New answers tagged

1

Not exactly a replacement, as the tuning, although equivalent in terms of pitch class, is an octave below that of the madolin or fiddle (or violin, for that matter). But since the size of the instrument makes it possible to tune it in fiths, as explained by Scott in his answer, it makes of course all the sense to tune it in a way that can be immediatly ...


2

It's probably, as you suggest, an ergonomic reason: larger stringed instruments in general tend to have smaller intervals between the strings, because that makes scales easier to reach with the fingers. Smaller instruments (such as the tenor banjo) can afford to have larger intervals between the strings, which gives the instrument a greater range for the ...


1

The bass waltzes composed by Dragonetti have a lot of paired notes that go from 1st to 4th finger across strings to minimize shifting. The same can be said for the 6 Vivaldi sonatas and Benedetto Marcello sonatas. It seems that composers in that period took into account the tuning in 4ths and made pieces that fascilitated the playing to bassists. (I'm aware ...


1

If you only think about the fixed frequency instruments, just intonation is not good for the instrument construction, there is good examples for the guitar above. There will be technical difficulties with a piano and other instruments too. But for continuous variation pitch instruments, the just intonation will have more natural sounding. There is a good ...


0

Are you sure the bridge is rightly positioned? Banjo intonation can some times be tricky, requiring the bridge to be positioned in a slightly oblique orientation to allow proper intonation of both the low and high strings. Try the harmonics at the octave fret in both the treble and bass D strings (1 and 4 counting upwards) making sure they give the same ...


0

If, by the 4th D string, you mean the lowest string of the banjo (there is some confusion about the numbering of banjo strings), then it's most likely that the string is at fault- it's probably not wound heavily enough. Are you sure it's the right kind of string?


-2

I have the same thing happen on fender acoustic and squire start electric. It could happen very quickly after just a few hours; being a finish carpenter I know that the wood is not going to pull in or lose that much humidity that quickly. So I would venture to guess it's our technique coupled maybe with the styles we play. I've been using finger picking ...


6

All new strings need a good stretch to allow them to bed in. The metal itself has to stretch a little, the windings round the post have to settle and the neck has to re-adjust to the tension change. Along each string, pull and push, but not like you'd pull a bow (and arrow). Lift up and push down a couple of inches away from each other - it's not easy to ...


0

Good answers. Just some clarifications. 1hz at 440 is about 4 cents. Someone mentioned 15 cents. A tuning fork can vary up to 3 cents easily just from moderate temperature differences. Swings due to season changes, in my professional experience (tuning for 16 years) can be up to about 4hz. That's 16 cents at A4. Calibration of tuning software accounts for ...


1

I've never seen a piano a tone sharp. You probably mean D sounds like C. It is not unusual to find an old piano that is tuned under pitch. Often it is done to avoid breaking strings. Sometimes it is the result of the owner not wanting to pay the extra money to tune the piano at concert pitch. Some really old pianos were designed to be tuned at 435hz. ...


0

This would be extremely rare for a new-ish piano just from moving (unless maybe if it got pulled out of the lake and left in the rain and/or dropped down the stairs during the move). Yes, it can probably be fixed and is probably worth fixing. You would need to have a pro look at it and do an assessment.


1

Not only can it be fixed there is actually a whole profession built around fixing it. Piano tuner is a musical profession rich is stature and history. It is a profession that is often promoted among people with visual impairments as their heightened sense of hearing makes them well suited to a profession where you have to listen attentively to the pitches ...


10

I'd honestly expect it to be flat rather than sharp! If the piano has a wooden frame holding the strings, it would be unwise to try to move the tuning much. When you tried it, and it was in tune, maybe it wasn't at concert pitch anyhow. If the frame is cast iron, it shouldn't have gone out by that much - unless it's not been tuned for years, and maybe has ...


0

One of the best microtonal instruments may be the slide guitar. Listen to Duane Allman play slide guitar, or David Gilmour play lap steel, or countless others. Not only do they reach the tones between the notes, but I suspect that they are naturally gravitating to the just tempered notes as well. That purity is what makes skilled slide guitar players sound ...


3

Tuning a guitar lower than standard will certainly impart a darker, heavier sound. That's the reason many metal bands seem to employ various type drop tunings. A standard scale 6 string guitar (25-1/2" or 24-3/4") tuned down an octave (or tuned down to F# below the standard low E) would not be very practical to play in a typical guitar playing sort of ...


4

As you detune strings, they start to get "floppy" and the guitar becomes hard to play well. To prevent those problems, you can use thicker strings, a longer scale length, or both. At some point, the strings become so thick that you need to widen the nut slots or else the strings won't sit in them correctly. You also may find that you need a higher action and ...


0

Just intonation is only impractical if you insist on having a scale of more than six fixed steps, with all the intervals being 5-limit just. God and/or math doesn't work that way. The most cogent way of putting it is this: no power of two is also a power of three, and no power of three is also a power of five.


0

I have played for 20 years and have been singing a lot... I have come to the conclusion that 440hz is not good for singing at the top of your range... That is why the diapason standard was set at 435Hz back in 1859. Orchesters/concert halls wanted to go higher to create more brightness and cut (loudness) but limited the singers ability to get a great ...



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