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Flugel is far more conical than cornet. Cornet is only just barely not cylindrical and is really just slightly sweeter than trumpet, while flugel is so dramatically conical that the design involves moving the valve cluster way up so that the bell can take up the majority of the instrument, and is more akin to a euphonium. That's what's responsible for the ...


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You just do it a lot. At the start you'll be thinking "up one from C is D". After a bit it will just come naturally. I used to teach brass instruments. Trumpet/cornet was the most popular choice. If there was a piano in the room, I'd improvise an accompaniment to their pieces. I can still look at any piece of music and play it "one down" almost without ...


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I'm sort of disappointed in the answers here. I think a lot of the respondents don't actually play trumpet, or any kind of transposing instrument. I've been playing in orchestras on trumpet and horn for years, both of which often have to deal with odd transpositions, and nobody learns new fingerings or employs clef tricks. You just mentally move each note ...


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I'm seeing suggestions to either relearn the fingerings on trumpet or just mentally calculate the transposition of each individual note while playing. I would strongly advise against either of these methods. Instead, you should learn to read the music on the staff differently. The key to relatively easy transposition is learning different clefs. ...


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You transpose the key the same interval as the notes you want to transpose. So for instance if you are in C major and you want to transpose the piece a major third up your new key should be the key a Major third up from C ie E. This conveniently makes all the notes three spaces up major thirds. Just remember that you should still take into account any ...


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This is the answer, if you are unable to invest the time learning mental transposition (which is obviously the method of choice, but might get tricky in stress situations as public performance): transpose the scores yourself. Any decent note typesetting software has this function- the most critical part being to decide in which direction you have to ...


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Assuming you are aware of which sharps or flats occur in which keys, I suggest you re-learn the trumpet's valve order. As in open is actually a Bb, not the C; valves 1 and 3 give C, not the D that you're fooled by on the dots, etc. If you're reading, then imagine each dot is on the next line UP if it's written on a space, or next space UP if it's written on ...


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If the music is relatively simple, you can sometimes do this by thinking of every note by its scale degree, and transposing it in your head to the other scale before you play it. If you are reading a piece on a Bb instrument, you would simply shift every note up a whole step in your mind. However, the "right" way to do this (i.e. the one taught to students ...


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What is the distance between C and Bb/A#? 1 tone. So you transpose every note on the sheet by 1 tone. For example, if a note is D then it will turn out to be C when transposed. If it is F you get Eb/D# C (st) C#/Db (st) D (st) D#/Eb (st) E (st) F (st) F#/Gb (st) G (st) G#/Ab (st) A (st) A#/Bb (st) B (st) C (St) means semitone The C major scale is ...



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