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Kudos for expanding your musical horizons by learning the guitar. I find it to be one of the most versatile musical instruments available. A capo is not required to play a song on guitar in any key you desire but will make it much easier to play in certain keys. The way a guitar and similar fretted stringed instruments are set up makes it difficult to ...


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I'm guessing since you mention sessions and whistles that your major focus is on Irish or Scottish music. With a D whistle you'd be playing mostly in D and G, I think you'll find the best results to capo 3 and play in G positions for Bb (equivalent of D in a D whistle) and stay on capo 3 and play in C position for Eb (equivalent of playing in G on a D ...


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You could also tune the guitar down a half step to get the Natural open Bb / Eb and Ab. Some of the open chords may be different then but it is an option.


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Adding to Dave's answer, specifically playing along with a Bb instrument, *capo 1st fret, use 'open' A, D and E, or E7. *capo 3rd fret, use 'open' G, C and D, or D7. *capo 6th fret, use 'open' E, A and B7. Slight problems for a beginner would be - in the first case, F#m, Bm and C#m. In the second - Bm, and the third - F#m, G#m and C#m, as all those ...


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For guitar players the keys E, A, D, G, C (and relative minors/modes) are considered "easy" keys -- the common, beginer open chords fall in these keys. And especially for acoustic guitars, the ringing of open strings in these keys is a part of the guitar's tonal quality, and is desireable for some styles of music. So what do you do when you want to play in ...


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A guitar in standard tuning is actually a good fit for the key of G major (E minor) since the you can take advantage of some basic open chords in the key of G major which are G(I), Am(ii), C(IV), D(V), and Em(vi) as shown below: G Am C D Em If you were to put a capo on the 2nd fret you would be able to use the same shapes to make the same relative ...


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If you continue to progress, you'll soon run into parts written in other transpositions, and thus will learn to "re-think" the meaning of tone names. It's not that different from learning to read "concert pitch" in bass, tenor, alto, and treble clefs. So I agree that the answer is "all of the above,... and then some" :-). Typically a discussion of ...


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Most players think and speak in the written key, in my experience. However, they DO need to be aware that when discussing with other musos, that most others will probably be in 'concert'. Imagine an alto sax player communicating with a tenor and a pianist... So, Yes to 1, 2 and 3! As an aside, it would be interesting and useful for you to attempt to read ...



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