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29

A free alternative to Transcribe, which allows you to do tons of other things too like removing vocals, is Audacity.


24

I wasn't there, but I would not find it completely out of the question. In every field of expertise, experts are capable of chunking information in ways that amateurs are not. An expert listener will not just hear a few hundred notes performed by several voices, they will hear harmonies, their relationships to each other, and rhythmical patterns. More ...


22

Neuroscience still can't explain some of the amazing things human brains can do. A person alive in our time has interesting and similar ability to mentally manage music in a way that suggests that some people might be wired for this sort of thing. The study detailed at http://www.radiolab.org/story/148670-4-track-mind/ showed that Bob Milne has the ability ...


20

It's worth noting that the Miserere is extremely repetitive. For example, this version is roughly 15 minutes long, but you get all the melodic and harmonic content in the first 2:45 except for the final cadence; everything after that is more verses set to the same music. Mozart still would have had to remember the varying text overlay as well as any ...


17

Transcribe helps you slow down the tempo whilst retaining the pitch. It also has other useful features for transcribing, such as placing bookmarks for sections, measures, and beats, and an equalizer for isolating instruments. It can also show which tones are being played, which works OK with some tweaking of the filters. Another important feature is that ...


16

I highly recommend interval training. I was essentially tone-deaf before starting interval training, and now have no problem recognizing notes and playing songs by ear. It provides a major advantage because you only need to figure out one note of the song. The next note can always be identified if you can recognize its interval from the previous note! I ...


15

For transcribing music, one does not need "perfect" pitch, just "good enough" pitch. And practice. If you can identify chords or harmony progression, a very common set of chords will be I, IV and V (so for the key of C major, those would be C, F & G). One thing you'll need to memorize is the circle of fifths (and how to fill out, or derive, a scale from ...


15

Simply put, no. If you limit a song to single pure tones, it's pretty easy to write software to recgonize them and transcribe it. But once you get to a real instrument things get much harder. Even single notes can be difficult to recognize due to overtones -- the dominant frequency doesn't even need to be the fundamental frequency, which makes it very ...


15

Great question! I just happen to have the Prelude on my desk at the moment - you've got a really interesting project on your hands there, but quite a lot of work - good luck! Hopefully I can add to jjmusicnotes really useful advice with some ideas that will make this a far simpler project for you. Firstly, from your question, it seems like you are ...


15

There are a few different ways to approach transcription and depending on how good your ear is and how much detail you want to put into your transcription. It also should be noted that like practicing an instrument, you get better at transcribing by doing it. In general, you would need the following: A recording of the song to be transcribed Manuscript ...


14

Capo (only for Mac) is visually appealing and wonderfully easy to use. In addition to slowing music down without affecting pitch, it also uses frequency analysis to make educated guesses at the notes being played, which can speed up the transcription process tremendously.


13

The more music theory you know and understand, the more quickly you'll recognize common patterns and be able to transcribe them accurately. In addition, you can use software that slows the music down without changing its pitch. I've used both Capo and Amazing Slow Downer, and both work well for this purpose. In addition to slowing down the music, they ...


13

All documented resources I can find agree with the story. The Pope, instead of excommunicating Mozart, conferred on him the Order of the Golden Spur, a papal knighthood, for "contributing to the glory of the Church" through his transcription of the Miserere. The record of that award, as well as the minutes of that audience, are part of the archives of the ...


12

How about 2/2 (alla breve)? This also goes in two, but the pulse is a half-note so you can write your 32nds as 16ths, which should be readable. Nowadays alla breve is also usually associated with a quick tempo so to an experienced musician it should look right.


10

Transcribing in its simplest form could be construed as listening to a piece and writing it down for others to play. It may be as simple as making a note of the chord changes and writing them; doing the same, but putting them into a different key; doing it as you listen to a piece for the first time. At a deeper level, it's changing a piece of music. It may ...


9

All transcribed notation is an approximation. The classic dots and stems are simply not adequate for many types of music. But before we even talk about transcription, consider that many composers have conceived of sounds that are far beyond the status quo -- often called the avant garde, but not necessarily so. Many of these composers have then invented ...


8

First of all, learning just basic music theory is a must. I don't know what your background is but if you're unable to read a piece of music it's likely you're going to have difficulty writing it. Learning how chords work is a must. Not only recognizing what they look like but if someone plays one on a piano or something you can recognize that its a major ...


8

Unfortunately, the answer to your question is one that you can only ultimately provide. Orchestration is an art form unto itself, and your choices are personal and unique to your sense of nuance and knowledge of the music. For example, a particular melody or line given to a cornet will sound differently if given to the flugelhorn instead; though the same ...


7

What you're talking about is a transcription service. However, these can be expensive, and the ones I found on a quick Google are geared towards musicians who want to put music or tabs on their own websites. Paying someone to make what's essentially sheet music of a song you don't own (I assume this is not music you own the rights to) brings up all sorts of ...


7

I always use Audacity for transcribing music. It's a free audio editor (for Mac and Windows). If necessary you can change the tempo, and you have a lot of other useful options. However, I've been transcribing music for many years and I've come to the conclusion that in most cases you just need to be able to select the difficult bit and be able to loop it ...


7

Transcribing music is an incredibly educational process and is wonderful ear-training for aural development. Especially as a beginner, it is important to begin with a wide scope, and gradually narrow the focus to eliminate otherwise distracting information. Often, beginning musicians are overwhelmed with all of the aural information, and so the model I ...


6

Here's the music theory behind what you are trying to do. The traditional hymnal arrangement of "Holy, Holy, Holy" can be played on piano or organ, but it is really a chorale arrangement. It is choir music, designed to be sung in four parts: soprano, alto, tenor and bass. When a pianist plays it, she is actually just playing the notes from the four vocal ...


6

I think you'd get different answers depending on who you ask, so this may yet be closed as being too subjective. Even the same composer may start at a different 'point' depending on the ideas they have at that moment in time. For example, if they heard someone whistling an interesting melody in the street that day, then they may develop that melody first ...


6

I'm not a Drummer, but I would highly recommend investing in a copy of Guitar Pro. Most of the songs I've downloaded for guitar pro have the transcribers really putting a ton of effort into transcriptions of songs. It allows you to follow along, speed up, slow down, loop etc, and the Real Sound Engine means that the drums actually sound realistic. A ...


6

One thing transcribing will teach is an excellent musical ear - identifying intervals, chords, rhythm, etc. As well as the converse - being able to hear written music in your head better. This will aid you in many areas of music.


6

I agree with what microtherion says: Most professional classical pianists who practice pieces during all their lives end up remembering an outstanding succession of notes and rhythm and this is mostly due to patterns (physical, visual, melodic, etc.) that help organize and make sense of what they recall. If you were to present a professionally trained ...


5

If there were no specific techniques for beginning a composition, composition would likely not be a field of study. Often within composition study, the teacher will provide a set of guidelines that essentially tell you how to start. I am assuming that you are not working with a teacher here, which of course is the "real-world" case, and give you the ...


5

I was going to leave a comment, but it turned out to be too long; I'll answer, but this is mostly advice based on what I think you're trying to do (as I think it's a great idea!): Signal processing Not trivial... especially if you want an application to be 'real time'. This answer on Signal Processing.SE gives some interesting feedback as to how frequency ...


4

Learning intervals have a part to play. However, personally, I feel that by the time you analyzed the intervals, the music would have gone far, far ahead in real time....unless you have already memorized the tune and are playing it back from what you have heard; or you are rewinding over and over again just to listen to the relevant parts. For me, having ...



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