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1

The gliss hurts; cheap strings, hit too hard - after half a second or so they settle down to tuning (ish), but both 1 & 2 are a bit painful for me. I'm not sure I can bear to listen to 3... Edit 1 bar of 3, switched it off. Answer to the question... "Yes, they are out of tune"


1

This is common for all guitars, with and without a tremolo, in my experience. I have noticed this happen on my acoustic and two different electrics. The guitar's neck is angled so the tension of the strings, when in tune, will cause it to assume the correct shape. Without strings, the neck will relax and be straighter/longer than it would be when strung. ...


4

Sound in tune to me. The second example is a semitone down on standard 440Hz pitch,but still in tune. It may be that Russian tuning is/was not the same as Western standard, but still in tune with itself. Spot the 7 string guitars? Standard low B strung when I bought mine in Leningrad, in 1964 !! So it's not such a modern idea. The videotapes must be 40-50 ...


0

Tremolo systems are a balancing act between strings and springs, especially if you've set it so it goes down and up. Eddie Van Halen, for example, has his Floyd Rose set to only go down, so (among other things) he can use a Drop-D add-on without throwing the whole setup out of balance. To recap and reiterate: If you're rocking a whammy-bar guitar, look into ...


4

A similar question to this was asked over the last couple of weeks. I guess the guitar has a vibrato. In this case, as the strings are loosened, it makes the springs in the vibrato relatively stronger, thus they pull the remaining strings tighter, and so, higher in pitch.This is a phenomenon associated with vibratos (trems), and is basically the nature of ...


1

Drop tuning is totally trendy right now, every new metal band seems to use it, I tried to cover all the reasons why, because I love to use it as well: Easy to play Drop Tuning is very easy to play. It does not only provide the possibility to play most chords with only one finger, but also typical progressions in the metal genre are closer to each other ...


0

An important factor is the loudness of the string. This done'st change the note, of coures, but the tuner will be only sensitive to so much of the string's "note life"- that is : You pluck the string. The attack in the note tells the tuner to start 'listening' for a note. The tuner can gather something while the signal is clear and strong As the note dies ...


0

I've noticed this and I really think it's simply due to the fact that over time the loudness of the note tapers off, so the tuner is less able to accurately pickup the tone with its microphone.


0

The fact you have picked up on this shows you have a good ear, here are some tips to make your guitar ring like an angel :) Make sure you have a good tuner that is accurate, (doesn't have to be expensive). Read plenty of reviews on it don't just go buy one. Always tune turning up, if you overshoot go back and start again. This makes sure there is no ...


1

Aside from the "Drop-D" issue, definitely DO get into the habit of doing your own string replacement and tuning. Besides gaining the experience, even the best guitars need re-tuning several times with new strings until they settle in and stretch out. You can help this along by changing one string at a time, so the neck tension is only changing a little at a ...


0

You do a full bar and have the power chord ring while you play melody type things on the other strings. The guitarist from Billy Talent does that pretty good. In classical music you rely heavy on the bass note ringing. So if you drop the E you get an entirely new note that rings and brings a new key to an E centered instrument.


1

Not sure if this was mentioned, but some piano tuners like to "float" the pitch. Floating the pitch means tuning A4 slightly flat in the winter and slightly sharp in the summer. The rational is that if you tune a piano in the summer, it will eventual go flat in the winer, so if you tune it sharp, then it will settle close to A440 as the humidity drops. ...


4

Assuming strings have been bedded in, and all are properly in tune to standard, then the whole guitar is in balance. That is, the strings exert a tension against the neck and the vibrato system, usually springs. When one string is changed, that balance is changed. Lowering a string pitch will loosen that string, so the opposing part of the balance becomes ...


1

Is the guitar in tune with itself(ie 5th fret low E string == A string etc)? If this is the case the problem may be with your tuner.


1

If it has a tremolo that is not set flush to the guitar body, then retuning one will affect the tuning of the others, by altering the overall tension against the springs.


1

If the strings are nylon then they will require many days of constant retuning before they stabilise


0

I don't see what's wrong with an FFT display, so long as your analog-to-digital converter is capable of covering at least 4 times the frequency range of interest. Any decent oscilloscope-emulator application will let you place a "marker" at the exact reference frequency desired, so all you need to do is trim your tube until the FFT peak(s) of interest line ...


1

Yes, your teacher is very correct there. When you tune down, it outside slack on the strings, and gears! This means your guitar's tuning may go below the level you wanted. If you want to avoid tuning down, I recommend purchasing a chromatic/guitar tuner. This helps you to reach near perfect pitch, so you should tune down less.


5

You rather want a stroboscopic tuner. There are a number of applications for them (I won't mention names), but the principle is just that the application converts the current amplitude into brightness and plots the brightness in an oscilloscope-like manner over a circular or linear scale repeating with the exact target frequency. You can then see the ...


1

One use for the bypass is when recording. The pedal then acts as a split box, the output is sent to e.g. an amp, while the bypassed signal could be sent to e.g. a re-amp box, which allows recording of the "clean" signal. This allows the track to be recorded again, with a different amp, the same amp on a different setting, sent to modelling software, ...


5

The bypass jack bypasses the switch on the pedal so you when you engage the tuner you don't cut the signal. In a live situation you are usually going to want to be silent when you tune, so you should use the regular output to your amp/effects. Only use bypass if you want the signal to be heard even when you are tuning. This might be useful at home so you can ...


1

If the upper register is consistently sharp and the lower register flat, there is a chance (however small) that you have a mouthpiece that is ill matched to the trumpet. Have an experienced trumpet player try your trumpet and mouthpiece together. If you have a mismatch problem, your setup will exhibit the same intonation problem to a different player. If it ...


1

Because the oboe player can sound the A with only one hand. The left hand, of course, being busy holding a tuning fork to his/her hear. I have not been able to find any online source for this, but I heard it from a normally trustworthy source. Makes a lot of sense to me. Of course, the matter of why we tune to the A4 to begin with is related... Nowadays, ...



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