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5

As Ulf mentioned, the main problem is likely to be condensation. If it has been in a cold vehicle and then moved to a warm room condensation is likely to form. This in itself isn't generally a problem, as it will evaporate again once the amp and components warm up to room temperature, but if you turn the amp on before the condensation is gone you can easily ...


5

Not only are pianos heavier than you probably think - but also the weight distribution is uneven. They are difficult objects to move safely. This is what professionals do: The piano is transported to the truck using a dolly - that is a flat trolley with big strong castors. For a grand piano, the legs get removed and the piano is balanced on its side. ...


4

I assume you are talking about a grand piano. It is possible to snap the legs off when pushing it, if a caster gets stuck. It is rare that it happens, but you definitely want to make sure it NEVER happens to an instrument that weighs 300 pounds and costs $10,000 (or $100,000). When professional movers move a piano from one side of a room to another, ...


3

This is maybe not exactly an answer to your question, but still: I once left my GK bass combo in a truck in -30°C (-22°F) over night (in Finland). When I took it in and turned it on the next morning there was a loud bang with a flash, and it went dead. It was a chip that exploded, supposedly from a short circuit caused by moisture. I shouldn't have left it ...


1

My personal experience is with a violin, not a piano. However, since both instruments are made of wood and metal strings, there are some parallels, so my answer should still be useful. With a wooden instrument, cold alone will not cause damage. It may cause the piano to go out of tune while the temperature is different, and it may not completely recover ...



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