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I'm a left handed guy with nearly 30 years of right handed guitar playing/teaching experience. I've always wondered if I should have learned leftie style. When learning it feels strongly that the fretting hand is the business end. But as you progress you learn what makes the difference between an OK player and a great player with individual style is the ...


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Slim's answer already covers some of this, but I just want to emphasize how massively rich in overtones any guitar is. Only a pure sine wave doesn't have overtones, any natural instrument is rich in them (in fact each overtone is a sine wave). The only spectral difference between a violin and a guitar lies in which overtones are most present, and what their ...


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Overdriven, distorted guitar sounds contain loads of harmonics, and tend to emphasise them quite well. By experimenting with these sorts of sounds, along with different pup settings, and plucking in different places on your strings, you may come close.Valve amps do it better, but there are several pedals also.


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Guitars are already rich in overtones and harmonics. Experiment with the position of your right hand. Picking near the neck emphasises the fundamental frequency. Picking nearer the bridge brings out more overtones. The biggest differences between a guitar and a violin are the size of the instrument, and the fact that a violin is bowed. You could try ...


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Yes. But not just time, its "playing hours tuned" that makes the difference. Wood is a soft material that adjusts with time, humidity etc. If you have a new instrument and play on it with good tuning (keeping same reference A, for example A = 440Hz) the sound quality and overtone richness will increase. You will get a more complete sound out of the ...


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Wood "lives". Certainly the sound of a wooden instrument can change over time. Most obvious, if the wood wasn't expertly selected and dried there's a high danger of deforming later, this will usually make the instrument worse overall. To some degree this can happen even in a good instrument if it's stored at extreme humidity or temperature conditions, again ...


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I once read about a project that scanned an antique Stradivarius in an MRI machine; a luthier used the resulting scan to produce the exact same violin out of new wood. In a blind test no preference was shown. Of course, the quality of strings, and in case of a violin, the bow, all add to the quality of the sound, along with the playing technique and hall. As ...


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This is how I do it, product of inputs from my colleagues, teachers and my own experiences: pre-note: if the bow hair does not hold the roisin, you have either very old bow hair, or have dirty bow hair. There are products to clean it, some say plain water is the best. I use hand soap (the solid one, less chemicals the best). #1 - put tension in the bow ...


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For an actually newly haired bow (unlikely in your case), it may help "sanding" the rosin a bit with a knife. Actual sandpaper might get a bit messy but is also possible. At any rate: you'll not be doing yourself a favor by using old rosin: after a few years it dries out and gets more dusty than sticky in its qualities, leading to a scratchy tone quality. ...


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I had the same question for my bow on my double bass. I guess the simplest answer is to try it out. Put a little rosin on your bow and play. If the bow hair does not 'stick' on the strings, it needs more; otherwise it is good to play. Put some more rosin and repeat step (1). Just be careful not to put too much rosin on the bow. If you put too much, ...



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