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8

Yes. All tenor and bass trombones are pitched the same. The difference between student instruments and professional ones is actually more in the bore size than whether or not the instrument has a trigger (which is typically called an "F attachment"). The F attachment's primary use is to extend the low range of the instrument, and enable technical facility ...


6

Nowadays I always get a close shave before playing the tuba in a gig. I started doing this when I realized that after longer breaks from playing I had trouble getting a distinct attack and tone when I had facial hair around the lips. I also had trouble playing pedal-notes. I then experienced getting a close shave as "gaining" one or two weeks of practice, ...


6

Your chops have a pain response for a reason! You can trust them--if you feel yourself nearing a threshold of pain, then stop immediately and wait until tomorrow, but chances are you'll be fatigued long before that happens. Just take it slow, use quiet, easy warmups to start, and trust your judgement as a brass player. Track out the time you put into ...


6

Tuning I'm assuming that what you mean by position chart is just a letter name to position number reference. That's not going to be enough—when you open a valve on the trombone, all of the positions get larger: you can only fit 6 positions on the slide with the F valve down, and only five with both F and D. I'm going to provide you with the following chart, ...


6

The best definitions in my opinion (and after some considerable research) are: A trumpet has a mouthpiece and bell that are located at opposite ends of the instrument. A trombone is defined by a bell section that is located to the rear of the instrument, with a mouthpiece located near the center of gravity and grip location. Thus, the trumpet will be ...


6

you literally just point your bell into the stand, not directly touching it, but the sound should be muted by the stand


6

Speaking as a brass doubler (trombone is my primary; I play all other brass instruments with varying proficiencies), the main difference between the embouchures for trumpet and trombone has to do with the tone concept. The trombone itself (and current pedagogy and instrument manufacturing) allows for a very open and dark tone concept, and the fact that ...


5

TL;DR version: Will low C be as hard as Bb to play even though it is not a pedal tone? Nope, harder Are pedal tones easier to play on large bore? Kind of, but not to an important degree Can you get luscious pedal tones down to E1 (no trigger) with a large bore tenor, or do you need a bass? Depends on your definition of luscious, but listen to ...


4

Saxophone at an advanced level will require you to do a bunch of stuff with your throat (voicing) that you probably won't be used to as a trombonist. I would personally recommend that you keep your trombone practice up as you begin to learn saxophone. The embouchures use somewhat different muscle groups, so practicing both daily will keep you on your toes ...


4

Actually, American manufacturers (notably Conn and Olds) produced slide-tuning instruments well into the 1960s. The design lasted longest in bass trombones (the Olds P24 and Conn 7xH). S. E. Shires currently produces a slide-tuning alto and makes slide-tuning slides for tenors and basses on special order. Kanstul makes a slide-tuning bass in its 1662 ...


4

I'm going to start as if you have already played a brass instrument and have some knowledge of them. As a former trumpet player and teacher I found that if you copy the same position and feeling w/o a mouthpiece as with a mouthpiece you can get great benefit. Trombone or trumpet. So practice the same embouchure w/o the mouthpiece. Form the same shape w/ the ...


4

A larger bore bass trombone will let you put more air through the horn in a manner that will let you more efficiently produce low register notes. (Lots of slow air). In my experience, this certainly helps, but will not magically solve all problems. It may even introduce a few of its own, especially if you're playing it for a long period of time, without ...


4

You really need to get more specific than "mouth muscles". The formation of your mouth and lips that is used to create a tone on the mouthpiece is called your embouchure (colloquially referred to as "chops" by many musicians). Once you identify what this is and what it feels like, as well as which muscles exactly are being used, it basically amounts to ...


3

I have played trombone with varying degrees of facial hair. I just trimmed the area around my lips so that I could sort of tuck the mouthpiece under my moustache in order to contact only skin for a seal. It was fairly easy, and with care to let the upper hairs grow long and hang over that area, unnoticeable. There was no real difference in my playing when I ...


