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1

Well the source of the problem can be possible three kinds: a) your skill b) the violin/string (ruling out the bow as you already tried a different one) c) not enough rosin on the string (But I suppose we can rule it out) In order to test for a, have someone else try the same thing. In order to test for b try an entirely different violin. As for a potential ...


6

For me it is always my left hand accidentally touching the E string (at the base of the first or second fingers where they join the palm), my bow drifting away from the bridge, my bow angle drifting so that it is no longer parallel to the bridge, or the angle of my bow to the string i.e. my bow is sitting too upright so that the bow hairs are not splayed ...


4

It's likely part instrument, part string. The E string is not wound so it has less grip than the other strings anyway. This can be acerbated by the acoustics of the instrument: some instruments show this more than others. If the E string cuts into the bridge, this will generally also have this sort of effect. My violin maker fits a bit of drum skin (no ...


2

Outside of unisono passages where everybody plays the same (apart from the octave choice and possibly some fifth thrown in for tecture), violins and violas are almost never playing the same: it would be wasting the distinctive texture difference between those two instruments. For fast passages, violas do not really provide the same kind of response and/or ...


20

A standard string section of an orchestra will have: 1st Violins 2nd Violins Violas Cellos Basses One very typical way to think of this is by way of comparison to a four-part SATB choir (sopranos, altos, tenors, and basses). In this scheme, the first violins will have the melody line, like the soprano part of a choir. The cellos will have the bass line ...


0

Pick it up as soon as possible. I used to play and let it go for 40 years. I just started studying again - about 4 months ago. It's challenging to regain something that was put on hold so many years ago. I look forward to a recital in about 3 weeks but I just don't have it the way I did when I was 20.


1

There are about two methods I have used to tune my violin without solely relying on my ears: 1) Using a Tuner that tells me whether my string is too sharp or flat and I can loosen/tighten the string accordingly. 2) Using an online tuner app that emits the exact pitch of each string (E,A,G,D) and by listening to it I can keep tuning my strings until they ...


1

Yes, it should be. If you want to be sure, you could test them with a tone generator on your computer (eg. see if the generated tone is properly identified by your tuner).


0

Pick it up, dust it off, and start all over again! It's probably been 5 or 6 years, so some will have been lost for now, but it often comes back quite quickly. If you only played solo - as is usual for grades stuff, it would be a good move to join an amateur orchestra/ensemble when you have your skills back, after a few months or less. Your musical tastes ...


1

Personally, I'd take it up again for a few months until you have most of what you did at one time resurface (it would come back up anyway even if you started with lessons right away). And once it stabilizes somewhat ("stabilizes", not "stagnates": the idea is not to go as far as you can on your own but to get the stuff that is still in your bones back into ...



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