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17

Your logic fits and, as some of the commentators have stated, I've pondered about this in the past. Usually your dominant hand naturally can handle doing a lot more work, like you've stated. In playing instruments, the dominant hand also should be used for doing the "big jobs": in drumming, the dominant hand would be hitting the hi-hats. In a normal 4/4 ...


16

The wood type in any stringed instrument matters a great deal, especially on acoustic instruments. Some parts of the violin contribute more to the overall tone quality than others, but all the parts make a difference. A stringed instrument is a case study in engineering trade-offs. After all, how does a violin produce its sound? To begin with, note that ...


15

Be sure not to wait too long. Reattaching a sound post, or at the worst, refitting a new one is a pretty standard operation. It is important for the sound quality and it also carries quite a bit of tension originating from the strings and the bridge. While some of it is also taken by the bass beam (running in parallel to the strings under the cover) in ...


12

Like with learning a foreign language, the brain gets worse at learning new things once a person has matured. The Suzuki method starts kids on musical instruments at around 4, but many start after that. I'd say that it's definitely possible to start in the late teens or after, but it'll be harder. You'll have better luck if you already know a different ...


12

There may be a small amount of "performance practice fad" about that, but for the most part it does serve a purpose. Breath is used in many styles of music as a cue. If you think about wind instrument players, for example, every phrase is preceded by a breath, and experienced players will take that breath in rhythm. As a rhythmic gesture, it can be used to ...


12

This technique is called Pizzicato. It's usually notated by just writing "pizz." above the notes that you are to play that way. The opposite off Pizzicato is Arco which simply means to use the bow.


12

There is a shortcut, yes. The secret is to practice smart. I used to tell my students there is a difference between practicing and playing; between cleaning up all the difficulties and going into the small details, and playing just for fun or for others. The more time you spend in cleaning grey zones, being careful with sound quality, with fast exercises ...


11

When I was in choir in high school, a technique that clinicians and teachers from different events I was involved with used was just singing the rhythm. Pick a note for the student to play that is in a comfortable playing position and have them play the rhythm (without changing notes) throughout the piece. If the piece is accompanied then play the ...


11

Just to elaborate and clarify, there are a few different types of pizzicato: There is the standard "pizz." which is done with the flesh of the finger on the bowing hand; A pizz with fingernail, which gives a more crisp attack; A "Bartok" or "snap" pizz where the performer pulls the string away from the fingerboard and releases to produce a harsh snapping ...


11

The recorder is probably very poor - Adlers were made in what was East Germany and in my opinion were not well-designed or well made. In fact, you may have a German-fingered recorder which are all uniformly terrible. The fingering for low f-natural is usually T1234-67, i.e, forked, but for those German fingered recorders it's T12345. In order to make this ...


10

I've been trying to do just what you're discussing. I've owned a violin for several years and I'm still at the sucky stage. I'm beyond the skinning-the-cat stage, though. In transitioning from guitar to violin, there are three major differences: The tuning: Violins are (generally) tuned in fifths, not the fourths (mostly) that guitars are tuned in. This ...


9

I'm not sure whether learning violin is ultimately easier or harder as a young kid, but I guarantee you, teaching older people is much easier. The high school students I'm teaching now are also much easier to teach than I remember myself being at age six. As a result, their progress for the most part is faster than mine. Also, I've heard that the problem ...


9

As everything teaching "device" (and there is a lot of academic literature studying this, across disciplines, this is not specific to bowed string instruments), fingerboard tapes or any kind of marks on or on the side of the fingerboard should not : be used systematically without observation phase be permanent be used alone without having an exit strategy ...


9

I have a child who started school this year and also began learning violin this year. I personally have learnt guitar for over 20 years and can easily sight-read music. Prior to my son starting lessons I spent a few weeks trying to figure out how to play. I had access to many beginner lessons and color coded or numbered sheet music but this didn't help. I ...


8

In a real orchestra? It varies. Maybe 10 first violins, 10 second violins, 10 violas, 8 cellos, 6 double basses. Maybe 14, 14, 12, 12, 10. Mozart and Haydn had smaller orchestras so you may see 3, 3, 3, 2, 1, although they sound OK with a larger or smaller group. Not as many bass instruments are needed to balance the treble instruments. For late ...


