rhythm, and the other for lead, with a foot switch to flip between the two. It looks like the AD30 has that setup ? How you set the channels is up to you, of course. However there are other factors. Let's say you have your rhythm amp sound as clean with a little bit of 'crunch', and your lead sound ...


1

First of all, an acoustic guitar can sound odd through an amplifier that is designed for electric guitars. So that might be your first problem. For your electric guitars, make sure that your effect chain is set up correctly. There are plenty of tutorials on Google and on Youtube on how to do that. However, if all effects are turned off and your electric ...


1

Typically you already have mids prominent when you play through an amp as electric guitar amps respond more in the mid range than the low or high range. A lot of mids when you're using distortion will make the sound "muddy", which people like for some stuff. I use a BOSS GE-7 equalizer as a clean volume boost and also to shape my tone. I usually have it ...


1

Yes, it's okay, no big difference. Actually, you only need pre-amp, equalizer, and a reverb. But, if you're playing in a big gig show, soundhole cover is needed to avoid the feedback, but in some case that your acoustic guitar already have notch filter or feedback reducer, it's fine not to attach soundhole cover. I always play my acoustic through electric ...


1

Being tone deaf is a myth usually propagated by inferior teachers. If a teacher tells you or a person you know that he cannot do music because he is tone deaf then it speak less about the persons music ability and more to the teachers inability. It is often symptomatic of teachers who do not want to go the extra mile for pupils who struggle. I have seen ...



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