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11

There is a shortcut, yes. The secret is to practice smart. I used to tell my students there is a difference between practicing and playing; between cleaning up all the difficulties and going into the small details, and playing just for fun or for others. The more time you spend in cleaning grey zones, being careful with sound quality, with fast exercises ...


10

When I was in choir in high school, a technique that clinicians and teachers from different events I was involved with used was just singing the rhythm. Pick a note for the student to play that is in a comfortable playing position and have them play the rhythm (without changing notes) throughout the piece. If the piece is accompanied then play the ...


7

When I was starting to learn the piano, my teacher told me to practice every scale I knew so far, every day, with a metronome set at a different tempo each time. After a month, he gave me some sheets that were just scales, but with different rhythms each, and he told me to do the same thing, practice everyday with a different tempo on the metronome. It ...


5

3/4 means three quarters size as opposed to full size. The tuning can be the same, but the scale length is different, which means string length and tension (and thickness) are different. So while you use the same techniques, the finger positioning will vary. The reason for these different size instruments is the difference in tonal quality. The resonant ...


5

I would like to point out 2 very inspiring people to me. First is Adrian Anantawan: Second is Casey Driessen: ...


5

The key signature should always fit nicely inside the staff for any key and any clef and are defined and standardized so it all looks the same no matter what piece you play. Putting the F# on the bottom line will put the C# on a ledger line or it will break the common pattern. This site shows what the standard key signatures for many diffrent keys on bass, ...


5

The slash symbol through the stem of a note is called a "tremolo" notation, and signals that the same pitch or chord is to be repeated at a certain rate. In your example, it is a shorthand for eighth notes. The half note signifies the length of time the notes will fill (in this case two beats). The stem plus the dots shows the division. Here is a good ...


4

A technique to concentrate entirely on the rhythm is to put away the instrument entirely, and clap the rhythm along with a metronome. You should also clap along to emphasize what would be the correct rhythm. You can vary this technique with the methods you have already tried with counting sub divisions etc.


4

The main differences I have noticed: Finger spacing/placement while shifting, especially during quick runs and large shifts, can take some adjusting to. Playing double stops greater than an eighth can be pretty hard on a viola, and playing full chords with all fingers where either the index or pinky isn't in first while the rest are is dang near impossible ...


4

Usually the three-quarter or other smaller than standard violins are for younger, smaller children. A full sized violin would be way too much for a three or four year old to handle. The bow is appropriately smaller, as well. The spoken lengths of the strings are obviously in proportion, and a child will have to re-adapt when it grows big enough for the next ...


4

As Reina pointed out, the slash is a kind of an abbreviated beam, indicating, that the note has to be played as repeated eigth notes (two slashes/beams would indicate 16th etc.). The dots are most likely the staccato dots for the resulting four eights, so nothing changes in comparison to the previous bars.


3

If you've got 11 years of guitar and theory, with time and devotion you can most certainly become a proficient violinist. I've got 6 years of music experience, and I picked up the cello a few months ago, and it's going well. The hardest thing about bowed string instruments is the bowing! If you buy your violin at a good respectable violin shop they will ...


3

For a given instrument (violin, viola, cello, bass is more complicated), the tuning of a fractional size instrument (1/16, 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 are commonly seen, 7/8 used to be frequently called "lady's cello") is always the same as the full size instrument. viola is a bit complicated because professionals have different sizes (15', 16', sometimes 17' for ...


3

Adding the extra string will add some difficulty, yes, as the string separation and neck width will change, and some of your subconscious muscle memory may need to be relearned/tweaked to cope with a different string being at the side. You will also need to relearn note spacings, but I can't see any major differences in difficulty from tension - the ...


2

There is a difference between a single slash and the several slashes for a tremolo. A half note with a slash through it in this case with the four dots underneath, is a shorthand meaning that you play four notes for each one written. So if you have half notes written and four dots then you play eighth notes.


2

1/4, 2/4... 4/4 are instrument proportion measurements. A child will often play in a 1,2 or 3 quarters of original size (4/4). Normally a professional instrument is a 4/4 size. The term 4/4 is most used in Schools/Student context. What changes between them is the string length, and with that the space between fingers to tune properly. The proportion between ...


1

I used to play stuff that was hand-written. The guy who wrote it put the key signature any old where. As long as we could count how many # or b there were, did it matter where they where? Of course not ! The 3 flats for Eb will always be Bb, Eb and Ab, and, yes, convention says in that order, and on those lines or spaces, but with 3 flats, it can only be Eb ...



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