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I have three high end Martin Guitars, a D-41 (1993), Custom HD28 1934 copy (1979), A D-18 1937 Authentic (2010) and an Aria D-150 (custom with Brazilian rose wood and Engleman top) which is probably the best made of the bunch. ALL THE GUITARS GO OUT OF TUNE WHEN I PUT THE CAPO ON. Even though it's slight, and some strings don't need any retuning, depending ...


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jbm had some great points. As did a few others. I see that this post is an old one, but the question does come up frequently. So here's my 2 cents (no pun intended). First, nice piano.  Second, always talk to your tuner immediately upon discovering any topic of concern.  The sooner, the better.  Then my recommendation is to get a temperature and humidity ...


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See this previous post of mine. And this one from @slim. They both refer you to a PDF guide published by the D'Addario String Company which provides a comprehensive resource for determining which gauges strings to use for different guitar-family instruments of different scale lengths and tuning schemes. It also takes into account different types of ...


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If you want a really technical discussion that uses serious math, you can get Richard Mark French, Engineering the Guitar. (It's available as an ebook on Kindle.) He deals with scale length, intonation, the physics of ideal and real strings, etc., etc. The math is, frankly, beyond me, but it is an exhaustive treatment.


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There might be a second question here, which regards the internal tuning of the cello strings, relative to itself. Cellos are typically tuned in fifths (C-G-D-A) of course, but there are pieces that require a different tuning (a technique called scordatura). In this case, wikipedia mentions that Bach's 5th Cello Suite was written for a scordatura in which ...


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These days many musicians who play Baroque music such as Bach tune their instruments down to the lower pitch of A=415, which is exactly one half-step below the modern standard of A=440. It is generally accepted by modern performers of early music in the historically-informed style that A=415 was the tuning that Bach himself used for the string pieces he ...


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The strings are under tension via the machine heads. There is often a bit of slack in the gears. By tuning straight down to D, the slack isn't taken up. By going a bit further down, then coming back up to D, the slack is taken out. Also, the strings are being loosened, and need to go too loose, then tightened up to pitch. Some guitars may not have a problem, ...


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As MarkM pointed out, your claim is unsubstantiated. Consider further that "concert pitch" is not a fixed value. In the Good Old Days of Yesteryear, middle-A could be anything from 409Hz on up ( Wikipedia). Whether any particular YouTube recording was pitch-shifted in postprocessing is unknown.


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Maybe you could point out which videos you're listening to. Period tuning is sometimes lower than A 440, but from a random sample of top results in youtube I found: Mischa Maisky : ...


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I've noticed a drop in tune in two places when I change my strings. 1: After I change a string and move on to the next one. 2: It drops again after I cut the excess string off after I'm done changing them all. I've found that after getting the string to pitch, tune it up a half-step and some change. This helps compensate the loss on my electric with ...


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To the best of my knowledge, Finale and its sound libraries do not support anything other than 12-tone equal-temperament at A=440 Hz. However, you can purchase the full version of the stand-alone Garritan Personal Orchestra program and use it with Finale in place of the built-in Finale sounds. Garritan Personal Orchestra's ARIA playback engine can be used ...


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Plucking a string increases its tension momentarily. This tension drops rapidly as the vibration dies out. This causes the pitch to drop slightly as the string vibrates. It's an inherent limitation of plucked string instruments but it's OK, it's part of the sound we know and love. Also, unlike the ideal mathematical model, strings vibrate in two dimensions. ...


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You should tune it a little sharp not just the exact note, because this is going to happen over and over again. Why? because the tuning pegs use to turn by their own (it depends on the quality of the gears), you can't notice it because it takes time, take in count that you add tension to the strings every time you play. I hope this helps BTW if you ...


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Try to make your bottom snare head tight and also the snare wire.Give some more importance to snare head.my suggestion is dry drum head. Don't place a monitor speaker direction straight to snare drum.



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