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2

The angle the tailpiece takes depends on several factors- the shape of the bridge as you mentioned, the various tensions of the strings, the height and number of fine tuners, etc. The only way to change the angle without changing the bridge or the strings is with the fine tuners: most violins are designed for having just one, so the tailpiece rides lower ...


0

It I were to practice a fast piece, Patience is key. I would first start with a metronome at a slow speed. Try to figure out all the best fingering patterns and gradually increase your speed when you feel more confident. Don't rush it. Second, you could try some finger exercises like etudes and studies. Practicing scales would help too. If there is a ...


2

Please tell me you didn't end up repurposing the instrument! I'm sad nobody on the thread previously mentioned buying a true violin C string. They do exist. I own a wonderful 5 string violin and have a Thomastik vision violin C. Not the cheapest, but sounds gorgeous! Daddario also makes Helicore violin C strings, which are used widely and less expensive. You ...


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Title Why do I always sound better when I play violin with my teacher? One skill in violin playing is pitch. There are no frets on the violin's fingerboard: we choose the pitch of the note. So for us violinists intonation (pitching) is a skill. Many say that good intonation comes from inside the violinist, which is true, but it really helps to have a ...


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I'm not aware that this is a common problem. As a young student, I always sounded best in my own practice room and much less well during lessons. I can think of two main reasons why it might be so in your case. You may trust your teacher and your natural musicality may induce you to imitate what you hear without knowing just what it is that you do. ...


1

This is going to depend on the skill of the player, the genre, and the taste of the listener. If the player is skilled enough, just about any combination will sound good. That said, an amplified acoustic is more prone to feedback than a quality electric, making it less suitable for genres like rock. Classical, however, has such a strong tradition of ...


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Jazz players do it all the time. Extemporisation, playing the changes,improvising are words for it. Listz used to do it all the time on piano, Bach et al used it so it's not new. To make a start, try using the major pentatonic scale notes in the key of that section. If it's minor, then use the minor pent. notes. All this does is remove a couple of notes ...


3

Part of the reason might be that you have a poor quality violin. There should be a resonant frequency of the air inside the violin body that is close to the frequency of the open D string, but if it is too close you will get the effect you described, especially if the body of the violin is not very resonant or the body resonant frequency is too high. See ...


1

As I've said in the comments, open strings are generally a little louder than they would be if they had fingers on them. The fact that you say your G string is actually quite than the D string makes me wonder if the strings are the same brand. Another thing to take into account is string gauge, or how thick or thin they are. Usually, people go with ...


1

Whatever you do, leave as many strings on the instrument as possible. Taking too many off can cause your post to collapse, and then you have to pay to have someone reach in there and give a post adjustment. That really stinks. I think it should be ok as long as you are careful not to joggle it too much and are quick in getting the next string. As to why ...


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Don't forget that you can mix and match different brands on the same instrument - often people go for a high-end E and/or A and then have a less expensive D and G. A couple of Danish options (they seem to be good at making strings, along with pastries and bacon): Jargar are great steel core strings, durable and decent tone. They last quite a long time ...


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In this case, you would play the first two bottom notes (E and G), then shift your bow to play the top two notes (G and D), since it is very difficult to play on three strings at once.


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These are called triple stops. There are also double stops and, I think they're called, quadruple stops. Double stops can be easily played by keeping your bow level between the two strings so that it touches both. Harder to play are triple and quad stops. These are usually played with a rolled bow quickly. Usually for these, you try to keep them bow ...


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Depends on the era. Baroque violins had a less curved bridge and less string tension. This made it easier to play three notes simultaneously without sounding out of line. The given chord is sort-of unusual but can be fingered in second position as 4-2-1 on G-D-A strings. Now here is where it gets strange: this is labeled "easy can-can" and a chord in ...


5

It is not easily seen in this video, she uses an up bow playing the 4 notes as two double-stops in succession. Hahn - Mozart - Violin Concerto No.3 starting at about 1:18. The first one is a G the second chord is an A I believe. Here is another one on youtube What Is a Chord? | Violin Lessons . So I would play the bottom two as a double-stop and then ...


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It's very common to write 3 or 4 note chords for strings, and the implication is to play it as two gestures in quick succession. Here is the first page of the first movement of Beethoven's first symphony: On the fourth bar, there's a 4-note chord (mercifully, with two open strings). The standard way to play this is to quickly play a double stop on the ...


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You're right, you can't play three notes at once on the violin with a normal bow and pressure. What's almost certainly meant here is an arpeggio, playing the three notes quickly one after the other. This is often notated sloppily as a chord which is not really possible to play- even Bach did this in his violin sonatas, leaving generations of violinists ...


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They could have meant 'tone' or 'musicality'. So, as you say in your comment, you can be 'technically perfect', hitting all the right notes at the right time, but perhaps not 'feeling' the music. Also like you say in your question, listening to great recordings is a good way of hearing good musicality and tone! However whether you like someone's specific ...


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Several things that could be happening. As has been mentioned several times above, you may have a surplus of rosin on your bow/strings. Try taking a very soft hanky and gently moving it over the hair of the bow a few times. This removes any extra rosin. Where on the bow do you play? Play closer to the frog can cause the bow to be sticky n' stuff. Play in ...



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