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2

While A440 is the standard today (with a growing tendency to increase Hz by Hz in orchestra), it has not always been. In Renaissance and Baroque there was a wild variety of reference tones depending on the region, frequently 415 and even low as 391 Hz. So obviously, if you want to play repertoire from that time, it is a consideration, to adjust the ...


0

As pointed out in the video you posted, many instruments are tuned with some compromise built in for various reasons. The reason for tuning to a frequency other than A=440 can be different depending on the instrument. Harmonica's are tuned to a specific key unlike a piano which is tuned so that it can be played in any key. The reason some harmonica ...


1

If you're used to tuning a viola, you'll be used to the sound of bowed strings, a sound with perfectly pitched overtones (i.e. if you play a note with basic pitch 440Hz, you'll hear 440, 880, 1320, 1760, 2200...). Plucked strings, like a guitar or piano (or pizzicato violin playing) create overtones which are not precise multiples of the base frequency, the ...


-2

IF you're suspect of your tuner... get a new tuner! Good ones are dirt cheap these days, I prefer ones that clip on to the headstock. I also pick up and restore throw away guitars, so I feel your pain where your tuner says it's in tune, but as you play chords it sounds like dookie. This is the intonation of the instrument, which you can check via 6th/E ...


1

Your first step in tuning a string to a reference by ear is to determine where the strings are in relation to each other. Do you need to tune it up or down? You have to train your ear to recognize which tone is higher and which is lower. That's fairly easy - it might take you a few weeks or months if you practice a few hours a day. Just remember that you ...


1

I always use the reference string method if I don't have any other tuning reference to hand. Using the 4th/D string as your reference string you can make the following comparisons: 6th/E string 10th fret = D string open 5th/A string 5th fret = D string open 3rd/G string = D string 5th fret 2nd/B string = D string 9th fret 1st/E string = D string 2nd ...


5

Since you are a beginner, I would strongly suggest you start with an electronic tuner. Take one and tune you guitar and then see how it's supposed to sound when it's tuned correctly. Play the natural harmonics over the 5th and the 7th frets and listen to the correct sound. Or, you can try playing the 5th fret and the open string below (these are supposed to ...


5

It can depend on a couple of factors; amongst them, how good your ear is & how accurately the guitar is set up. The method that removes the most drift would be to tune each string to a played note on a piano or against a tuner. That way any inaccuracy would not be exacerbated as you move down the strings. If you tune by fretting one string & ...


3

If you play guitar, when you tune your instrument, is it always A440? Usually, the tuners have settings for the Hz. You can choose 440 or 441 or something else. So, in order to correctly tune in A440 Hz, you have to set your tuner to that frequency. Usually, that's the default setting in tuners, and unless you change it yourself, you'll be tuning in ...


2

"A440" means that the pitch "A" is defined as a note that vibrates at the rate of 440 times per second. The international scientific unit for cycles per second is "Hertz", abbreviated "Hz". So you would usually see it expressed as "A = 440Hz". This standard of defining the note A as vibrating at 440Hz only came in to common usage a bit more than 100 years ...


1

Any single string creates harmonics as it rings. Up to eight parts a C would generate C C G CEG Bb and C, essentially a dominant 7th chord. The lower partials are louder and than the upper partials due to string length influencing volume. A longer portion of the string vibrating will be louder. Tempered tuning requires that octaves and fifths sound good ...


1

The reason for tuning an instrument a certain way is always for playability reasons (and instrument construction/design/purpose). One could certainly make the argument that a particular instrument belongs to a certain family but it doesn't fully answer the question- the same question still applies- why does that family get tuned a certain way. "Just because" ...


35

It is because the double bass, essentially, comes from a different family of instruments than the cello, viola and violin. This is a controversial assertion among music historians, as these things evolved continously, but many scholars do not consider the double-bass to be a part of the violin family at all. The argument goes like this: About two ...


6

The early history (from about 1500 to 1850) of bass tunings are very variable, with anything from 3 to 6 strings and tunings in anything from thirds to fifths. Reference. In the classical period, the virtuoso Domenico Dragonetti played a 3-string bass tuned C G D an octave below the cello, which was more or less the standard instrument that Haydn, Mozart ...


25

With long open strings, the span to reach notes especially at the nut end would be too much for a lot of players if it retained the 5ths pattern of tuning. Making the tuning in fourths means that the left hand can encompass three notes in a scale and then move across to the next string in the same hand position. That said, it's not difficult to slide up a ...


0

Actually, the most popular tuning these days is the C/C# box or even a C#/D The layout of a C/C# allows superior ornamentation and fewer bellows changes. When I started playing my B/C, I looked for a teacher here and was told nobody plays B/C. Then there are the Irish 3-row boxes that are B/C/C#


9

I can think of two reasons: Bass is difficult enough the way it is. If you were to play it like a cello, you would need a) much more frequent position changes, and/or b) a strong, independent and wide-reaching (much wider than on cello with its shorter scale) pinky. I think most bassists never use the pinky on its own at all (or do they?), because a bass ...


0

I use the method I got from the 'Recommended methods' section here. It's based on using the same reference note all the time, e.g. high E. So given that this is in tune, you adjust: B string by checking against the 5th fret E and open high E G string by the 9th fret E and open high E D with 14th fret E (I tend to use 2nd fret E) A with 7th fret E Low E by ...


1

Many years of being a guitar picker,one thing I will state, if you buy a new guitar and it plays good but on the first change of the strings you begin to notice detuning ,most guitar pickers after many years of picking don't know.If the guitar was set up with light weight or what ever gauge strings from the factory and you change the strings to a different ...


3

I'm used to the first couple frets being sharp so I'm not sure why yours are flat, but otherwise it's very common. It's pretty much impossible for a fretted instrument to have perfect intonation - it's always a compromise. Since it's an electric guitar, you can individually adjust the intonation of each string any time you want. This is done at the bridge ...


3

You should go to a professional guitar repair technician or luthier. They can look at it and give you a quick assessment of what is probably wrong for no charge. I would guess that the nut of the guitar, and the string slots, are cut wrong. Modifying the nut and fret slots, or replacing the nut entirely and then hand-cutting the fret slots, is not a very ...


1

Most DAWs have speed and pitch controls or plug-ins that you can use for this. It will most likely be a process of trial and error to determine exactly how much you want to shift any given recording. I would personally tune up an instrument or use a keyboard alongside the DAW and try to compare the tuning while playing along. You could also try watching an ...



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