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1

I suggest doing it by means of Finale and Sibelius. Also Musescore is useful, but... If You're not acquainted with the programs, You may and will have troubles with any of them. This is why, You shouldn't do't by Yourself, just order scores and get it back in PDF, print them and play flute or else. I suggest this service: ...


3

E♭ is three semitones above C. So you should put the capo on the third fret. Some of the other answers are quite thorough, but it is really a simple answer!


1

I think I know exactly what you mean, so I will just give a simple answer in case you are confused by the others (but I highly recommend studying them, anyway). The answer is to place the capo over the 3rd fret. This makes your "C Chord shape" (what you would play to get a C chord should there be no capo at all) be an Eb chord. Thus, you can easily ...


2

Simple, completely effective answer: For Eb, don't use a capo. Rather, lower the tuning of each string. Re-tune the strings, low to high, Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Bb, Eb. Then play the regular chord shapes that you already know.


2

I think the other answers are good, but wanted to condense the most important bit into one answer. You just have to count the semitones. Here are all the notes, and the number of semitones they are away from A. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A A Bb B C Db D Eb E F Gb G Ab A D is five semitones up from ...


6

Although your question is a little ambiguous, I'm guessing that you want to play music written in Eb, using chords in C, but keeping the music sounding in Eb. So, you put the capo on fret 3 and rewrite all your chords three semitones lower. However, just giving you this answer won't help you understand how to work out where to put a capo should you need to ...


9

This depends upon what you mean by "music is in the key of…" and "I want to play it in the key of…". If you mean that you want to play chords written in the key of C and have them sound in the key of Eb, put the capo on fret 3. Eb is three semitones higher than C (C-C#-D-Eb). (This seems likely.) If you want to play chords written in the key of Eb and have ...


0

Vocalist should have 17 notes in the range of their chest voice 13 are needed to make a clean octave, that leaves 4 half steps. You do need to accommodate them. However you also should be able to move up to an additional whole step beyond what they're asking to stay in sane scales for everyone else (i.e. C,F,Bb,Eb,Ab,G).


2

Ok I've figured out an easy way to do this! So here are the notes I'm playing: B, A#, G#, F#, F, D# C# There are two semitone steps here: A# to B and F to F#. So to play on the white keys, A# and F must map to a white key that has no black key to its immediate right. So, via trial and error, you can first map F to E and if that doesn't work you can map it ...


2

Here is a chart for you: from G flat or F sharp major go up or down 6 half-steps. from F major go down five half-steps, or up 7. from E major down four half-steps, or up 8. from E flat major down three 1/2 steps, or up 9. from D major down two 1/2 steps, or up 10. from D flat major down one half-step, or up 11. from B major up one half-step, or down 11. ...


4

The buttons Pressing the # key once will move the transposition up half a step (from a white key to a black key, or between two white keys that don't have a black key between them). So from C to E: C#, D, D#, E, that's 4 steps. Quickly recognising the transposition required From the question, it looks like you know about scales and keys. So you probably ...



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