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16

If what you want is to improve your vocal range, I would recommend these exercises: Warm up. Always warm up for a while before starting the actual exercise, doing easy vocalise in the middle of your vocal range. Scales, Thirds and Fourths. All types of scales that go through your entire vocal range. Practice them as often as you can. This will gradually ...


11

Simple advice is to take singing lessons. We here cannot know what you're doing and what you're doing wrong just by reading. You have to have a professional coaching you how to use your body in another way than you do now.


10

In choral settings it is a little more relaxed about what ranges are needed and what words are used to describe the singers in them. Usually singers in choirs don't have such a need for a very soloistic or virtuosic approach to singers and thus have a slightly smaller range. In opera it is pretty much demanded that you have close to a two octave range or ...


9

What you want to do is 1. Figure out the required range of the melody (such as for example a sixth, an octave, or an octave and a fifth). That means finding the lowest note and the highest note used for the melody (and determine the interval between those). 2. Fit the middle of that melody range1 best possible to the middle of the average musically useful2 ...


8

Well, I can't say for certain how a choir would react to this without seeing the actual arrangement, but: Db6 for a soprano will not work at all. You can't expect choir sopranos to go above A5. There are very few women in the world who can sing Db6, and they are opera divas. No one could possibly use that in a choral setting. S2 only gets to sing three ...


8

The average singer who goes from practicing or exercising many times per week down to once a week or less will see a marked decrease in their range. Humans have a natural vocal range, or tessitura. The average is about an octave, though many can sing a span of an octave and a half or even a two-octave span (three-octave range) even "cold". Outside that ...


7

As a friend of mine once explained, "It's like paint. If you mix together several colors of paint to make a custom color of paint, you can't un-mix it and get the original separate colors of paint back." Vocal removal software, as mentioned in other answers here, is only of limited usefulness due to laws of physics that cannot be circumvented. All such ...


7

In short, no or at least not permanently. Singing is more about learning how to relax the vocal chords and use all of your air. Basically, once you have that technique down it won't ever be taken from you (in my opinion). I believe it's like riding a bike; if you haven't ridden a bike for a while, you might suck at first. However, with seemingly minimal ...


7

If your looking for a quick fix, the only reliable one is to transpose the songs you want to sing. Even in areas with trained singers such as opera and broadway, the songs were written in keys comfortable for their first performers. Even today, some revivals of broadway shows may adjust particularly rangey songs up or down a small amount. As for anything in ...


7

I think that the discussion of tessitura is often lost in discussing ranges. If a part is well written, it will be comfortable for a singer of a given voice type to sing. Beethoven's Ninth and the Missa solemnis are thrilling works for the audience, but are murder on the singers, because they have to work so long in ranges of their voice that are ...


7

This is a very interesting question! I would never expect an expert to try to guess someone's vocal range simply based on their ethnic heritage, but it's true that some trends do persist just like any other physical characteristic does along cultural-biological lines. For example, the term "Russian bass" has been used to refer to Eastern-European basses with ...


6

The following are average ranges for your typical amateur church choir music, based on my 20-odd years' experience in choral singing: Soprano: Bb3-E5, with optional notes up to B5 (and you very rarely see much above G5) Alto: G3-C5, primarily staying between C4 and B4 (songs requiring altos to sing higher than C5 generally do so for a specific effect, or ...


6

As Thomas Bryla said in another answer, there's really no substitute for working with someone who can hear what you're doing and observe your posture while you're doing it. But here are some things I have learned from years of casual choral singing as a low female voice trying to do better (I usually sing tenor): Breath support makes a big difference. If ...


6

Always warm up in the middle of your range and gradually approach the limits of your range with upward and downward moving repetition of motifs. e.g. C3 D3 E3 D3 C3--- | D3 E3 F3 E3 D3--- | E3 F3 G3 F3 E3--- | and so on... Even a single warm up with ascending and descending exercises will temporarily increase your range for a time. Exercises that cross ...


6

One technique I know helps is to lift our head just a bit and try to relax as you go down. This will open up your airways to the maximum and also leave more room for your vocal cords to vibrate freely (the lower frequencies requires larger movements of the vocal cords). Just be care to not raise your head too much; If you raise your head too much, the vocal ...


