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The violin is one of the least anatomically sane instruments. Left to your own devices, you'll end up cramping it into position, and cramping your handling into something with as few variables as you think you can manage. Once you've locked yourself into this kind of corner, it will take a lot of work getting out of there again. And violin is not a ...


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Two major things I'll mention which I consciously practice while learning a fast passage: Keep your fingers down! It's very easy to develop the bad habit of flapping your fingers around like mad as you race over the notes. You should aim to be hovering all fingers barely above the string and absolutely minimize the amount of finger movement required to ...


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There is a widely regarded book for pianists http://www.pianopractice.org/book.pdf I guess much of it will not directly apply to other instruments like violin However some of it is generic ie will apply to all kinds of practice eg see pg 127 fast and slow muscles


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If your tailpiece is loose my advice is: go to a luthier. Because in this case is important to check if the sound-pole is in its place, as it can move away or fall and endanger the violin. Since you have to do that ask there for a cleaning product. Violins have a special polish that is most often made/produced by the luthier himself. On your own I would ...


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It depends on whether you ever want to use it as a violin again or whether it is supposed to be a decoration piece. Early 1900 copies of good instruments may well be mass-manufactured (Markneukirchen and other German cities near the Czech border were notable for cranking out mislabeled or at least misleadingly labeled "old master" instruments in drones). ...


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As everyone else has already answered the answer is ... practice. Here are three practice techniques and a performance technique that I've found useful. Metronome Find the metronome beat at which you can play the passage comfortably. Play it through a few times at this comfortable speed and then notch the metronome up. Keep mastering the passage at each new ...


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Of course, the answer is to practice. But simply playing the same thing over and over again at different speeds won't necessarily be effective. Try playing variations of the difficult runs. In particular, try it with different rhythms. (For example, change a run of 16th notes into dotted rhythms — LONG-short, LONG-short, etc. Then reverse it as short-LONG, ...


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Uh, practice. Learn your lines by heart. Sight reading is nice and useful, but it's a secondary skill. At high speed, it consumes a lot of your focus. And frequently practice at half speed or slower, nicely detaching and properly phrasing your notes. At a speed where you can listen to what you are doing and not have your focus consumed by just blasting ...


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What you really need to become faster is simply: Practice A virtuoso will have practiced for tens of thousands of hours, practicing their accuracy, finger speed, odd intervals, runs, trills and arpeggios. There is no short cut. Just practice. I would suggest buying a metronome, as it will really help you improve speed and accuracy over time, so you can ...


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In an instrument score, putting notes on one stem usually indicates double stops. However, the way your score cuts off at the bottom, it looks like a partitura. While partiture are less condensed than a piano extract, they still have a certain tendency to compact homophonic passages. If you take a look at the distribution of the material, it is sometimes ...


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If the notes are clearly playable by a single player throughout the passage, and wouldn't restrict the flow (i.e. it “fits” the music), it's probably supposed to be non divisi unless otherwise indicated. Technically, divisi should be marked explicitly. However, orchestra members will often decide to divide the parts anyway, since it can make for cleaner ...


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It is a double stop! It would say div. on top if it were meant to be played by two violinists. You can always decide to split it though if it is too hard or if you like how it sounds better that way.


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Interestingly enough (or not :-) ), I ran across several variations in notation within the pieces a local orchestra is working on at present. One piece includes a square bracket , "[" in front of the phrase to indicate double stops. Another piece assumes no marks means "double stop," and specifically writes "divisi" where desired. It can depend on the ...


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It's... tricky. With no other indication, this probably means to play double stops. They're all pretty easy to play and there's no marking to the contrary. To indicate divisi, the composer should either mark "div.", or would split the stems, so that the top note stems point up and the bottom note stems point down. That being said, there are exceptions ...



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