Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

It is never too late. If you practice regularly and have a good teacher, in ten years you could be professional!


-1

14 is most definitely not too late. Note that one does not "get the hang of playing the violin" without lessons. At any age. The instrument offers a vast amount of possibilities to be doing things wrong, and avoiding and/or recognizing those is not something you can reasonably expect to work without the input of a teacher. Note also that "fond of ...


3

I'm not a string player (I once tried to learn viola da gamba but gave it up), however I've known a lot of early music string players. I was once told by a professional Baroque violist that in order to perform all the styles of music from the earliest days of the violin, viola and cello to the present day, if one wants to observe historical performance ...


1

In short: Bows varied a lot during the baroque period, and evolved into something pretty similar to a modern bow. The bow in the first picture may be heavier, shorter, and with a less pronounced curve than a typical modern bow, and would be made of a different, less dense type of wood. But the picture doesn't show enough to tell all the detail of this ...


1

For a complete beginner, it is normal for the strings to be uncomfortable to press down, especially the E string. Try minimizing your playing time at first, and build it up slowly. Take frequent breaks when your fingertips start hurting. If your strings are too high, it will hurt more, and for longer. Standard height for strings at the end of the ...


0

The two bows pictured are quite different. The first does not appear to be a 'curved' bow. The second is curved. Curved bows are rare. With the curved bow players can play all of the strings at the same time. With the standard bow one or two strings are played.


1

I am no luthier, so I'm not going to claim that whan I say is absolute truth. But I found this site after searching for a bit, and it seems quite correct to me. And yes, it is normal that the distance between the finger board and the strings grow larger the closer to the brigde you get, and it will thusly be harder on the fingers to play closer to the ...


1

There are C strings and there are C strings. I have set up small violins to be "violas" for children who were starting Suzuki viola at a very young age. Most C strings sounded the way you describe, but I was able to minimize this effect with a particular choice of string. It's been a while, so I'm not sure -- maybe it was a Dominant. Also make sure you ...


2

I believe the term you are looking for is "bariolage." It is often used to describe passages that alternate between two strings—one open and the other mostly stopped (often playing a melody that is meant to be heard apart from the open-string pedal or cover tone)—but can also be extended to passages involving more strings. There are some good examples at ...


2

The string length of a viola is not all that much more than that of a violin (if it were "in scale", it would need to be 50% more than that of a violin). Naturally, you don't want a rededicated G string, but with a "proper" C string, there will not be all that much of a string thickness variation to work with. The main problem is that a violin body is just ...


0

Others have already given tips on taking up your instrument again, so I'm not going to repeat anything. As for books, it really depends on whether you want to pick up violin again for fun or learn it seriously. In any case, I suggest you look at some scale and technique books to re-learn your basic skills, then look into song books.


0

While there are some very good answers here, I just want to add something else that might help. Play tunes you know very very well. Doesn't matter what it is, or how easy it is, just play a melody that you know inside and out. I'm talking nursery rhymes and folk songs here. Could even be a cheesy pop song's melody that you've known since you were a ...


1

I used to have tapes on my violin when I was learning to play, but when you put a finger on the tape you cannot see where exactly it touches the string and likely you are going to be slightly off and even 0.5mm off can be a great difference in the purity of the sound. The only way to play right is to develop the correct hearing. Listen to a few basic scales ...


0

You can also contact some of you local violin luthiers. They will have all the knowledge pertaining to the condition and source of your violin. Also even if many of them do sell instruments they are not as desperate in there need to sell you something that what is the case with a guitar centre type of music shop.


0

Since the part about pricing seems to have been answered, I'll concentrate on the what is a good violin part, first by distinguishing between types of violins. There are actually schools of violins; nationalities; not unlike the different schools of playing the violin. Amongst the most popular nationalities (which regroup general guidelines on how violins ...


0

You can play along with MIDI playback. MIDI is computer generated and have perfect rhythm and pitch. But you need to develop your ears also.


1

I would like someone to help with a run down of everything they do when they practice, step by step. Start by doing some relaxing exercises, without the instrument. I don't know how it's called, but I really like to let my upper body fall down, like I was trying to touch my feet with my hands. I guess anything really would be great, but remember to ...


0

I am only eleven years old but I have found that it is easier if you pinch the bow with your thumb and forefinger.


0

I realize in these economic times a teacher is sometimes prohibitive. However, utubes can only go so far, for both instruments. If faced with a choice, piano, only because the chance of causing irreversible damage to muscles, ligaments and tendons is less. Basically, playing a keyboard, the stressors are less, as both hands are doing basically the same ...


2

I'd recommend the piano because you'll inherently learn more about music theory and how notes work together, and that will benefit you in many ways. Keyboards provide a very clear, visual analogy of the notes they create and this facilitates understanding the more abstract ideas in music (it can distract from it, too, but it helps more than it harms). ...


-1

Violin involves both hands working together to produce notes. With piano you might have left hand playing bass clef, right hand playing treble clef, never mind your feet. Because of this I would consider violin easier, even if some the most basic things (playing a series of single notes) are harder. Is guitar out of the question? It's probably easier than ...


0

Strongly recommend guitar. Much cheaper than either of the other two. Violin has an initial learning curve of pure glass to get to making nice noises. It is virtually impossible to learn the technique you need without a teacher. It also requires you to have the hearing to tell whether you're exactly on the note or slightly off, and adjust for it. Not ...


0

Piano may be less frustrating to begin with, easier to learn technique-wise. But this is also an instrument that leads many self-taught (or bad-taught) musicians to rely on keys and "finger memory" instead of their ears. Hearing is what makes you a good musician. Violin forces you to train this fundamental aspect from the outset. It's also cheap and easy to ...


3

Learning to play the violin by yourself is very hard. If a teacher is out of the question, then I strongly recommend going for the piano (there a lot of youtube tutorials for piano self-learners, I've yet to see one for a violin).


0

Unless you have a physical handicap, you're not too old to learn. And with that I mean something like severe arthritis or having one or both hands amputated. Being completely deaf would also be a problem of course You can, but as others have said it's far from ideal. At the very least go for some video instruction course, ideally with an internet forum or ...


1

I played violin (and later viola) since childhood up through college. I never learned piano. You say you don't want to engage a teacher. That's fine, it won't stop you from being able to play. But if you want to become really good that will hurt you because you'll learn habits that will prevent your technique from becoming really good later and those habits ...


12

I will throw in my own take as I differ from the other opinions on a few points: Like everyone says: go for it. If you put in the time and attention to it, you will get rewarded. You mention "3 hours free time on weekdays and whole day on weekends for practice". I'd suggest that you start slow: practicing is tiring. Practice a tiny bit but regularly, ...


18

Is it too late for me to learn an instrument? No. It's never to old to learn anything. Having the determination and persistence to continue is the hard part. It might be harder for you to learn as your brain isn't as flexible as it was. Music is a language and it will take work to learn. Don't get discouraged though! Can I learn it by myself? ...


4

For question 1: It's never too late to learn anything. Age is never a barrier to learn anything. You are still 26 years old. How come you came to such a conclusion? And about your muscles and bones concerns, all I've got to say is you are not going to work out in a gym, weight lifting or body building. You are going to learn the best philosophy that can ...



Top 50 recent answers are included