8

That's definitely not the sound of a real violin (to me it sounds more like an oboe!), which may cause some confusion. It also has some kind of vibrato which will make tuning even more difficult. It should be able to help you get close, though, since the pitch is the correct E. Now, if your instrument has never been tuned before (or in a long time), it may ...


8

I've compared my fancy Korg multi-temperament orchestra tuner to various tuner apps available for Android on my Nexus 4, and I prefer the box every time. It's got much better sound detection, and because it's a fancy (and expensive) one there's no issue with support for reference pitches and temperaments (although all I regularly need is A440, A415, equal ...


8

Many things can enter in. Bow pressure can force a string out of tune. Try this: tune the open string bowed, then play the string with excessively heavy bow pressure. You'll go out of tune. Depending on the quality of the instrument, the bridge&soundpost setup, and the phases of Jupiter's moons, you may find that a perfectly tuned (bowed) open string ...


8

Guitars are already rich in overtones and harmonics. Experiment with the position of your right hand. Picking near the neck emphasises the fundamental frequency. Picking nearer the bridge brings out more overtones. The biggest differences between a guitar and a violin are the size of the instrument, and the fact that a violin is bowed. You could try ...


7

The main differences I have noticed: Finger spacing/placement while shifting, especially during quick runs and large shifts, can take some adjusting to. Playing double stops greater than an eighth can be pretty hard on a viola, and playing full chords with all fingers where either the index or pinky isn't in first while the rest are is dang near impossible ...


7

Mel Bay's Chart is pretty good. Violin online dot com has some useful charts too: chromatic for basic positions and diatonic for up to 7th position. It also features nice fingerboard diagram and photos. The diagram below basically puts Mel Bay's 'movable finger patterns' into a circle of fifths. All the 1's in it mean the tonic of (any) major scale, and it ...


7

When I was starting to learn the piano, my teacher told me to practice every scale I knew so far, every day, with a metronome set at a different tempo each time. After a month, he gave me some sheets that were just scales, but with different rhythms each, and he told me to do the same thing, practice everyday with a different tempo on the metronome. It ...


7

I'm about at the same point (maybe a little bit ahead, but not much), so I'll help with what I can. Violins are a bear to learn, for three reasons: intonation - Keyboards only have one note per key. Guitars have whatever note the fret and the tuning give. With violins, intonation is determined by your fingers. Unless you are a very special person, you ...


7

I'm not a violinist, but I am a professional trombonist. Although I can't give a specific answer to this question as it applies to violin performance in my own words, there does exist a study we call body mapping. Body mapping is basically human anatomy for performers as it relates to performance - it teaches you how to use your body correctly when ...


7

I understand your frustration. The pegs behavior is related with different factors. Most usual factors are: - weather changes (humid/dry weather); - bad adjustment between peg and peg hole; - when the pegs are long periods without being adjusted (because of use of fine-tuners or because the instrument is not played often). Some advices: If the peg ...


7

Standard tuning for solo violin in classical music is just intonation. Tune the A string and, from there, tune the other strings with just-intonated perfect fifths. Some times, as a compromise you may need to tune the violin temperate, for example when you need to play many open strings in duo/ensemble with a instrument not capable of just-intonation. ...


7

There are some things that will make you lose less: a big revelation for me was when I realized I was using way more bow and force than necessary. A combination of weight (literal weight, let gravity do more of the work than muscle) and a slow stroke using minimal bow length helped a lot. Also, the examples here are amplified; if possible, practice the ...


7

Viol consorts were certainly popular in England. This is fairly obvious from the number of English and England-based composers who produced vast quantities of music for such consorts. My inclination is to believe that they were more popular in England than most other places, but I may have a distorted viewpoint of that being an English viol player myself. ...


7

Sounds to me like the sound post. Normally held in place by friction, it's supposed to act like a pillar between the front and back of the violin, to provide structural support and enhance the sound quality by transmitting vibrations to the back of the instrument. It sounds like its pretty important, and should be a simple matter for a luthier to repair.


6

I think kids can definitely learn some things faster than adults and music might very well be one of those things, but we should take into account some other reasons why kids learn some things easier (aside from natural predisposition): Lots of free time: No job, mortgage, kids, spouse, etc. to worry about. Encouragement: Kids are expected to not be ...



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