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4

Getting a promoter for each country should help you a lot - they know the right venues, the contacts etc. - but it is not necessary. I have known people who just went on the road and took what they could find, but you are rarely likely to find the most suitable gigs at that sort of short notice. If you have your music on iTunes, Amazon or other global ...


3

I doubt this will be an issue, but there are plenty of ways to connect your guitar to an mobile phone. I'm guessing the electric violin outputs the same signal, so it can be used in a guitar amplifier. If so, you could use one of those together with your smartphone, and some sort of sound will be produced. Or even simpler, use one of those portable practice ...


3

The same string choice compromises apply with a travel guitar as with any other guitar. How does string gauge affect a guitar's sound and playability? So you need to choose. For loudness: heavier strings For ease of fretting: lighter strings For resistance to accidental bending: heavier strings For ease of bending: lighter strings If the purpose of ...


3

Depending on the airline you are flying, you can always look up the baggage allowances online. For instance Continental Airlines in the United States lists that they allow passengers to carry on a guitar. I highly recommend never checking a musical instrument. You never know how it could be handled when not in your care. I'm glad to see you're not ...


2

One awesome instrument for travelers is the ukulele. Recently I heard an interview with a Belgian artist who says that it is the only instrument she takes with her when traveling. You can play chords on it (handy to sing along with or write music), and she said it even fits in her purse. :-)


2

I've never done this before -- my one time taking an instrument during travel, it was a POS acoustic I cared nearly nothing about -- but when I see musicians talk about short-trip travel, they tend to bring an instrument and a pedalboard and rent a back-line. I'd look into renting a DJ rig rather than travelling with your own.


2

I asked my friends on Facebook too and got several recommendations for miniature amplifiers like the Roland Micro Cube the irig (though I don't use an iPhone) or the Amplug but then one friend pointed out that headphones suffice to demonstrate the difference between the electric violin turned off and the electric violin turned on and many of us ...


2

This security change in Airport exists because they fear that the batteries might have been replaced by explosives or that the device might be a fake one, so they ask you to switch on your electronic device in order to check that it's a real battery and a "real" working device. Moreover, the targeted devices are mostly phones, tablets and laptops (I even ...


2

For a few dollars more, you could consider the Martin Backpacker. Here is a video comparison of the Washburn Travel guitar and the Martin Backpacker.


1

I've been heavily researching the category of travel guitars which has included looking into the policies of all the major airlines (which has involved interviews of gate personnel and flight attendants) as well as the dimensions of some of the more popular choices. I travel 2 out of every 5 weeks. First of all, in its semi hard-shell case, the Washburn ...


1

I agree with @Reina that you shouldn't check a musical instrument. In fact, for entertainment purposes please read the story behind Dave Caroll's United Breaks Guitars.



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