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15

I'm not really a brass player, though I used to be a band director and have some idea about brass acoustics. The issue with multiple-valve combinations being too sharp is that the valve system is a compromise. Pretend for a moment that you have a straight trumpet with no valves (so, pretty much a bugle). Of course, you can play pitches in the harmonic ...


12

Yes. They might be brash and full of bravado, but they will see the long term effects when they age. They will not be able to play for as long during their lifetime as they would if they were healthy. Quite simply: Wind instruments need wind. Smoking inhibits your ability to create wind. Therefore, reduced wind production reduces tone production, ...


11

There is indeed a reason! The notes you play on a trumpet with a particular fingering come from the harmonic series, which is a series of tones based on the root, or fundamental frequency. The idea is that the harmonics (also called overtones) are whole-number multiples of the fundamental frequency. If the fundamental frequency of, say, your trumpet, is ...


10

As the horn section you met has demonstrated - smoking and brass playing are not completely incompatible. People can play brass, and play well, despite smoking, at least for a period. Smoking definitely damages your ability to breathe; it reduces lung capacity; it stiffens lung tissue; it narrows breathing passages; it causes excess mucus; it reduces blood ...


8

Bending notes on a brass instrument without the aid of valves is done by changing the tension, and therefore buzz frequency, of the lips. Quite simply, it's easier to bend notes downward because it's easier to release tension than to create it. Also, as you go up in the harmonic series, the partials get closer together, so on any given note you'll be able ...


8

Overbite would only inhibit brass playing potential if your jaw caused your lips to close in a really odd way. You don't need straight teeth to play a brass instrument. If you're using your teeth / jaw to play brass, then you're headed for trouble. If your lips look like everyone else's when your mouth is closed / relaxed, then I can't anticipate you ...


7

All of the brass teachers I know (including myself) teach the jaw method. I find it preferable to the other two methods because: Diaphragmatic vibrato is going to disturb your support and airstream. Moving the fingers back and forth is just smushing the mouthpiece against your face, which runs the risk of fatiguing your embouchure earlier or letting air ...


6

Speaking as a brass doubler (trombone is my primary; I play all other brass instruments with varying proficiencies), the main difference between the embouchures for trumpet and trombone has to do with the tone concept. The trombone itself (and current pedagogy and instrument manufacturing) allows for a very open and dark tone concept, and the fact that ...


6

The best definitions in my opinion (and after some considerable research) are: A trumpet has a mouthpiece and bell that are located at opposite ends of the instrument. A trombone is defined by a bell section that is located to the rear of the instrument, with a mouthpiece located near the center of gravity and grip location. Thus, the trumpet will be ...


6

Think of a bugle in C. Bugles have no valves, and the notes you can produce on them are only the following: C - G - C - E - G - Bb - C - D - E - ... These match the overtone series of C. On the trumpet, however, you have valves, which enable you to play additional notes. Press the second valve and the length of tubing increases in the amount needed to ...


6

I've been searching online, talking with musicians about this, and here are some techniques I retained, with some interrogations : Get out of scales from time to time Totally off-scale, no limit (really?) Play a riff and play it elsewhere For instance and play it off one half-tone higher, and then come back / play it a half-tone higher again Ascend and ...


5

The only "convention" as such that exists, is that lots of manufacturers happen to use Bach's sizing numbers (where a smaller number = larger diameter and the letter refers to the shape of the cup), if only because Bach is so ubiquitous in the brass world. Here is a rather extensive chart: http://www.allbrassradio.com/tmptmpccharts.htm Both Schilke and ...


5

As Matthew indicated in his comment, once the wavelength of the sound gets smaller than the diameter of the tubing, the trumpet will no longer behave like a column of air. This means that, at these wavelengths, the trumpet will not support the resonance modes that make up its behaviour at normal frequencies. I.e. not sound like a trumpet (to the extent ...


5

Here's some philosophy on lip slurs. I haven't played this book in particular, but as a brass specialist I can talk about lip flexibility in general; it's the same thing. The ultimate goal of this is to have a clean transition between any two notes in different partials. This is the same whether you are trilling between two partials in a high register very ...


5

Conical vs. cylindrical bore instruments should not be a concern. The bell sections of all brass instruments are conical and the valve sections of all brass instruments are cylindrical--the differences between them are more subtle and occur elsewhere in the instrument. You really just need to try the mute on your cornet. Even within the same family of ...


