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The name for the sounds you are describing are indeed called Subharmonics. They were discovered by violinist Mari Kimura in the early 1990's and first presented in 1994. As her website states, I first discovered the technique from an age-old bowing exercise, a modified version of "Son Filé", drawing the bow very slowly but applying slightly more ...


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As someone who first learned the piano and then learned guitar, I would say it would be best if you now learn piano. The reason for this is that once you understand the piano keyboard, music theory will become much more easy for you to understand because each note on the piano only has one place and the piano is designed to play all chord inversion easily. ...


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Well, don't fool yourself: violin is difficult. But... Personal experience: I was (at the age of 15) in a similar situation as you are now. Knew guitar, wanted to learn something more classical. I tried violin. And tried. And failed. Actually I didn't try that long, nor did I take professional lessons. But I really couldn't see it going anywhere. The ...


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The answer is to learn both. They are not exclusive of each other, and as you say, you're going to learn both eventually anyway. Both require development of your music reading skills. Spending time on the one will not detract from the study of the other. Virtually all advanced, university-level music programs require the student to have fundamental basic ...


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You could think about how you use the guitar most, if you mostly play to accompany yourself singing, the piano may be a better choice. If you treat the guitar as a solo (melodic) instrument, or regularly have other musicians to play with, the violin may be a better choice. For what it's worth, playing the piano develops and uses a lot more transferable ...


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Try a simplified test: Write out some scales, major, minor, up and down, and play them in unison with your violinist. Play them staccato, legato, pp and ff. See if you sound reasonably in tune on this simple test. Do the same thing with a recently-tuned piano.


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Note there are two different 20th-century designs of recorder, "German" and "baroque". You can tell the difference by looking at the relative size of the finger holes - see http://www.mollenhauer.com/en/useful-information/recorder-designs/baroque-and-german-fingering#.VcU2nZDbKJA. You can't play in tune using the "wrong" fingering for the instrument. The ...


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Tenuto is a notational device to make it easy to add selective legato within a phrase. The tenuto mark indicates that the note is to be sustained as long as possible before the next note is articulated, in whatever way is appropriate for that next note. Legato just means "do that same thing for every note for the entire length of this phrase". As an ...



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