Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

In Pythagorean tuning, the pitches are generated by compounding perfect (just intonated) fifths, one way to do this is to go symmetrically outward from a central pitch, octave reducing. C F-C-G Bf-F-C-G-D Ef-Bf-f-C-G-D-A Af-Ef-Bf-F-C-G-D-A-E Df-Af-Ef-Bf-F-C-G-D-A-E-B Gf-Df-Af-Ef-Bf-F-C-G-D-A-E-B-Fs Note that Gf, Fs generated this way are very close in ...


4

You seem to have several confusions. First of all, 12-tone equal temperament does not, and cannot have perfect fifths defined as exactly 3/2. It is impossible by definition. In 12TET, all half steps must be the same size, and there must be twelve of them in an octave. This means that whatever factor (x) you multiply a frequency by to raise it a half step ...


4

You already know some of the ratios. An octave is 2:1. A just/pure fifth is 3:2. (A perfect fifth may not have this exact ratio, by the way. More on that later.) If you divide an octave into twelve equal parts, you need a number that, when multiplied by itself 12 times, equals two. That is the twelfth root of two (≈ 1.059463094359295). To determine the ...


1

Fluctuations in the relative humidity and other environmental conditions in the room where the piano is located can result in movement of the wood components which can affect the tuning of the entire piano - not just one key (although some are affected more than others). Some movement of the wood is unavoidable and all pianos will go out of tune to one ...


2

A single key getting out of tune with itself, where that keys' strings stop being perfectly in tune, is precisely what makes a piano sound bad (to my ear at least) and is certainly common since it would be weirder if all 3 strings on each key did go out of tune at exactly the same rate. You can easily tell by playing single keys, if any sound out of tune ...


2

The point of unequal well-tempered tunings is that the keys don't sound the same. Temperaments like Werckmeister III or Vallotti or 18th century French ordinaire are meant to be usable in any key while letting each have its own colour. (Vallotti is quite commonly used on fortepianos.) For most of what you're doing, you could probably get away with a mean ...


2

Equal temperament is key-agnostic. Well-tempered tuning isn't. The point of well-tempered tuning is that all keys are tolerable, but some are still better than others and each has its own character. This own character was pretty much the whole point of Bach's "Wohltemperirtes Clavier" (it is usually assumed that some Werckmeister tuning reflects the ...


2

I am a Registered Piano Technician with the Piano Technicians Guild. Pianos go out of tune during a move due to humidity differences and/or the different shape of the floor. The floor can slightly twist the piano which knocks it out. Now, let's be reasonable here. Was this piano tuned every four months? Are you going to keep tuning it every four months? ...


0

I am adding this as a new answer based on new understanding that you may have a half size guitar. That short of a scale might indeed work better with a higher tuning. But it may not work with the i-phone chord ap if not in standard tuning (not sure). Most 3/4 size and up will do well with standard tuning if the appropriate strings are used. To tune ...


1

Kudos Alan for encouraging your son to play guitar. Good Dad! You can tune your lowest (6th) string to A and tune the rest from there -but I don't recommend this. I do recommend a digital electronic tuner or smart phone tuning ap. But even a short scale guitar should be perfectly capable of staying in tune in standard E A D G B e tuning. You mentioned ...


1

Unless it's a VERY short scale guitar, it should be tuned to standard. The gauge of the strings ought to be correct for this to happen. It may be that someone else has put 'standard' (or even non-standard!) strings on. Check with the manufacturer or a music shop to get the correct gauge strings, as it is a good starting point. They can be altered when you ...


1

I'd leave it for a week or so, as it's in a different environment - may be warmer, colder, more/less humid than its last home. Then get it tuned. You may have a nasty little surprise, especially if it's a wooden frame, when the tuner says he can't bring it back to concert pitch. Maybe he will over two or three tunings - maybe it doesn't matter to you, but if ...


2

If you are going to tune the strings all in perfect fifths (in other words use B and F# for the fifth pair, instead of B and F natural), I think it is worth me adding a different answer (which I wouldn't usually do otherwise!) Essentially, every chord you play will also have the notes of the same chord type transposed up by a fifth (as @Tim points out, these ...


