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14

Assuming the stumbling block you are facing is the physical size of your grandson vs. a tuba or sousaphone, there's only so much you can do to reduce the standard instrument's size. Unlike string instruments, which offer smaller versions of themselves tuned the same way, wind instruments require a tube of a certain length to play the proper tone. Tubas do ...


11

Looks like a Sousaphone to me. :)


9

The composers/arrangers/publishers of tuba parts and sheet music have no idea what key of instrument you play! In Europe, the Eb tuba is fairly widespread, but the standard issue tuba in American school bands is actually keyed in Bb! In a conservatory, you will find tuba players who own multiple instruments for a wide variety of different playing ...


7

That is a Sousaphone, but this one is made mostly of fiberglass plastic (except for the small brass pipes and valves.) Other Sousaphones are made with brass parts (sometimes silver plated.) It is not "Home-Made" - Sousaphones are manufactured by several music instrument companies in the US, Europe and Asia. Sousaphones are usually pitched in BBb (old ones ...


6

I think half-valve is the only technique that would be effective. Try to find a valve position that gives you the flexibility. It can involve any number of valves in any position (whatever if they are involved in the start or the end tone). Once you find a position where you can have a rather large range, use that for your drops and falls. In these ...


5

There are two things on the tuba that make it hard to play fast runs -- the valves and the pitch. The valves are big and have a lot of travel, and they have fairly strong springs. Moving them fast and accurately requires training your muscles as well as your brains. This requires practice. The low pitch of a tuba means there's a bigger time lag between when ...


5

The difference really is noticeable to an experienced player. Depending on the experience level and even genre of music played, the effects may be noticed after only a few months of not cleaning, or after two years. It all depends. If an high school player is playing mostly the low rumbly notes of a concert band piece, they may not notice much affect at all, ...


4

From an equipment standpoint alone this is a better technique, and is encouraged whenever smaller piston instruments are taught as well. Curving the fingers on top of the finger buttons ensures that the force on the valve is going to be straight up and down instead of to the side. On student instruments, this is especially important since seldom-oiled valves ...


4

Here is a plausible explanation paraphrased from a discussion elsewhere. Trumpets and horn used to be valveless instruments. You could use a "crook" to adjust the pitch. If you wanted to play trumpet in the key of C you put in the C crook and you could play using the C major triad. To play in D you put in the D crook,and so on. So, they would write all ...


3

I can't say as to your original education, but in the United States, the tuba is not treated as a transposing instrument. Most students of the tuba learn to read music in concert pitch regardless of how their particular instrument is tuned. So, in the US, you wouldn't have been taught based on transposed music. This is primarily because the tunings of a ...


3

The Eb tuba that is smaller than BBb tuba, but it still feels like a tuba... Like NReilingh said, there are different sizes also within the key, but you can get Eb tuba quite small. I started playing Eb tuba in a shool orchestra at the age of 10. When playing I used to have the tuba lying horisontally on my lap to reach up to the mouth piece. This worked ...


3

For a rotary-valve tuba, the process is slightly different because the rotary valves cannot be removed from their housings (unlike piston valves). However, the basic idea is the same: Draw a lukewarm bath of water into the tub. Add a mild hand soap to aid cleaning; DO NOT use dish detergent (you'll never get it back out of the rotaries no matter how much ...


3

This is for a piston-valve tuba, by the way, not a rotary valve. Also keep in mind to do this all very gently, tubas scratch easily. You'll want to take it completely apart (valves out too, and remember how it goes together) and set in a bath tub full of warm/hot water. Then, add some soap (mild, non-abrasive) and rub it gently with a cloth to get off grime ...


2

I used to play in a church band with a professional jazz Sax player. Whenever we had a break, he would pull out out these pages of runs in different keys and just play them. I always thought it strange that someone who was a professional would bother doing that. Isn't that just for when you are learning? One day, I had a chance to see him do an improv ...


2

Overall, the residue will affect the sound if it's large enough to change the shape of a tube. If you have a lot of dirt or "stuff" inside it can affect the tube size or change the direction of the sound waves, and so change the tone and pitch. It is probably more important to keep the valves clean and oiled so they don't wear and leak around the edges (and ...


2

Looks like a Tuba/Sousaphone. The smaller Tuba you're referring to is probably a Tenor Tuba/Euphonium.


2

In addition to other brilliant answers here, I would also point out another benefit of generally being able to read concert pitch bass clef. From time to time, we have compositions that include parts written for contrabass or string bass, and those are naturally written in C natural. If there are important sections in those parts that are missing in the ...


2

Yes. When cleaning the tuba (in the sense of a full cleaning of the instrument), you should also take out the springs in order to clean properly. This is for more easily cleaning both the springs and also the bottom interior of the housing.


1

Short answer, no. To oil it, first unscrew the top valve cap and remove piston. Next wipe off the old oil. Apply the new oil to the piston. Replace piston to valve casing and re-screw top valve cap. Screw the finger-piece clockwise until it stops. This aligns the piston correctly in the casing. Press and depress key quickly to work oil around. You ...


1

i think the man in the photo is a member of "Los luthiers" (a group from argentina). if he indeed is, i bet he built his instrument quite probably based on a tuba. It is not uncommon for them to build their own instruments, with cans, bottles, etc.



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