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1

There are machine heads on the market that look like they'll match yours. The problem may be the space between the A and B string machine heads. Best is to contact the manufacturers of both the heads and the bass, and ask the question there.


12

Back in the 60s, unless there was an instrument that couldn't easily be re-tuned, i.e. piano, organ, etc, featuring in the set, all guitars were tuned to each other, probably using the first one that was in tune. It wasn't that important, as long as everyone was at the same pitch. Occasionally a piano was used, and the band would have to tune to whatever ...


0

I recognize this is a question resurrected from 4 years ago. But after reading all the answers, there is something missing that I feel compelled to add for the sake of anyone who comes across this question in the future. Adding a capo will almost always cause the tuning to go sharp to some extent. That's not a problem if you are playing solo with no ...


0

My band plays in many different capo positions and it can really limit the way you arrange live set lists due to the tuning issues (and the time that it takes to effectively tune) that capos present. My experience is that when you attach a capo to the neck of the guitar, you will generally be sharp and will need to tune down some. I'm a lead player, so ...


5

A look over the Blue Note article on Wikipedia that Shevliaskovic linked talks a bit about the tuning theory behind Blue Notes, so I'd like to expand on that, as you mentioned wanting a "Mathematical" definition of these notes. The article states that in order to overcome tuning hardships in keyboard creation in the 18th century, Equal Temperament was ...


7

The archetypal bluesy sound comes from bending and inflecting the notes within certain ranges. When soloing, I personally play the blues scale on guitar as a pseudo-pentatonic something like this (C tonic): C a 'window' around Eb, covering the range down to D and up to E. F, bending up a little (maybe not as far as Gb) G Bb, with scope to bend up a little ...


10

That blues note is nebulous. It can be, and is, anywhere between a minor 3 and a major 3. Listen to blues players, and you'll hear it bent fully from min. to maj., or just hinted at with a tiny flick from minor upwards. The listener probably completes the bend in his mind's ear. It sometimes gets played as a straight major that gets wobbled down to minor and ...


5

The so called 'blue note' has it's roots in the African immigrants in the States. Back in Africa, they didn't have the piano to tune their voices to, so they sung what they liked best. When they came to the Western World, they found out the piano (and other instruments of course) and they learned to play it. When they begun to sing the blues, songs based ...



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