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12

When I first started working on lead guitar, I spent a lot of time just listening to famous players phrasing and vibrato. I knew that an important part of playing lead was developing a "voice" for my guitar, that stood out, was pleasing, and sounded natural. One of the attributes of vocalists who's style I like is a more relaxed vibrato. Some singers have ...


8

All of the brass teachers I know (including myself) teach the jaw method. I find it preferable to the other two methods because: Diaphragmatic vibrato is going to disturb your support and airstream. Moving the fingers back and forth is just smushing the mouthpiece against your face, which runs the risk of fatiguing your embouchure earlier or letting air ...


7

Since the recorder is a type of flute that doesn't have an embouchure which affects pitch, all you have control over is the speed of the airstream. As a result, recorder vibrato is executed by adding pulses to the airstream at a regular interval. Since the airstream should be driven by the diaphragm, we call this diaphragmatic vibrato. Locate your ...


6

What you are referring to is vibrato, not tremolo. All singers use some amount of vibrato. These days the use of strong vibrato is mostly associated with opera singing, but this was not always the case. Vibrato helps you sing louder, and with less fatigue to the voice. Some singers learn to sing with a little vibrato or a lot, and learn how to control how ...


6

To me, Vibrato is divided into 2 parts: Physical Phrasing PHYSICAL Beginners usually get shown techniques where the string is moved laterally across the strings or in the same direction as the strings. What I end up seeing is a student who is confused as to what their hand and finger(s) are actually meant to do to the string to produce the desired ...


6

Vocal style I think the confusion here is that there are many different kinds of vibrato, with playing techniques that differ from instrument to instrument and a style and nature that relates both to the instrument and the style of music you are playing. In general, the "classical voice" has a wide unconstrained vibrato, while the "jazz/pop" voice has a ...


6

You can learn to control your vibrato with study with a professional voice teacher. You need feedback from a professional who can analyze what you are doing and help you control it. I'm 49 years old, and my voice seems to be much like yours. I've always had a lot of natural vibrato. I sang in choirs all my teen years. I went to music school and got a ...


5

From a personal perspective, my vibrato started coming out after learning good breath support from the diaghram. If I kept my throat relaxed and held a note in a comfortable area of my voice range, the vibrato would kick in. It almost felt like hitting a sweet spot - a balance between diaghram control and vocal chord control. Once I could evoke it ...


4

I think you're definitely magnifying the problem beyond it's perceptibility, vibrato is generally much too fast for the instantaneous difference to be heard at all. In fact, it's generally much easier to be in tune with vibrato than without. The natural fuzziness of a vibrated pitch generally makes it blend more pleasingly and there's nothing more difficult ...


3

There is indeed! (at 1m46s) I don't believe they're widely manufactured though, not from what I could find


3

Long fingernails would present a problem to violinists, since they would interfere with the correct finger posture and prevent the finger-tip pressing the string to the finger-board, but these problems would show up even without vibrato. And your fingernails do not look too long. My advice would be to see a teacher and to just keep trying. Try slow ...


3

Vibrato is your friend. All singers, in any style of music, could benefit from learning to use a little vibrato because singing with vibrato is less fatiguing on the voice than singing with nothing but a "straight tone". When singers suffer vocal damage, it's often because they have sung for years with no vibrato and don't know how to use vibrato and control ...


3

Start by giving yourself the most advantage: Location on a string: Start with all your fingers fretting notes on the same string in the middle of the neck. The closer to the 12th fret you are, the more it is possible to move the note. String selection: Start with a string where you can get a good grip on the string (a wound string). I recommend the 4th ...


2

Vibrato is more or less a natural phenomenon once you are singing with nice support and a relaxed larynx. It's absurd that you would have to learn it at some given age: it more or less comes with a well-tended voice at whatever age. Vibrato can be produced somewhat artificially by conscious breath and throat actions but that is rarely convincing and often ...


2

Well, I don't think the first claim is true. I didn't know how to do vibrato until I was 19. I'm 23 now and I'm still improving it. And I have a very low pitch voice. My dad learned how to do vibrato only in his 50s. But, I don't really know how I really learned it. I was experimenting with my voice one day, and it got easier the more I played with it. It's ...