5

The answer here is that you have a misconception about the "value" of each valve. The science of making a length of tube with three independent binary variances ("valves") fully chromatic across multiple octaves is an exercise in compromise. Each individual valve is slightly out of tune from what it "says on the label", such that the various combinations it ...


5

While is very tempting to approach improvisation focusing on phrases and licks, your solo may sound very awkward if you play unrelated chunk of melodies/ideas without thinking about beginning/development/ending. One aspect I love - and judge to be very important - about jazz improvisation are 'motifs', and you can't really apply that to a single phrase. ...


4

I suppose with a cornet you'll have the ability to add something extra in for texture, so something like finding the main melody line in the song, whether it be with guitar or vocals have the trumpet follow this line to emphasise the line and it could offer a massive difference to the sound and feel of the song depending, you should try looking at reel big ...


4

There are a few different factors at work here, and they hold true for all brass instruments: All of the different partials you can buzz for any one fingering combination fall into the harmonic series, which behaves according to the laws of physics. Equal temperament has very little to do with the laws of physics, and more to do with practicality. As a ...


4

If the player has a good ear (and you're not asking them to do really virtuosic playing), then the "embouchure shock" should be fairly minimal. As long as they're still reading transposed treble clef music, the fingerings will be exactly the same, with the notable exception of french horn (or is that a brass band instrument to start with?). Tuba doesn't ...


4

You know what you should do is learn jazz tunes. Learn the heads on the standards then worry about improvisation. It is limitless what can be done in the Jazz world but you have to know fundamentals. Your second post is too general, so I am assuming you need to learn standards and listen to a lot of Miles and look at transcriptions of his playing. Start ...


3

The simple answer from a historical perspective is that valves on brass instruments were an addition to simple coiled horns like the bugle and hunting horn. It's kind of counterintuitive to add something in order to take away something; why not add something that adds something? Add the valve, and add its pipe; with the valve not depressed, the instrument is ...


3

The best warm-up for extending range is likely going to be a series of gently-climbing scales that reach a semitone or two above your highest intended high note. Disclaimer: I speak strictly from vocal experience. I couldn't buy an embouchure with my life savings. Edit: These warm-ups look promising. It took a while for the PDF to load, so I will ...


3

The brass players I know and play with all seem to double on some other brass instrument. While it may take some time to adapt, I think it benefits to be able to know the different instruments. Think of it this way if you drive a car: In your own car you get to know the clutch and know when to shift gears, then when you drive another car you suddenly get ...


3

The first answer above by NReilingh covers the physical appearance of the instruments but there is also an acoustic difference. A Slide trumpet has a large bore of .460-.470" and is played using a trumpet mouthpiece. It also has a long tapered lead-pipe inside the upper tube just like any other trumpet. A Soprano trombone has a more trombone like smaller ...


3

To spin off from NReilingh's answer, the half-tone between G and F# requires less extra tubing to be in tune, than the half-tone between E and Eb. I believe that the third valve's length often is determined to have Eb in tune, and is therefore a little too long the have an in-tune E. Let the tubing required to get from G to Gb be a reference, let's say ...


3

Here are a few things that jazz players play over a dominant chord and give a 'jazzy' sound Let's say the chord that is being played is G7. What you can play is: G#o Arpeggio (G# is b9 of G7, so that note can also be added in the chord) G# auxiliary diminished scale If the chord is G7#5, you can play the whole tone scale. If the chord is G7(alt) (which ...


2

Rotary and piston valve brass instruments are constructed with two valve slides in tune (corresponding to the length of the instrument), being the 1st and 2nd. The fingerings "open," 2nd and 1st are typically in tune, but as soon as you begin combining valves, things no longer add up. It would seem that if the 1st and 2nd valve slides are engineered to play ...


2

I play tuba, and this implies there as well. The case is that the low tones that uses 13 and 123 are not really ideal fingerings for those tones. The reason you feel like the lowest F# (123) is sounding right, is that it is easier to adjust the tone with your lips in the lower register, so it is not the fingering that is correct, it is your adjustment with ...


2

It's likely that the valves are worn and the lubrication you are using is too thin. Just like STP for car motors using thicker oil (like rotor oil) will help the problem. When the piston can no longer drag on the way up it will return smoothly to the proper "up" position. Do not consider this a "fix". The only lasting repair is to have the casing and pistons ...



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