2

For strumming it will be awkward, as with that tuning, you'll have, for example, on an open E chord, an E chord AND a B chord simultaneously. Thus you'll hear E, F#, G#, B, and D# all together. For an idea, try it on a piano. It gives a major 9th chord. Moving to an Em shape will give an Em9. Only if that B string is matched with an F#!! On second thoughts, ...


6

I don't see any reason why you can't experiment with different tunings for the pairs of strings on a 12-string guitar. But it is worth bearing in mind a few things: you will need to choose the appropriate gauge of strings; a standard set of 12-string guitar strings are designed for the regular tuning. you will have to learn a completely new set of chord ...


0

Absolutely, you can. But it would probably mean you have to play much more carefully - I guess chords might stop working in many/most cases. Having your paired strings 3rds apart or 5ths, maybe might work for picking... my guess is also basing it around an open tuning might be easier. I wonder also if you tune strings so all notes are be in the same chord ...


0

You can use mobile apps tuner to tune. I am a self-starter too. I use Super tuner android app for both of my violins and it works pretty good for me. It just needs a very quiet place to tune as it cant feel any vibration and work only by listening to the sound using microphone. There is an instrument choose option and you can choose violin. It automatically ...


0

Intonation is certainly important, but I'd like to add an observation about other factors. 30 years ago in music school I studied operatic singing (I'm a tenor). With regard to being "louder", first there is learning to sing with greater volume, but second, and just as important, is learning to cultivate a certain resonance in the voice that involves ...


0

The short answer is "Yes" and the facts behind that are "Resonance" and "Harmonics". Resonance: Resonance happens when an object sounds a note, another object tuned to the same note starts vibrating and giving sound of the same note. So we get a louder tone when there are resonating objects around. Harmonics: When a note is played the base frequency and ...


6

You're E string should be tuned to E5 which is 659.3Hz. Here's a video that plays each open string for you. Tune your violin to sound like it.


0

I recognize the phenomenon and I believe that - among other factors (see below) - it must have to do with the way sound waves combine, i.e. with constructive or destructive interference. I think that your argument concerning energy conservation is not valid, because e.g. in active noise control sound waves are designed to cancel each other, so there is ...


1

There is an interactive 19 TET keyboard on our website: academo.org/demos/19-tet-keyboard It uses the Web Audio API, meaning you can play it online with your computer keyboard or by clicking on the notes (as long as your browser supports Web Audio - currently Chrome, Safari and Firefox).


1

In my experience it is better to move the bridge tuners close to the top, i.e. the position where you can hardly tune down but you have the maximum range for tuning up. Then you tune the guitar properly using the machine heads, and then you lock the system. The reason is that the strings always get lower (i.e. they relax), you hardly ever need to tune them ...


7

It makes sense for the bridge tuners to be about in the middle of their travel (a couple of turns in from the top is recommended) while the new strings are being tuned using the head machine heads. That way, any subsequent adjustment at the bridge will be available, up or down. Maybe the tech didn't do this, but should have. Yes, your plan should work - and ...


1

How you tune depends on context, to some extent. If you are playing alone, as long as the guitar is tuned to itself so the chords sound right, it's okay. By okay, I mean you're not teaching your ears the right pitches -- my playing got so much better when I got an electronic tuner -- but it's still possible to learn and play. If you want to play with ...


0

While some recordings may be sped up or slowed down (particularly older ones), and it's possible your guitar may be a little too high or low, it's probably not by all that much. Stringed instruments like guitars are designed to be tuned to concert pitch. If they're not, string tension may be to loose or too tight. This can cause problems but only in ...


2

Yes and no! What comes to mind is the difference between relative and absolute pitch. Relative pitch would mean that your guitar is tuned a certain way relative to all the other guitar strings, but not necessarily to a convention, such as A 440. If your guitar is properly tuned in the relative sense, it will sound in key while playing alone or with other ...


1

I play in drop C, the tuning is this, starting from the lowest to highest string...CGCFAD. I absolutely Love this tuning and here's why. It's easier to play super fast power chords and use slides. From a power chord you can easily simply add notes on the 4th string that are in the scale to make low minor and major chords. Example, have the two lowest ...



Top 50 recent answers are included