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When something of this sort happens to me I use a metronome and start slow (4/4 at 100 bpm) and slowly build up. I'd suggest playing the instrument like a workout on alternate days and you should be able to build back the strength. Also I would recommend playing in-front of a mirror as this could also be caused by wrong posture, which can be easily corrected ...


1

For the violin it is a combination of both muscle memory and micro-adjustments. The violinist is always adjusting as she plays. To the great virtuoso Jascha Heifetz is attributed the following quote: "I play as many wrong notes as anyone, but I fix them before most people can hear them."


5

Like the comments said, it's a combination of both. As a trombone player, we have the muscle memory to hit notes at what should be in tune, but what is in tune may also vary. You tune the notes based on what is in tune in context (surrounding ensemble/accompanist), the tuning will not always be A = 440, so you need to have the ability to hear tuning and ...


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You should really base your choice of what to learn based on which one you most like rather than which one is easiest. In truth, no instrument is easier than any other when played at the highest level of musicianship, just some instruments are easier to get started on than others. Violin and guitar are fully chromatic instruments meaning that every note is ...


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All of the below assumes whatever you do will involve daily practice (at least half an hour but an hour is better) and study (of resources on how to play). You don't need a teacher to learn harmonica but if guitar is your first instrument then a teacher is highly recommended, and for violin almost everyone needs a good teacher to succeed. A diatonic ...


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You notice more on a guitar that when you pluck the string the pitch will slowly decline as it fades.Not enough for you to notice if you had not been told . A violin bow will keep the pitch steady as the bow activates the string .


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You want A=440hz if playing modern (post baroque) music; usually A=435 hz if playing baroque or earlier in or close to its original period intonations. Whether to use the 2/3 relationship also depends upon which intonation system is being used and which key. Pythagorean tuning at 2:3 resonance is "equal temperment" - which should NOT be used if doing ...


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It's a combination of spiccato bowing (bouncing the bow off the strings) alternating with left-hand pizzicato. Of course the real Paganini did this sort of party trick having slashed three of the violin strings with a knife, and then holding the violin upside down, if some of the stories about him are to be believed. ...


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Looks to me like the player is interspersing conventionally bowed notes with left-hand pizzicato notes. This is similar to the pull-off (ligado) technique on guitar, but has a quite different sound. I only watched the clip once, but it appears that the passages that combine bowed and L.H. pizzicato are executed as follows: a note is fingered with the little ...


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PrincessMarth, if you are unsure or if you already see your yourself as a diversified musician, perhaps not as profficient at any single instrument but able to fulfill different roles in a band or your personal project, or become mainly a composer, then go with Tekkerue's advice and try both, at least for while until you're more familiar with both ...


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I see no reason why you can't play both if you are interested in both. I started playing drums and guitar at the same time at age 15 and now 19 years later I still play both and I have also dabbled in other instruments (like piano) but I consider drums to be my main instrument. Learning piano is widely applicable to other instruments and the visual layout ...


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#2 is a minor triad in first inversion (it has the 3rd as the lowest note). #3 is a major triad in second inversion (the 5th is lowest). Doing them in this order forms a simple chord progression: I vi IV viiĀ°/V V.



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