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Strings for these instruments were, historically, made from sheep gut or cow gut. With each instrument there is a point at which it isn't possible to make a thinner string that could be tuned higher. Such a string would be too weak and would break just from tuning it up to pitch. So the solution was to use a string tuned an octave lower in its place. I ...


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Different reasons in different instruments. For ukeleles, it's simply that they were based on an instrument without reentrant tuning, but made in such a way whereby the lowest string could not practically be made. The instrument players wanted an instrument where the chord positions were still possible, and hey presto, you get a uke. The ukelele was based ...


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Edouard provided a perfect explanation. I don't have to add anything to that. Just a couple of comments: I would be very surprised if your digital piano was tuned with sharp low notes and flat high notes. Perhaps the samples Roland uses for the high notes have particularly strong (flat) harmonics and you are sensitive to them? It would be interesting if ...


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I know that you state that you are not looking for "workarounds", but I should point this out. There is indeed not a properly-supported means of doing microtonality within the MIDI specification itself. However, there is an extremely well-established and widely-accepted and implemented system for microtonality with synthesizers and virtual instruments ...


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The MIDI Tuning Standard allows for arbitrary remapping of all 128 note values. It was ratified in 1992, and can be implemented by both GM and GM2 devices. (Very few do, however.) There are also Scale/Octave Tuning messages, which allow slight adjustments to the 12 tones in an octave. Only these are required by GM2.


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There's scattered support for other 12-tone temperaments, but MIDI just isn't going to be able to work with tuning systems with more notes. It's an issue of the amount of information that a MIDI message can encode--the existing standard is for a 7-bit (128-value) note number, which is enough to encode over 10 octaves of 12-tone, but only 5 octaves of ...


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Just intonation does produce harmonic sounds; perhaps the most harmonic sounds possible. You are correct that for a Justly tuned system to work, then each of the tones that you use will need to be adjusted relative to the current tonic. Because of this, you are correct to think that there will need to be many different 'flavors' of each note, depending on ...


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While A440 is the standard today (with a growing tendency to increase Hz by Hz in orchestra), it has not always been. In Renaissance and Baroque there was a wild variety of reference tones depending on the region, frequently 415 and even low as 391 Hz. So obviously, if you want to play repertoire from that time, it is a consideration, to adjust the ...


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As pointed out in the video you posted, many instruments are tuned with some compromise built in for various reasons. The reason for tuning to a frequency other than A=440 can be different depending on the instrument. Harmonica's are tuned to a specific key unlike a piano which is tuned so that it can be played in any key. The reason some harmonica ...


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If you're used to tuning a viola, you'll be used to the sound of bowed strings, a sound with perfectly pitched overtones (i.e. if you play a note with basic pitch 440Hz, you'll hear 440, 880, 1320, 1760, 2200...). Plucked strings, like a guitar or piano (or pizzicato violin playing) create overtones which are not precise multiples of the base frequency, the ...


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IF you're suspect of your tuner... get a new tuner! Good ones are dirt cheap these days, I prefer ones that clip on to the headstock. I also pick up and restore throw away guitars, so I feel your pain where your tuner says it's in tune, but as you play chords it sounds like dookie. This is the intonation of the instrument, which you can check via 6th/E ...


1

Your first step in tuning a string to a reference by ear is to determine where the strings are in relation to each other. Do you need to tune it up or down? You have to train your ear to recognize which tone is higher and which is lower. That's fairly easy - it might take you a few weeks or months if you practice a few hours a day. Just remember that you ...


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I always use the reference string method if I don't have any other tuning reference to hand. Using the 4th/D string as your reference string you can make the following comparisons: 6th/E string 10th fret = D string open 5th/A string 5th fret = D string open 3rd/G string = D string 5th fret 2nd/B string = D string 9th fret 1st/E string = D string 2nd ...


5

Since you are a beginner, I would strongly suggest you start with an electronic tuner. Take one and tune you guitar and then see how it's supposed to sound when it's tuned correctly. Play the natural harmonics over the 5th and the 7th frets and listen to the correct sound. Or, you can try playing the 5th fret and the open string below (these are supposed to ...


5

It can depend on a couple of factors; amongst them, how good your ear is & how accurately the guitar is set up. The method that removes the most drift would be to tune each string to a played note on a piano or against a tuner. That way any inaccuracy would not be exacerbated as you move down the strings. If you tune by fretting one string & ...



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