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0

Checking out: If you use the harmonic over the 7th fret of the E string, you get a B. You can use this B to tune the strings E and B together. That leaves you with 2 ways to tune the remaining E string: Using the 5th fret of the B string or ring the other E string itself. This will test true 2 of your memory resources: Strings B and E. You can use this to ...


2

Assuming you have access to an amplifier, you can use the buzzing noise that they make when not plugged into a guitar, called mains hum, to tune. For example, in the UK, mains hum is 50Hz, which is about equivalent to G1 (49Hz). Of course, you will be very slightly out (1Hz) but seeing as you aren't tuning against anything else, this will not matter too ...


0

Ok, so here's a hypothetical way do it that works without any pitch references and is in principle exact, assuming a guitar that behaves ideally (neglecting inharmonicity, which is really quite uncautious for plucked string instruments) and only needing some timing reference. What you do is, you first tune the guitar to Pythagorean tuning. That works the ...


0

One thing from a looong time ago (okay may not that long ago) is to use a landline telephone to tune the A string, because the "dialtone" is 440 Hz which is A.


1

Following from Mr. Boy's answer, I just tried to see if I have a "Natural frequency". I found that if I hum, I get a sort-of internal resonance that corresponds fairly closely to D# on my acoustic. Might be worth a try to see if you can find something similar.


2

Here's an out of the box answer for you (which is what I think you're looking for)... An unconventional reference you could potentially use is a computer monitor. Here's how to do it... Look at the refresh rate in the monitor settings (usually around 60 Hz). Set the refresh rate to a frequency (or harmonic) you can achieve on at least one string on ...


3

When I was younger it often happened that I needed a pitch reference. The only way I could do it was try and spontaneously sing a song that I heard a bazilion times. Epic by Faith No More worked well, as I knew the first note should be an E, so I'd sing that, see if it sounded right and tuned to my first note. Not foolproof, but I guess it is similar to ...


1

Find out what the dialing tone of your phone company is. That should be a reliable reference (in some countries, 440Hz is used I think). Of course, this has become much less useful with analog lines dying out since the dialing tone these days does not necessarily come from the phone company any more. Ok, so we have modern times. Program your mobile phone ...


8

There are many answers here and some good advice for when other instruments are available. But I feel a need to make an obvious point. All of the suggestions would help you get in the "ballpark" (close) in the absence of any reference tone. BUT - if you can already get within a half semi-tone by ear - nothing short of a tuning aid or something to generate ...


2

Simple honest answer is you won't! If you had absolute pitch, it's a different ball-game. When playing by yourself, it actually won't matter. If the instrument is a semitone out either way, the difference is so small, it isn't an issue. If you're playing with others, then all need to be in with each other, so use one instrument as reference. Acoustic piano ...


0

I wouldn't trust my tone memory on this, or “feel”; sometimes I'll hum the deepest note I can and tune according to that, but that's also only accurate to a semitone at most. When I check out some untuned string instrument and have no reliable reference at hand, what I do first is “order” the strings by relative detuning. If some ...


2

Base the first string you tune on an old favorite song of yours. Many times you have a certain song so ingrained in your memory, that hearing that first note will either ring true or sound off. So go through your mental music library, find that song that starts with an arpeggiated open chord like E or A, and tune the corresponding sting to that first ...


4

I suppose you could see if you have any "natural frequencies" you can make reliably yourself. Having perfect pitch makes that trivial but if not, if you hum or sah 'ah' like being at the dentist, without aiming for any particularly tone, you might be fairly reliable at producing the same tone. If you can find which fret of which string that corresponds to, ...


1

It depends on context. If you are playing by yourself you don't need to be 100% in tune. As amalgamate said, trust the lowest string and tune to that. As long as you're in tune with yourself most people won't know the difference. If, however, you are playing with any other players the goal is still first to be in tune with each other. A piano can play you a ...


2

I think you either need to have perfect pitch yourself, a reference pitch like a tuning fork or another instrument (or even a CD) you assume to be in tune, or a tuner (or something that can 'become' one, like a smartphone or computer). Of course you could probably do something like measuring the tension on the string and working out the resonant frequency ...


1

Without a reliable source of pitch or a tuner, Your best shot is to trust the lowest note as being in tune. It has the least tension and the most friction because of its designated size and pitch.


1

When plucking the string, it vibrates against the resistance of the air. When bowing the string, it vibrates in contact with the intentionally sticky bow. While the bow does a good job continually supplying energy to the string, the "free" movement of the string would be faster than when it swings and sticks.


0

The reason the bow produces sound is that sliding friction of the bow on the string is lower than static friction. What happens when bowing is that the bow initially starts out grabbing the string and stretching it until the force of the string exceeds the static friction of the bow. At that point, the string will slip and vibrate for one cycle, during ...


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i3zif.com provides online lessons in English (video course) for playing the Oud. It's not free though. http://www.i3zif.com/en/oud-english-beginners1


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When getting close to the right pitch leave the stings for a minute before tightening. As tension increases, adjust tuning slower. Don't pick while turning up on new strings. Check tuning, mute, adjust, repeat.


0

Bleth! It is very often needed to to tune them right away on just buyed harmonicas, many very links on that (of course you have to practise skills): http://www.harplog.com/faq4_tuning.shtml + ...


0

For less experienced player, it may be difficult to judge if the string sounds lower or higher than required. The guitar book I used long time ago recommended first to adjust the tone clearly too low first and then gradually increase the tension. I followed these instructions and, indeed, it never happened for me to break a string.


5

I feel your pain. This used to happen to me all the time when I started on the guitar. My problem was, even though I was using an electronic tuner / piano / pitch pipe for reference, I couldn't tell that I was way above the correct pitch - exactly what Meaningful says. What helped me, besides just getting a better ear so I knew if I was around the correct ...


0

I think you should invest in an electronic tuner which tells you if you should put it lower or higher right on the screen. The same thing happened to me when I was a beginner on the guitar. The phobia always comes back when I tune the strings, but now that my ears know the right tone it's easy as cake. Just keep practicing and try to get an electronic ...


0

Meaningful's answer is correct. Trouble with a lot of tuning sites, and tuners for that matter, they will identify a note by name, rather than by actual pitch. This can mess up beginners. The old fashioned (and tried and tested) method of 5th fret against the next string is a good, slower (maybe), but safer way to do it. You need to know about it, anyway, ...


2

It sounds like you are going over the intended pitch of the string, and end up aiming for an octave higher. This will break the string. If you are sure the pitch is correct and the string still breaks, there might be something on your guitar that needs adjusting. Since it's an acoustic guitar this sounds less likely, since the saddles aren't of metal ...


1

Likely 443. That's what half a dozen other Russian orchestras use, claims http://members.aon.at/fnistl/page3.html (found via Why are orchestras tuned differently? ).



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