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10

There are a couple of things you can do; raise the action of the strings; this might not be ideal for you. So the better option is to lower the height of your pickups; most pickups are height adjustable using the screws on either side of them. Ensure you have identified the correct screws before attempting this, and go slow don't try and force the screws. ...


8

It is not too ambitious, guitars are simple creatures and it takes quite some effort to do any permanent damage (namely excessive truss rod adjustment). Basically you slacken the strings then tighten the claw screws till the bridge is held hard up against the body and will stay that way when string tension is reapplied. You don't need to slacken the ...


7

A friend of mine had a guitar like this, and it wasn't too bad. One of the main bummers was that finding strings for the thing was pretty tricky. If you have to have special strings for the guitar, you have a lot less selection of strings and the different tones that different brands can provide, which is kind of a bummer. On the plus side though, the ...


7

A synchronised tremolo is a tremolo system that 'moves' the bridge and the tailpiece, rather than, for example, a Bigsby, that only 'moves' the tailpiece. Because a synchronised trem moves the bridge and the tailpiece, it can not only affect the string tension but also the actual string length. For this reason, it provides a greater range on pitch change, ...


7

Yes, this is related to your tremolo--assuming you have a floating one (I haven't seen this problem on a non-floating trem). As you bend, the bridge moves as the tension on the string is increased. You could fix this by increasing the counterforce on your tremolo, and how you do this depends on they type of tremolo you have.


7

Yes, it will exacerbate detuning issues, sure, but a good quality tremolo combined with a locking nut will minimise this. The main problems come from the movement of the string beyond the nut if you don't have some way to lock it, and slackening or stretching the strings. Ways to minimise the issue: Get a good quality tremolo Use a locking nut, or if ...


6

The nut material can make a big difference, as can the width of the slots. Binding can occur because the slots are too tight. As @Bill said, you can use graphite. You can use powered teflon. I have been known to pop the string out of the slot and fold a piece of very fine sand-paper into a V and slide it through the slot once or twice, then retrying the ...


5

It certainly can, but the impact it will have on your tuning depends on a lot of factors: How old your strings are What type and weight strings you use How solid your tuners are -- locking tuners will stay in tune better How deep you're dipping the whammy bar; big dive-bombs will put you out of tune faster How well you've stretched/broken in your strings ...


5

I can see from your photographs that your guitar is so far out of its proper adjustment that the easiest way to fix it would be to take it to a professional guitar repair person and pay them for a setup. That way you know that the job will be done right. The biggest problem is the bridge. But beyond that, the repair person will also adjust the tension on ...


4

I don't believe that they are individually replaceable. I think you will have to order a complete replacement tremolo. See this site, which says: The knife edges of the trem become worn or damaged and require filing to get back to a proper knife edge. This is also rarely seen on Edge variants [except Edge3!] and some "mating" of the parts is ...


4

First, unscrew the the locking nuts. Now tune your instrument the usual way. Second, screw again the locking nuts and use the tuning keys located on the Floyd Rose to fine tune. Never use the standard tuning keys (i.e. the ones that are located on the headstock) while the strings are blocked or you'll get trouble! :)


4

Due to the difference in total string tension, you will have to reconfigure the springs in the bridge so that it floats in the same position as it does now, so that your action and intonation is unaffected by the string change. This could take as little as a change in the angle in one or two strings, by moving them from different hooks on the anchor plate, ...


4

If you want to fix the bridge, there are two simple ways: Replace it with a locking bridge - my Hohner G3T has one of these. It is only useful if you really need to use it as a fixed bridge guitar. Adjust the spring tension to make the bridge into a divebomb-only bridge. To do this, increase the spring tension until the bridge lies solidly along the ...


3

I'd recommend taking it to a guitar tech and letting them take care of it. It will take you longer to figure out the problem, and then fix it, than it will for them to fix it completely. I'm not familiar with that tremolo, but, if it's anything like a Fender, where there is a block that extends through the body, you can often take a wedge of wood and push ...


3

From the Ibanez technical forum: The tremolo is held in position by two opposing tensions - from the strings, and from the springs in the rear cavity. You can adjust the position of the spring claw, by loosening and tightening the highlighted screws, to get the correct balance.


2

Nobody's mentioned the bridge. For years I struggled with these issues and constantly blamed the nut and then the penny dropped. The G string was actually being pulled sharp over the bridge saddle which also cause the low E to go sharp. My solution is to thread the G string through a piece of the plastic insulation found on electrical wire and make sure it ...


2

Beyond the tricks mentioned above (to recap, nut lubing with graphite, proper nut slot cutting, winding up not down to reduce the angle), there's one I've seen that sounds good is Carl Verheyen's trick of setting the claw in back to parallel the tension of the strings. He goes into it on Youtube. I'm a Tele guy, so I don't really know from tremolos, but if ...


2

The other thing not yet mentioned, which I have on all my guitars that have floating bridges is a locking nut. This basically locks the strings at the nut so they don't move back and forth across the nut, which removes the problem entirely. May not be appropriate in looks for a strat, but it works.


2

prior to getting hold of floyd rose bridges, Eddie Van Halen used to wind his strings up the tuning peg rather than down as most of us do to reduce the angle that the string comes back at as it passes over the nut. this was done alongside making sure that the nut slots were loose enough and lubed with graphite as mentioned in other answers. all of these ...


2

With two of my old guitars (one with a Floyd Rose about 20 years old and one with a Kahler about 23 years old) they will go out of tune a bit the first few days I use them with a new set of strings, but after they settle down they'll then be in for months - and I do divebomb and pull up a fair bit:-) They both have locking nuts, which definitely helps by ...


2

First for the selector. Is the crackle sound just when switched or persistent when in one position? In the first case, compressed air and contact cleaner have always worked well for me on my near-20 years old Strat. In the second case might as well be the wires/soldering/pickups. For the tuning part, "tremolo" bridges need always a little more work to get ...


1

Loosen the strings and take off the cover on the back of the guitar. There will be two screws that secure the plate that the bridge springs attach to. Tightening them will pull the bridge down. You may need to trial and error a bit to get it where you want it. Different tunings will affect the floating bridge height due to different amounts of tension, ...


1

Re: the tuning. It is always best to have a pro do this, but with adjustable saddle and an electric tuner, you can try doing it yourself first. The basic idea is to tune all the open strings according to the tuner, then fret the note at the 12th fret(one octave up). The 12th fret note should be in tune. If the 12th fret note is off, adjust the saddle, retune ...



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