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Listen to as many good bass trombonists as you can. I recommend listening to Martin van den Berg playing Saturday Night. Here's the link:


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In terms of the physical acoustics a good reference point to start at is to consider a very long (effectively infinite) chain of pressure pulses/waves of fixed shape that repeat identically at some fixed repetition interval. In terms of the spectral content, this means that there are a set of narrow spectral peaks all at integer multiples of the fundamental ...


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It does affect the sound, but by how much is debatable and I doubt anyone could reliably discern between a trumpet with or without this kind of bracing in a blind listening test. The main thing it does is affect the way the instrument resonates. When you play a brass instrument, you set up a vibration in the air stream inside the tubing. Some of this ...


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When it comes down to it, every decision regarding the construction of an instrument will have some effect on the instrument's own distinctive timbre. With that said, there will probably always be some point of diminishing returns where these changes in the design don't make any noticeable difference. Notice that above I said "distinctive timbre," and not ...


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Thicker picks, in and of themselves, do not produce a darker sound. What happens is that thicker picks allow for a more rounded shape which releases a string smoothly, which has the effect of exciting fewer harmonics. You can sharpen a thick pick, which will produce a brighter sound. Thin picks cannot be made dull. That is to say, they cannot be made more ...



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