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9

You're mostly spot-on with your analysis, but you miss something critically important: the two notes are not the same. They are enharmonic, but they are different notes. Assuming the context of C major, C will trill to its adjacent note, D, and D will trill to its adjacent note, E. Accidentals applied to the base note do not affect the note that is trilled. ...


8

Trills are (unfortunately) one of those things that only constant repetition will aid. Your body is not naturally used to the movements required for trills. When you constantly practice them, your brain will eventually pick up on the movements and it will become natural to you. Note, by "constant", I don't mean a two hour crash course session playing ...


8

Do it VERY slow and do it over and over. Not necessarily for a long time but do it often. You're talking about getting your muscles used to a very specific set of movements, and that has to be taught over a long time, and takes the same getting used to as it took you to stand up on your legs and bending your knees the very very first time. How long it takes ...


7

You're absolutely correct; this is a very challenging technique to pick up, it is 100% normal to have difficulty building speed, and you will get faster as you train your hands. This is one of those (few) times that I consider Hanon's virtuoso pianist exercises to be actually useful. You want to look at exercise 46 (page 76-77 of this edition). The ...


4

These are in fact all different. The D and G and bars 6 and 8 are in square brackets by the editor to indicate that they should be re-attacked, since the preceding note is the same. Bar 8 is not a trill. It should be played as two eighth notes G and F. Bar 12 is a normal trill where its first note (F#) was not the last one played, so no need to indicate it ...


4

According to Bach's father's own Explication concerning the trills and ornaments, we are given a guide on how to interpret the trills. The Expliation was later expanded on by C.P.E. Bach. There is no question that an historically correct interpretation will start the trill on the upper auxiliary note (in this case the A). The ornament does not descent to an ...


3

Start small and work your way up. Start with a hammer-on, for example, on the A string between frets 7 and 9, between index and ring fingers. This is probably the easiest place to trill, at least it is for me. Get that hammer-on good and solid. Try your best to make it faster. Once you master that hammer-on, immediately do a pull-off, and let the lower ...


3

Are you familiar with the concepts of "early music" and "historically-informed performance"? General background rather than a specific answer: I'm not a keyboardist or instrumentalist, but I work as a volunteer business person with a Baroque orchestra composed of career specialists in early music and historically-informed performance. All I can say is that ...


2

The mere existence of that thrill key is an indication, that there is a problem with the combination in question. Therefore the standard fingerings are unlikely to be combinable in sufficient speed and/or tone quality. For bassoon (I'm better acquainted with) there are special fingering tables for trills and it is more likely that they are different than the ...


2

Here is a great exercise I used to give to students as they get started doing hammer-ons and pull-offs, just pick it the first time and make a trill drill out of it. Starting in the first four frets, where the 1st finger is on the 1st fret, 2nd finger on the 2nd fret, 3rd finger on the 3rd fret, and 4th finger on the 4th fret: Do every possible combination, ...


1

I've heard this played two different ways: Option 1: Option 2: I believe the first one may be more technically correct, but you'd have to ask a baroque specialist. There may be other options as well, but these should be fairly in-line with the original style.


1

I'm looking at the imslp.org's photocopy of an original score, so I hope I got the right spot (no images allowed thru corporate proxywall :-( ). My guess is to start with the upper note of the trill as a sort of grace-note just prior to hitting the triad; then release the full triad prior to the final sixteenth. At least, that's how I'd approach a similar ...


1

@F'x showed me this resource, it displays the trill as follows: The red key is what you alternate.


1

Just to muddy the waters a bit, I think we are assuming equal temperament. That's safe if we are playing the above line on a piano (fretted guitar, etc. etc.) but if we are singing the line or playing it on an instrument without (or with fewer) mechanical tuning limitations like a violin then we needn't have C# and Db as the same pitch. That doesn't really ...


1

I'm no expert, but trill marks and other kinds of ornaments were interpreted differently in different times during the history of Western music. At certain times in history, notably in the Renaissance and Baroque eras, there were opportunities for the performer to improvise at such marks. How to play it, therefore, depends on what instrument you are ...



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