5

I basically asked this question on the Audio site: How can I cut out a particular instrument in the same pitch range as other instruments I don't want to cut? As you can see there, the answer is no. There's no good way for software to tell what is voice and what is not for any arbitrary voice and song combined into a single waveform. As you note it can be ...


5

In consideration of your question, I came across extensive blogs on vocal pedagogy by Ian Howell, a professional countertenor and educator in Boston. Since I'm not familiar with his work, I cannot tell you whether his writings are authoritative or not, but he has written extensively on the physiology of the countertenor voice and what is being done with the ...


5

I'd say Luke's (and user10944's) answer of an octave sounds about right for vocal parts. While typical SATB vocal ranges for your standard 4-part harmony are usually listed as about an octave and a half each, many simple melodies stay within about an octave. Depending on the melodic contour, that octave may stretch from dominant to dominant (as in Amazing ...


4

Overall vocal type (e.g. soprano vs contralto or tenor vs bass) seems to be what you were born with and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voice_type#Classifying_singers warns of the dangers of misclassification of vocal type, and by implication, attempting to sing at the extremes of one's natural range. Practice is certainly required to reach the expected range ...


4

If you sing regularly (like in a choir, or getting lessons), you'll get a good idea from the warmup exercises you do there. So I gather that this is not your situation. Your range is probably wider than the range of a typical song that you'll sing, so what you really want to find is the most natural, comfortable part of your range. One way to do that is ...


4

In my experience of leading amateur kids choirs, the comfortable range for most 4-8 year olds would be around middle C (or possibly as low as the B flat just below that) up to around D or E -- that is, just over an octave. Many kids would struggle with a low A or a high F, I think.


4

First off, we need to distinguish between range and tessitura. Your range is the complete set of notes that you can sing, including head tone and falsetto. Your tessitura is the range in which it is most comfortable for you to sing. Both of these change over time, and particularly for male voices, those changes can persist well into a singer's thirties. As a ...


3

The answer to this is very simple: 1.) Go to a piano / keyboard / guitar 2.) Start at middle "C" (3rd fret A-string on guitar.) 3.) Move down 1 note / fret at a time until you can't comfortably sing with dynamics (you should be able to make sounds past this point.) 4.) Go back to middle "C" 5.) Move up 1 note / fret at a time until you can't ...


3

Without a doubt, you should pay for a couple of lessons with a qualified voice teacher. They'll help you identify your range and point out that with proper training, you'll be able to expand your range both upward and downward. If you are a man, you should also learn how to take notice of the difference between your "head" voice, your "chest" voice, and ...


3

You can definitely enhance your range a little with tuition. However, professional singers, like the rest of us, sing with what nature gave them. That's why there are some men who have the most wonderful rich, pure voices very low down. Singing high is just not important compared to singing well without strain, and a teacher can help you do both. You can ...


3

While this is an interesting question that you have asked, to the best of my knowledge there are no such factors at all. It is entirely a matter of the genetically-predetermined physiology of the vocal tract in an adult. Some men are born to be tenors, some baritones, some basses (relatively few). Some women are born to be coloratura sopranos (very few), ...


3

This is absolutely normal, and nothing to worry about—you're just discovering your break. Although the pitch location varies from person to person, everyone has a point at which they have to shift from one vocal production style to another. Different terms are used, and you should go with what your teacher uses, but this is often called the shift ...


3

One cannot really tell where a voice type is heading, and it very much depends on what you end up being long-term comfortable with. To give you an idea about different voice types, I just made a recording showing the difference between chest voice, head voice, and falsetto over the same range. It's not all that surprising that using chest voice and ...


2

The ranges you can use depend on who is singing, of course. If you know the choir for whom you are writing your work, use their ranges to the best of your ability. In many cases, though, you are writing more for a particular type of choir: Writing for a typical church choir? Use conservative ranges, like the ones in @WheatWilliams' answer. (Note that ...


2

Every choir I've ever been in has done the 1-2-3-4-5-4-2-1 warmup (sing on open vowels, go up half a step, iterate), but I found that I got some help on the low end when a director added descending runs to the lineup: 5-4-3-2-1, then down a half-step and repeat. You'll produce sound in warmups below where you can sing, just as ascending runs get you above ...



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