2

Good question and an important one --rather than offering my own personal views I suggest that one start by listening widely to other players, and not only bassoon players. For example, the fluctuation in pitch that is so characteristic of vibrato on the cello or violin may not be as attractive on the bassoon ---listen to terrific players and start to form ...


2

I'm not exactly sure what action you're making, but the proper vibrato action is similar to that used on guitars - classical, rather than electric.Although the recognised classical vib. action works on electric, too. Making a claw shape, knuckles up, rest your fingertips on a hard surface - a table, maybe.Lift up three, leaving one tip on the table.Middle ...


2

You need weekly lessons with a good, qualified teacher to develop vibrato and learn to control it. There is no substitute for lessons in person with a teacher. Conversely, a very few people have a lot of vibrato in their voice, naturally and with no training. That was me as a young man. I had to get a voice teacher to teach me to reduce and control my ...


2

Vibrate your soft palette to interrupt the airflow - a back-of-the moth growl applied to a Scottish ch "loch" consonant. Your tonguing and embouchure continues uninterrupted, also learn to move the airflow around your mouth (much as you probably do in adjusting your embouchure to sometimes play from the side of your lips to get a stronger attack).


2

Since asking the question I have discovered an excellent series of tutorials on classical guitar vibrato technique by Douglas Niedt. Here is a link to the first video. One technique he describes (which I did not know was possible) is adding vibrato on open strings and harmonics by fretting the same note, maybe in a lower octave, on another string and ...


1

If it's anything like saxophone (which I'm sure it is) you just gotta add some controlled pulses in your air flow. Kinda like 'who who who'...


1

I'm not entirely sure I understand your problem, your fingernails look fine to me. In my experience with vibrato, when you use a wrist motion, your finger will oscilate more than it would with a forearm motion. Try to make sure you never go higher than the pitch you intend - only lower. I don't know if I expressed myself clearly, it's one of those things ...


1

I'm not sure this is really an answer, but probably I'll ramble on for way too long to be a comment. Tremelo/vibrato can be stylistic or masking; blending or highlighting. Genre will also dictate which of these may be 'compulsory' for that style. Opera, for instance, appears to make it almost mandatory [not a genre I'm a fan of] I've heard many instances ...


1

Some of the Bigsby vibs will do the job.Particularly those designed for semis. They may be kinder to an acoustic guitar because they attach to the part of the guitar where the knob is for the strap, rather than on the belly itself. Watching the above video, it was difficult to tell whether the soundboard was being moved as the arm worked, or whether it was ...


1

I was taught by some splendid teachers that a relaxed voice will produce a moderate, pleasing vibrato, or spin. It is actually more work to produce a flat (not pitch wise) tone, though some music styles call for it, and it is often desirable for certain choral work. The natural spin is to be distinguished from a manufactured vibrato that requires a real ...


1

I can briefly explain what vocal vibrato means to me; it means that you are currently executing phonation with a perfect mouth shape and inner-space.. hence a natural vibrato is the result (it's not actually "forced"; but allowed to happen naturally). The first time I did it I was blown away.. because I didn't "do it". I practiced proper technique and one ...


1

Vibrato should usually be a natural phenomenon of a relaxed powerful voice but with the advent of amplification it has changed to more of a stylistic choice. Check out Nina Hagen's "Naturträne" and compare it with other songs from the same punk album (like "Unbeschreiblich weiblich"). It is obvious that her use of her operatically trained voice is both ...


1

I do not believe there is a universal answer. 1) It depends on what instrument you are playing. 2) It depends on the style of music you are playing on that instrument, and its time in music history. Certain styles of music at certain points in history used vibrato in a certain way, and others differently. In some styles of musical performance, vibrato is ...


1

Not an expert on this, but I think part of the answer would be deciding first what kind of effect are you trying to achieve with the vibrato. I'm a classical and fingerstyle guitarist, and I use different types of vibrato depending on the context of the music and musical effect that I need. Delaying the vibrato after the attack has the effect of "swelling" ...


1

Speaking as a layman (not professional) when it comes to singing, I've always been interested in sacred choral music since grade school back in the early 1960s. I've done a lot of research about singing on my own and, have been fortunate enough to sing in school and church choirs. And a little bit of professional vocal coaching along the way as a student. ...



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