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0

I can strongly recommend reading Harry Partch's Genesis of a Music, in which he goes into depth on the history of tunings and the reasons for them. Out of this he derives his 43-tone-to-the-octave scale, and then talks about the instruments he had to build and adapt to play music in this scale, and the compositions he did using them, in detail. The 43-tone ...


0

It is neither easy nor difficult to compose in JI, it is not a significant part of the history of western music, especially over the past 600± years. JI is based on the fundamental. Western music in developing tonality is based on sets of hierarchical relationships where 'scale degree' ^1 is more important than ^5, and harmonically, ^5 is more important than ...


0

An old question with many answers... but the one thing no-one seems to have mentioned is that the care & attention applied in the actual stringing process can considerably reduce the amount of stretching required. Method 1 - the sloppy way... Tuck the end of the string through the slot, then wrap as much of the rest as you can round the post before ...


0

Kaz brings up an interesting point: Not returning to the original pitch indicates that the material has been extended beyond its elastic limit This is mostly true, which is why you'll notice that stretching the top strings doesn't do all that much. However the wound strings (typically the bottom 3 or 4) absolutely need to be stretched, because the ...


-2

I heard the NY Philharmonic tunes to 441 a long time ago. 441 and 432 make sense, BECAUSE each is divisible by 9. I suggest watching the video on Youtube about the number 9.


2

I change my tuning all the time, including using DADGBE as you do and have had the same guitar for a decade, with no problems as a result. Especially since you are just slightly changing the tuning of the low E string, which is your strongest, I doubt it will even have an impact on the strength of the string. It is NEVER my first to pop!


3

Since you're only loosening one string, and for a short while, no harm in that. The other strings may change their tuning slightly in the process, but that's o.k. Those DGs are good guitars, but consider keeping it, and having two when you upgrade - one standard, one D-tuned. Yes, on electrics, it's the same, except those vibrato-equipped will probably have ...


3

This will not hurt the guitar, especially since you're only adjusting one string. Even with more general tuning changes, e.g. changes to open D, you won't hurt the guitar; the worst side-effect might be sub-optimal neck relief. Re-tuning will tend to wear the strings more; causing them to break more easily, but I've noticed this more on the thinner ...


8

You will have a very small amount of extra wear and tear on that machine head and the groove in the nut that string passes through, but aside from that this should cause no damage to an acoustic or electric guitar. The change in tension on the neck from that one shift is not significant, in fact you can get a greater change from atmospheric conditions. So ...


0

Lots of misperception here! Besides changes in humidity, using different gauge strings is the next-largest single contributor to action changes/problems, as is tuning the entire guitar up or down a whole step or more. Using alternate open tunings will typically have very tiny, mostly-irrelevant affects on the playing action. The purpose of the truss rod ...


0

A little confusion here! .012" set of strings isn't 'fairly light' - it's about standard. The truss rod doesn't get adjusted in 'steps'. If they meant half a turn it's still meaningless. The truss rod adjustment is only part of sorting out the action. The bridge height is just as relevant. As is the effect of heavy strings. They won't change the action, once ...



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