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14

I highly recommend interval training. I was essentially tone-deaf before starting interval training, and now have no problem recognizing notes and playing songs by ear. It provides a major advantage because you only need to figure out one note of the song. The next note can always be identified if you can recognize its interval from the previous note! I ...


13

For transcribing music, one does not need "perfect" pitch, just "good enough" pitch. And practice. If you can identify chords or harmony progression, a very common set of chords will be I, IV and V (so for the key of C major, those would be C, F & G). One thing you'll need to memorize is the circle of fifths (and how to fill out, or derive, a scale from ...


11

The more music theory you know and understand, the more quickly you'll recognize common patterns and be able to transcribe them accurately. In addition, you can use software that slows the music down without changing its pitch. I've used both Capo and Amazing Slow Downer, and both work well for this purpose. In addition to slowing down the music, they ...


11

Simply put, no. If you limit a song to single pure tones, it's pretty easy to write software to recgonize them and transcribe it. But once you get to a real instrument things get much harder. Even single notes can be difficult to recognize due to overtones -- the dominant frequency doesn't even need to be the fundamental frequency, which makes it very ...


7

First of all, learning just basic music theory is a must. I don't know what your background is but if you're unable to read a piece of music it's likely you're going to have difficulty writing it. Learning how chords work is a must. Not only recognizing what they look like but if someone plays one on a piano or something you can recognize that its a major ...


6

What you're talking about is a transcription service. However, these can be expensive, and the ones I found on a quick Google are geared towards musicians who want to put music or tabs on their own websites. Paying someone to make what's essentially sheet music of a song you don't own (I assume this is not music you own the rights to) brings up all sorts of ...


6

Here's the music theory behind what you are trying to do. The traditional hymnal arrangement of "Holy, Holy, Holy" can be played on piano or organ, but it is really a chorale arrangement. It is choir music, designed to be sung in four parts: soprano, alto, tenor and bass. When a pianist plays it, she is actually just playing the notes from the four vocal ...


5

I'm not a Drummer, but I would highly recommend investing in a copy of Guitar Pro. Most of the songs I've downloaded for guitar pro have the transcribers really putting a ton of effort into transcriptions of songs. It allows you to follow along, speed up, slow down, loop etc, and the Real Sound Engine means that the drums actually sound realistic. A ...


4

Learning intervals have a part to play. However, personally, I feel that by the time you analyzed the intervals, the music would have gone far, far ahead in real time....unless you have already memorized the tune and are playing it back from what you have heard; or you are rewinding over and over again just to listen to the relevant parts. For me, having ...


4

I think you'd get different answers depending on who you ask, so this may yet be closed as being too subjective. Even the same composer may start at a different 'point' depending on the ideas they have at that moment in time. For example, if they heard someone whistling an interesting melody in the street that day, then they may develop that melody first ...


3

If there were no specific techniques for beginning a composition, composition would likely not be a field of study. Often within composition study, the teacher will provide a set of guidelines that essentially tell you how to start. I am assuming that you are not working with a teacher here, which of course is the "real-world" case, and give you the ...


3

This is a good question as transpositions notoriously trip people up. First off, Wagner's not playing any tricks, and you've got the right octave, so rest easy. :) The "normal" Bb clarinet's lowest written note is E2 which will sound as you described one whole-step lower than written pitch (D2.) The A clarinet has the same written range as the Bb ...


3

Neuratron PhotoScore is the best tool for doing what you want. Put the sheet music on a scanner, feed the scans into PhotoScore, and it uses OCR (Optical Character Recognition) to convert it to digital music notation which it can then play back using software MIDI instrument sounds. It's not perfect, and to use it effectively, you need to know how to ...


3

The easiest way for me, if I can't get the chords right off, is to start by holding a tuner up to a speaker, to see which notes/chords comprise the progression. Then I usually turn off the music and work as much out as a I can from memory. Finally, I turn it back on and play along with it, listening for the more subtle chord formations hinted at by leads ...


2

How to Play a Tune by Ear on Piano A. Work out the basic tune. Pick a tune. Start with simple tunes that use one to three primary chords (I, IV, V) Work it out in the key of C – Everything is easier in C. You can always transpose it later. Begin by playing the C major scale to get the sound of the key in your ear. Find the home note – Sing the song ...


2

There is no route: song => sheet music But there are routes song => human "translator" => midi file => sheet music There are tons and tons of "midi files" all over the internet. You only need to search Running up that hill midi (that one's by Kate Bush, I'm not sure that's the same as the Placebo version) Synthesia can display sheet music ...


2

For most songs it's more trouble than it's worth when not impossible. If you only want the piano section for this song, it might be possible, but there's not one app that will do this. You first need to find a midi version of the song instead of wav or mp3 and a midi player that will let you turn off channels (vocals, bass, drums, etc) then save the ...


2

I know choirs whose members use Finale Reader which is a free program that can display and play music from Finale or MusicXML files. Obviously it requires the piece you are learning to be in Finale or MusicXML.


2

In addition to Alexander Troup's answer, I'll confirm that Guitar Pro 6 displays the drum track in a "standard" notation (using the Berklee notation). Using this software, you'll be able to open a lot of tabs from the Internet (more or less accurate), you can find them on a lot of websites, like on Ultimate-Guitar. If you don't want to buy a software, you ...


1

You're unlikely to find poor-quality transcriptions published simply because transcriptions are done in drafts - much like a painter sketching through a painting. The accuracy of one person's sketches are of another fully-completed painting - much like an art forger - are either convincing or they're not. The best obviously fool everyone. In order to ...


1

I play in two bands and we continualy struggle to get sheet music for drums that is acurate and technicaly correct. Agree Guitar Pro is awsome but expensive and some (not many) of the sheets are badly put together for drums. Our sucsesses have been from two sources Amazon in the sheet music section but can be expensive most books only give 8 or 9 sheets and ...


1

This isn't exactly what you were thinking of, but one way you could do it would be to get a lot of free midi files and render them into audio. Then, check the resulting score against the original midi. I'm not sure about the methods you are using to do this, but you could automate the entire process. For example, FluidSynth can render audio files from the ...


1

I think this is the starting point for most song writers. The challenge for orchestral works is simply the number of parts, but if you get used to writing (or recording yourself singing if you can't write a score) each one you will get better at transcribing more than one part at a time. Just keep running through it and comparing your output with what you ...


1

Putting aside legality, which is a very valid issue in itself, there are a number of ways that you can get the music (or listener's interpretations of the music) for certain songs you want to play. (For Guitarists mainly, but applicable to all musicians) Tabs. You can take the tab and convert it back into the music notes (if you are a non-guitarist, using ...


1

I'm sorry to say that websites such as you request are often run illegal. When you reproduce a work that is copyrighted you have to have the permission from the authors, which they often* don't have. I would advise you to start to transcribe yourself. It's much more rewarding. *I've NEVER encountered one that had.


1

First. Get fluent with chords. If you are fluent with chords then you can play along using chords with any piece of music. Second. Play out the tune. Third. Play out the tune. Add the chords Third. Improvise to get your piece the same as the piece you are imitating. (Or improvise to your liking)



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