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4

Compared to standard musical notation on a 5 line staff, tabs are fairly easy to learn. They only work for a stringed instrument such as a ukulele or guitar. There is probably some good information on the internet that will give very detailed information on reading tablature. Try this one How To Read Ukulele Tab But I will point out a few things that ...


8

A D7 chord consists of: D - the root note - if you leave it out the chord is ambiguous, but you might fix that by having another instrument, your voice, or the listener's imagination, fill it in. When you're the only accompaniment, however, you typically want the tonic as one of the lowest notes in your chord, as an anchor (this is why bass guitars often ...


3

There are two common ukulele chords called D7. The traditional D7 chord is the barre chord: This chord has all four of the D7 notes: D, F♯, A, C The other D7 chord is a common alternative on the ukulele: This form of the D7 chord is often called the Hawaiian D7, perhaps because it is popular in Hawaii. As others have noted, it is missing the D note. ...


9

The D7 chord is D (root), F♯ (major 3rd), A (perfect 5th), C (minor 7th). Any voicing that includes all four of those is correct. For example, the barre fingering is A–D–F♯–C, which is correct. Furthermore, the chord is in root position on a soprano or concert ukulele – meaning that the root is the lowest-pitched note – which is ideal for playing ...


2

You can easily check what 4 notes are played in each chord if you know your musical alphabet. If you have the same notes in both, but in different orders, they are just different voicings of the same chord and it comes down really to choice or how they sound in each song you use them in. Assuming your uke is tuned A-E-C-G then your first version has notes ...


1

Stringed instruments have several different places where you can play the same note. If you look at some guitar chord charts (as an example) you can see there are many different fingerings for a given chord. Different inversions, different mixtures of open and fretted notes, different octaves involved, etc. None of these fingerings is necessarily ...



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