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13

My experience is strictly from playing the piano, but despite the difference in the specific motion required, the approach to building speed is the same. The short answer to your question is, "Don't do it". It's tempting to use the metronome to push yourself faster, but this strategy doesn't work largely for the same reason that this strategy doesn't work ...


7

Tremolo should be a reflex, not a active fast up/down bow. Almost like a vibrato reflex but with the bow. I don't mean bow vibrato, that is another technique/discussion, just mean tremolo should be unconscious, not forced. Sometimes tremolo can be very tiring if the right technique is not there. In classical musical typically Bruckner & Schumann write a ...


6

Tremolo picking means picking a note fast and repeatedly to give the impression of a single, sustained note with a "trembling" feel to it. You hear this a lot in mandolin playing: since the mandolin has such poor sustain, players use tremelo picking to play melodic lines that require longer-sustaining notes. It's not just playing really fast. A famous ...


5

I don't believe that they are individually replaceable. I think you will have to order a complete replacement tremolo. See this site, which says: The knife edges of the trem become worn or damaged and require filing to get back to a proper knife edge. This is also rarely seen on Edge variants [except Edge3!] and some "mating" of the parts is ...


5

Indeed, you need to bend notes on the diatonic harmonica because all notes are not available. And even when you'll be able to bend them, you'll find out that a few of them are still missing, and you'll then need to learn overblows to obtain them -- but you can worry about that later. You can, but don't need to bend notes on the chromatic harmonica because ...


4

Snapping strings has nothing to do with using a trem. A trem in the right position, will let you tune your strings quite happily to the right notes, so you have a separate problem here Aside from raising the trem up to gain more upwards movement, what else have you done? Are your tension springs in the same place, and is the tension bar screwed in the same ...


4

I'm not a violinist, but the practice is the same as on guitar. Start with the fundamentals Find a good few videos on proper bow technique, and tremolo technique. Watch them, then at a very slow speed execute them, and when I say slow I mean uncomfortably slow. Start Slow So slow that you can focus entirely on geting an even sound, and playing in ...


4

There are a number of pieces in the classical music repertoire that were specifically written to help learners develop their tremolo technique. Note: Be absolutely sure to use the correct right-hand fingers in learning tremolo. Carcassi's 25 Etudes, which are in the public domain and can be found in PDF version online, has several pieces which, if ...


4

Vibrato is pretty easy to define because there is one widely agreed-upon definition: a deliberate, regular, periodic change in pitch (like a controlled warble), generally much less than a semitone, sometimes as much as a quarter-tone or more up and down. Vibrato is commonly used as a performance technique by vocalists (including opera singers), players of ...


3

Tremolo is essentially a variation in volume, vibrato in pitch. They are nicely separated with bowed strings where "vibrato" is done by a variation in the fingering hand, and tremolo is done by a rapid back-and-forth of the bow on the same spot. However, lots of instruments have things they call "tremolo" or "vibrato". There is also the non-instrument ...


3

I have adopted Babu's suggestions. And I now make use of the metronome for two things: Checking that my playing has an even time. Discovering the tempo I'm playing at. Mostly, I'm just trying to make sure that I'm following (or working towards following) the tempo indication on the sheet music. The best increases in speed that I've made have been by ...


3

Its pretty much just fast picking; where instead of playing/picking each note in a riff once; you pick each note three/four/five times; at speed. I think the term 'tremolo picking' comes from the effect produced from doing this. Here's an example $6.5 $6.5 $6.5 $5.7 $5.7 $5.7 $6.8 $6.8 $6.8 $5.5 $5.5 $5.5 $6.7 $6.7 $6.7 $6.5 $6.5 $6.5 ...


2

I Use Sibelius G7. Tremolos are located on third pane of Keypad. Press CTRL+ALT+K (or menu Windows->Keypad) to display Keypad window, and then "+" key on numeric keyboard (or just use Your mouse to click) to navigate to third pane. You have options from 2 up to 32 tremolos. Examples of tremolos in Sibelius G7


2

I am only eleven years old but I have found that it is easier if you pinch the bow with your thumb and forefinger.


2

For right hand tremolo, there is no reason to damp or mute the string. I don't actually know of any pieces where you would do this. You have a range of options - but the most common these days is to use tirando strokes to pluck, which will definitely not lead to any muting. Even apoyando shouldn't. So typically, you would use tirando or apoyando with i and ...


2

+1 for the Carcassi Method. My teacher recommended that as well. As for tremolo picking, try this experiment: make a fist. In what order did you close your fingers? Pinky first? Index last? Then thumb? Probably. (That's how I do it.) Consequently, I found it easier to tremolo pick in the same order. For instance, in Leyenda, I would first use p-i, then ...


1

It does sound like your guitar isn't set up correctly, as the tremolo should be parallel with no buzz. The main problem I see is not so much with the tremolo, but with the fret buzz, though. This leaves you with some options. Leave the bridge non-parallel: The first option would be to leave the bridge in a non-parallel position to avoid fret buzz. This is ...


1

Tremolo is the rapid reiteration of very short notes that for the guitar gives the illusion of sustain. Vibrato is an effect on the guitar that is done by moving pulling the string up and down to move the pitch up to a full semitone. Which is used in Opera singing? Natural Vibrato is part of singing. It is done by the rapid alteration between two ...


1

Tremolo is alternating between two different tones, which are separately notated in the score. These might be quite close (a half-tone or full tone apart) or an octave apart. Vibrato is a sort of enriching a tone by slight or (depending on the performer:) not so slight variations in pitch; in the score you will typically not find anything, but the performer ...


1

While having each slash represent a division of the note into equal halves would be logical, this doesn't hold true when on a half note (or longer note). Rather, a better general rule is that each slash represents the number of beams equal to how many each note would have if written out. Thus, 2 slashes on a half note mean that the note should be divided ...


1

Old thread but here is my suggestion: I have a strange ability to do tremolo crazy fast by kind of "spazzing-out" my right arm, from the elbow. The way I do this, is to hold the arm rigidly and try to force it both up-bow and down-bow at the same time, if that makes any sense? It's like the muscles on either side of the arm (bicep vs. tricep) are both ...


1

Can you find some other way to break the problem into simpler steps other than by starting slow and gradually speeding up? For example, go straight for your target tempo, but practice shorter fragments? Also, have you taken a step back and looked at your technique? Maybe it would be worth experimenting with different fingerings or hand positions? A ...



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