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To add to alephzero's notes on the clarinet, I'm pretty sure Adolphe Sax designed his set of instruments so a musician could easily switch from clarinet to sax and back. As it happens, there is a "C-melody sax" in rare use as well. Now to the question of key signature: The resonances and timbres of keyed instruments depend on the bore and the bottom note ...


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The clarinet is different from almost every other wind instrument because it overblows at the twelfth, not at the octave. Therefore, the notes to cover the "break" between the lowest octave and a fifth are technically more difficult, especially on early clarinets with a limited number of finger-keys. The orchestral use of B flat and A clarinets dates from ...


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You may very well find yourself having to arrange the piece, rather than transpose/transcribe it. As @guidot notes, the range of the instruments differ not only in locus, but in width - the 'cello has a wider easily-usable range than the flute, as well as being lower. That being said, there are few things that might need to be considered: You should look ...


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It will depend on the range of the piece in question, but a simple way would be to take the highest line away from the bass clef and put an extra one at the bottom. Either mentally of by re-writing. This would put every note into a treble clef situation, and be simple to do. And hopefully simple to read. The only problem then, is, as I say, the range may not ...


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I just wanted to add polychords fall into these same transposition answers that @awe, @slim, and @Tim succinctly provided. The usual dead giveaway of a polychord is the chord type specified in the notation (not just a bass note Bmin/E). The reason I bring this up is because the slash notation is used as well for them. For a polychord you actually are ...



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