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11

Ok, let's clear up some confusion. First: The guitar is a transposing instrument. It sounds one octave below written pitch. Second: The guitar is a "C instrument". What this means is that the guitarist reads "C", they play "C", and we all hear "C". Regardless of the tuning of the individual strings, this fact still applies. In music, with respect to ...


4

Yes, this is--sort of--how it works. I've never seen an actual classical score which calls for a detuned guitar, but if you look at transcriptions of rock and blues, they'll write the music "in C" (i.e., as if the guitar were tuned to the most common pitch level of the tuning it's in) and then tell the player that the music will sound some interval lower or ...


7

Transposing instruments are so due to convention, not by a technical property. The main advantage is, that different instruments of the same family can share the same mapping of note->fingering and so makes it easier for the player to switch instruments. The disadvantage is, that the sheet music has to be adapted to exactly the instrument used and therefore ...


20

There are two concepts and ideas that happen in music which, when combined, explain why this happens. The first is that the way certain instruments are constructed affects what sounds they can produce. The E♭ alto saxophone, the B♭ clarinet, and the horn in F each can easily play in the key designated. Typically, when learning to play these ...



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