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i play viola, and my fingers hurt when i play for a long time, one thing i learned from one of my teachers is if you put a small amount of vasoline or chapstick on the tips of your fingers before you play it will help your fingers stop hurting, but a very small amount not too much where it would bamage the strings


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It's true that if you are holding the violin correctly, you should be able to support it comfortably between your collar bone and your chin without putting your hand on it. However you must not "squeeze" the instrument in any way, either by pushing down with your head, or hunching up your shoulder. Your shoulder and neck must be relaxed or tension will ...


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Accomplished musician does not always make an accomplished teacher. Pavarotti was a great singer, but I would not have brought my child within a mile radius of him. Domingo on the other hand, he would be a great teacher of children. There is more to a good teacher than just the mere mastery of the subject matter, (That is important though.) to me the ...


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Don't ask for it. Others have already pointed that the teacher's mechanical abilities have almost nothing to do with his pedagogical abilities. One more point that I would like to add - if you can't play the instrument, can you judge the musicians abilities? I don't know about you, but most people can't. I am a guitar player and can play a bit of keyboards ...


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If you want to go to one of their concerts that's probably a good idea. Most musicians have a youtube channel or soundcloud or something, so this really shouldn't be that hard. If I were asked by a potential student to play for them so that I could "prove my worth", honestly I'd probably be pretty offended. I would do it, but I would find it to be ...


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Possibly putting the cat amongst the pigeons here. An expert (at anything, be it sport, art, science, etc.) is often not a good teacher. A good teacher knows the subject, of course, but maybe hasn't the propensity to perform as well as an expert. Often, when someone is naturally good at someyhing, they will lack the empathy to understand why the students ...


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If it is possible, go to own of his/hers concerts. Most musicians (despite their musical style) play concerts. So, try to find out if the teacher you are interested in is playing a gig any day now and go and watch for yourself. Try to find others students of his, and ask them. This is more important to me, because a good musician doesn't equal a good ...


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There are two ways that come to mind: Find a violin teacher, whistle the melody to them and ask them to teach it to you. (Easiest way, but also requires money) Use a computer or a smartphone to record yourself whistling the melody. then use a transcription tool like "amazing slow downer", "music speed changer" or even "audacity" (open source) to slow the ...


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I've noted this myself, actually. As an anecdotal example: when I was younger I was lucky enough to get an antique German violin, heavily discounted due to damage, but it looked a lot worse than it was and my teacher knew someone who could restore it. After restoration, it was gorgeous, but it still sounded "stiff", for lack of a better word - no depth to ...


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If you use a heavy mute for a practise session on a good violin, the full sound of the violin will not recover right away afterwards but will take some playing without mute to do so. What causes this difference? The most obvious candidate of course is the bridge itself possibly needing recovery from the pressure of the mute, but it might also be the bridge ...


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This is a heavily-researched, and (sadly) highly inflammatory topic. There are some people who swear it takes 50 years for the varnish to reach a stable structure & stability; there are others who say it's due to the wood itself aging and "settling" in at the cellular level. I'm not aware of anyone who's had the time and the cash to put a couple ...


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You probably don't mean "legato" as much as you mean "arco" (namely bowed as opposed to plucked). Yes, using pizzicato and arco next to each other is quite possible as violinists don't necessarily put aside the bow when doing pizzicato. Paganini even combines bowing with simultaneous left-hand pizzicato (of course, this needs careful consideration of ...


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Absolutely; you just write a little marking to indicate to the performer when to switch between pizzicato and regular bowing. In the score, we use the call arco to signal that the performer should bow regularly. It's similar with brass instruments: a composer tells them to use a mute, and then a composer tells them when to quit using the mute. Note that ...


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These are called sympathetic vibrations, and they happen because the note you're playing is an overtone of one of the open strings. This can be demonstrated very reliably on a properly tuned piano: slowly press one key so that the damper is off but you don't sound the note, then while holding that slam the key an octave lower. The first note should ring ...


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This is not a problem since the tail piece is in equilibrium. However, check your fine tuners regularly. If they are close to the violin top, turn them out most of the way, coarse tune using the pegs, then adjust the fine tuners.


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The angle the tailpiece takes depends on several factors- the shape of the bridge as you mentioned, the various tensions of the strings, the height and number of fine tuners, etc. The only way to change the angle without changing the bridge or the strings is with the fine tuners: most violins are designed for having just one, so the tailpiece rides lower ...



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