New answers tagged

0

I've never seen pegs like that before and honestly I would recommend going to a violin maker's place and having them make new pegs for you. I had some really awful wooden pegs once and when I went in it only took a few minutes for him to size new pegs for my instrument. Also a note on the other answer (because I can't comment) another quick way to deal with ...


13

I wish I could point you to some scientific studies; I cannot. But I can speak on the basis of a lifetime of my being a semi-professional traditional choral singer and soloist who has a university music school degree in singing. I have extensive experience with a cappella choral singing, with singing accompanied by piano and organ and orchestra, and even ...


-2

I disagree with your premise that a mathematically perfect tuning would be somehow preferable and that singers would naturally gravitate towards that. Singing is a learned behavior. We gravitate towards tunings and scales that are familiar from our experience. If I grow up singing along with a piano in common tuning, playing major and minor scales, and then ...


1

It would be a more expensive upgrade, but do you know about PegHeds? They are actual geared tuners (like a banjo or guitar tuner) that have the external appearance of traditional friction pegs. The PegHeds company website doesn't have a lot of detailed information, but your local musical instrument repair person may have information on PegHeds for ukulele. ...


2

On a friction ukulele tuning peg, the standard solution to slipping of the peg (not holding the tuning tension) is to tighten the screw at the end of the peg button. Other things to check are to be sure your string has enough turns around the post so that the string itself is not slipping on the tuning post as well as a proper knot at the bridge to be ...


1

The squeaks are nothing to worry about. As the string is tightened, it travels through the nut. It sometimes squeaks a little, just like a tennis shoe squeaks on a floor. No biggie. If it really bothers you, next time you change the strings, put some graphite in the nut. It works as a lube.


2

Apparently nylon Lyre strings are not readily available but I was able to locate one on-line seller offering the equivalent of nylon Lyre strings. From the site: These modern Fluorocarbon strings are a better alternative to plain nylon and are very popular with harp and ukulele as they produce a clear and strong sound, On lyres this is very effective ...


1

A very easy way to hear what some of these tunings sound like would be to use one of the many polyphonic pitch-shifters now available from Electro-Harmonix with a standard six string guitar;the PitchFork pedal would probably be the cheapest, though it doesn't cover the range of some of the larger pedals.


3

In terms of frequency ratios "flattening" is not "subtracting" at least not mathematical subtraction. In the way that you are expressing it the mean tone fifth would be (3/2)/[ (81/80)**(1/4)]=1.495... The reduction is achieved by division. Often you want to think about things in terms of cents: a logarithmic measure of pitch. By working with these the ...


2

Mathematically, everything about pitch is logarithmic. "Adding a perfect fifth" really means "multiply the pitch by 3/2. So "subtracting a syntonic comma" means multiplying by the reciprocal of the comma; and "a quarter of" means the fourth root of. So try working out: 3/2 x 4th-root(81/80) ...and see if this is more like the correct answer. (I haven't ...


8

There are pieces of software available that can transpose pieces of music (I used to use Adobe Audition, although it did take a long time for the software to export the transposed music). Alternatively, you could use a capo on fret 1 and play as you normally would, only 1 fret higher. If you're not playing chords (or if you're good at bar-chords) you could ...


1

At issue are many factors. In broad strokes these include Intonation, String quality, Tuner Quality (Thanks @CarlWitthoft). Intonation: Intonation, in this context, is the fixed tuning of the instrument. This can be adjusted on electric guitars at the bridge. Guitar repair shops will do this setup on electric guitars for a price. Shops around me call it a ...


3

Tuning a guitar properly after new strings are installed (even if at the factory) works best if you follow the process I will outline below. First, be sure the strings are installed properly. Each string should wrap around the tuning post at least four times and not overlap. Otherwise the string is more likely to slip on the tuning post. Here is a ...


2

Try to find on each string a sequence of notes that changes with the chords in such a way that on every chord you're playing either the root or the fifth. Keep on the recording on, play that harmony voice to it and correct the intonation as necessary. It tends to be easiest if you deliberately start out with all strings a bit too low, and then tune upwards ...


7

I'm not sure how well I can turn this into an answer, but… If the entire guitar starts off flat & you tune from high E down to low E, lifting each string to pitch as you go, then by the time you've reached low E, the entire tension across the guitar has increased, which will pull the neck forwards slightly & also any tremolo system you may have - ...


1

Sounds like you captured some magic that would be easier to expand upon than replicate or re-create. You made a recording. Transfer that recording to another device (your computer maybe) so you can use the same recorder to make a new recording. Play back the recording you made while listening with headphones. Find a spot on the recording where you can ...


2

Just to offer an alternative that has yet to be mentioned, You caught this recording/echo with some friends, right? Maybe one of your buddies has their instrument still in tune with the recording, and you could "keep the candle lit" so-to-speak by tuning to another instrument that was used in the "making of."


0

Tune it One step down and consult a good guitar mechanic ASAP to get the bridge fixed. This sort of problem must not occur in future.


4

Use a freeze pedal or freeze function in any slow-downer application or digital recording application to stretch out any note into a continuous tone, the higher the better. Then take your tuner and look at the pitch of the frozen note. The frozen note will be 50 cents or less away from concert pitch. Then recalibrate your tuner to the pitch of the ...


1

Ear solution: Assumption: You know what was played on the recording, the notes, the key, the chords, the scale etc. preparation: To help, start with your guitar tuned to standard pitch (a tuner). Procedure: Pick form that set of notes and chords, one that best defines the key* (Select the root in the best case.) With guitar in hand, play the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included