3

The brass players I know and play with all seem to double on some other brass instrument. While it may take some time to adapt, I think it benefits to be able to know the different instruments. Think of it this way if you drive a car: In your own car you get to know the clutch and know when to shift gears, then when you drive another car you suddenly get ...


3

I'm not sure if anyone has actually pinned down the date or composer. Searches on Google or Trombone History books don't yield very much. According to a quote from one link I found: Its first deliberate use in performance is fairly recent in the long history of the trombone, and its acceptance as a legitimate technique came somewhat later. Also: ...


3

There are many ways you could approach this, but the best way is to find a qualified teacher. For something like this, even one lesson a month, (or even less frequently) would do much to help your tone along. Since embouchure and tone are such individual characteristics, both of you and your equipment, I can only offer a few sweeping generalizations. In my ...


3

To give a similar yet alternative answer to NReilingh's, I'll refer to Denis Wick (of the London Symphony Orchestra), who suggests that all players of all abilities should take a three-week long holiday/vacation away from the horn every year or so. When "playing in" again he gives a relatively detailed procedure of how long your should practice each day: ...


3

Its definitely tough to evaluate a beginner trombone when you've not played before. I would try to find someone who has at least played for awhile to help you evaluate potential instruments. A good high school trombone player should have enough chops and an ear to tell you that one is better than another, and suitable for beginning. You don't want very ...


3

I can't speak definitively on this since I haven't had a full beard and mustache before, but I've always made a point to keep what facial hair I do have out of the way of my mouthpiece placement. Not knowing the full magnitude of your facial hair, it's hard to make specific suggestions, but I wouldn't want a lot of hair cushioning the mouthpiece against my ...


3

The first answer above by NReilingh covers the physical appearance of the instruments but there is also an acoustic difference. A Slide trumpet has a large bore of .460-.470" and is played using a trumpet mouthpiece. It also has a long tapered lead-pipe inside the upper tube just like any other trumpet. A Soprano trombone has a more trombone like smaller ...


3

I play tuba, and I have learned (and practiced) that when you go up in the registers, firm-up the lips in from the corner of your mouth, not the center. This will reduce the length of the vibrating part of the lips, and like a guitar string, this will naturally generate a higher pitch. It will also make it easier to get a clean sound as you don't strain the ...


2

I play the trumpet, but this may be relevant to trombone. You need faster air flow to access to the higher register. A good way to do that is with your tongue. Think of it as whistling: the higher you whistle, the closer your tongue comes to the roof of your mouth. See images there. Doing that, you restrict the air way. In order not to lose too much air ...


2

Any local repair shop can order this part from a brass supply company like Allied Supply for about $15 + shipping. It needs to be soldered onto the slide. This is special solder ordered from a brass supply company for which they use an acetylene tank. This is an uncommon setup for the everyday person. However, most shops (like mine) charge ~$25 total for ...


2

I am currently trying to double high and low brass. My trumpet playing isn't great yet, but T-bone is unaffected. Not problem. I've been playing T-bone for years and marched the previous season. My band no longer marches T-bone, sad, but I though why not learn high brass. So I'm learning mellophone and trumpet. It is exactly like piano and organ or piano and ...


2

If it sounds OK and the instrument seems in otherwise good shape, it MAY be worth reconditioning. The first thing to try is to grab a real trombone snake; the bore of a trombone is a bit wider than most of a trumpet, and you want a brush that's wider than that bore in order to make a dent on any oxidation build-up in the slide. Follow these instructions: ...


2

I don't know for brass, but when I was a youngster studying fife, my instructor told us to practice inflating carrots.


1

If your worried about catching your bell on the stand, try a bucket mute for a similar effect. It may be about keeping control of volume, or it could be a stylistic effect.


1

Can't you take the slide completely out and clean it? and use a pipe-cleaner style piece to clean inside the slides?


1

Check if the handslide is closed and does not leak. Do this by demounting the trumbone and pressing your thumbs on the two notches and then lifting the handslide by just holding it at the grip. if the handslide goes up and stays up then the handslide is ok. if the handslide goes down, it is leaky and playing the trombone gets tougher, then don't buy it. ...



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