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13

There are two terms for this technique: overdubbing and multi-track recording. These techniques are not new, and they are used on practically all music recordings everywhere all the time. These techniques are not only used for vocals; they are used for all musical instruments, and for sound effects in video and films as well. It is safe to say that ...


10

Strictly speaking, it is not necessary to learn an instrument to become a singer/vocalist. It doesn't help increase vocal range or intonation. Even music theory is not necessary. Music theory helps the singer communicate with other musicians (what key to pick, how many semitones to transpose, etc...) but it won't make him a better performer. However, ...


9

What you want to do is 1. Figure out the required range of the melody (such as for example a sixth, an octave, or an octave and a fifth). That means finding the lowest note and the highest note used for the melody (and determine the interval between those). 2. Fit the middle of that melody range1 best possible to the middle of the average musically useful2 ...


8

Well, yes, when listening to pop and rock music, it can seem like much of the vocal harmonisation moves in parallel motion (often in thirds and sixths), but there are plenty of examples of different motion out there, if you listen out for them. I've always thought that The Beatles used some subtly interesting vocal harmonies. Below are the first 8 bars of ...


7

Vocoders were originally invented as a way to transmit speech over low-capacity transmission media. To encode: Start with speech as an electronic signal (e.g. from a microphone) Put the signal through a multi-band filter, getting some number of new signals, each covering a different frequency range. Pass each of these frequency bands through an envelope ...


6

Vocal style I think the confusion here is that there are many different kinds of vibrato, with playing techniques that differ from instrument to instrument and a style and nature that relates both to the instrument and the style of music you are playing. In general, the "classical voice" has a wide unconstrained vibrato, while the "jazz/pop" voice has a ...


6

Grab a fake book and start digesting them! "Fake books" were historically completely illegal compilations of lead sheets (containing chord changes and melody lines) used by musicians as a quick reference for any one of the hundreds of charts they'd never seen before. These were completely illegal because no one was paying to license these songs from the ...


6

If you've got a microphone, you shouldn't be getting volume from your vocal chords - if you want louder, turn up the amplifier. Consider that the electric guitarist who's drowning you out is making an incredibly quiet sound, until his amp gets hold of it. If your amplifier doesn't go loud enough, then either you need a more powerful PA, or everyone else ...


5

For goodness' sake, get thee to a voice instructor! Rock/blues stars who appear to be screaming and shredding their vocal cords have taken many lessons in how to produce that sound structure without actually stressing their throat. (or their career is less than a couple years long :-( ).


5

I think you will be hard-pressed to find someone willing to endorse screaming as a viable means of sustainable vocal production. Screaming is hurtful to the vocal folds. The reason why your voice gives out is because your vocal folds are inflamed from the screaming and cannot continue to resonate properly enough to sustain vocal production. This is why ...


5

"Tone deaf" is a bit of a misnomer -- if someone truly wasn't able to understand relative pitch, it would show up in their speech patterns. So, usually the term is applied to people for whom discerning differences in pitch is difficult, at least with the precision that is required for music. The fact that you must multitask this process with the act of ...


5

The same challenge can be found with musicians learning keyboards as they have to learn how to coordinate both left and right hands playing together. To accomplish this, students are given pieces that progress from easy to hard and they advance as they are ready. The key here is to break down each part to beats whether you are singing one part and playing ...


4

The tuner in Logic is designed for tuning instruments, so it takes a moving average. The properties you need for monitoring your singing - a fast response, and accuracy when you're quickly changing pitch, simply weren't design goals for that tool. For the same reasons, a typical tuner from a music shop, probably won't achieve what you want. A basic guitar ...


4

Well, knowing every guitar player does it a little different, here's how I myself have set up my pedal-board, and how I know quite a lot of players do it (more or less) Tuner - well, it doesnt (or shouldn't) affect the sound, and you don't want anything before it. Have never seen it somewhere else than at the start Compressor - used to 'even' the sound and ...


4

It used to be done, from the fifties, with double tracking, where the vocalist would re-record the melody and it would be dubbed over the original vocal track. Since it would not be exact, it sounded as you describe. Quite possibly now, it's done with a slight digital delay and maybe a cent or two of re-tuning.


4

Where it's used is irrelevant. No genre demands a particular type of voice, a particular sound, etc. Well, opera demands some special usage of some muscles, but other than that you find all sorts of characters dipping into all kinds of genres. That being said, it is true that a lot of rock artists have higher tenor voices, but that doesn't mean bassier ...


3

Loopy is an excellent app which does this. Loopy goes several steps further than a typical loop pedal. It allows for 6, 9 or 12 layered loops. They can be synchronised. You can create half, double, quadruple etc. length loops -- so for example, a one bar rhythm loop under a 12 bar melody loop. You can merge loops on the fly You can operate it using MIDI ...


3

Things you definitely need : P.A. system - which should incorporate the mixer, eq. and probably reverb. Drum machine. Synthesiser/ keyboard. Mic. Looper with maybe 4 or 5 pedals, to produce differing mixes. This gives the things you maybe don't need : Compressors. Exciters. Pitch shifter, etc. With a decent looper, you can create your own loops and save ...


3

One technique I was taught to facilitate limb independence on the drumkit may help you here as well: play only the instrumental part and try conversing with someone. Have them ask you simple questions infrequently at first and try to answer without disturbing the rhythm in your playing, and progress once you're comfortable with that to more complicated ...


3

I think this is a matter of vocabulary. Volume is quietness or loudness. Pitch is the frequency of the note. On a piano keyboard: pitch is which key you hit volume is how hard you hit the key "Is it possible to sing the same frequency, say the middle C, at different volumes?" Yes! You can sing any note quietly or loudly. Put some backing music on. ...


3

It's called double-tracking vocals. The singer can record the same part more than once, and those parts are mixed together later. It can also be achieved artificially, separating one unique take into two or more tracks, and treating each track with different processes like pitch shifting, pitch modulation, delay, EQ, etc. This is a very in-depth article ...


3

I would indeed discuss it with her teacher. If the teacher doesn't appear to seem entirely confident in her answer, I would consult with other teachers as well. I would not add more lessons; they are likely to do more harm than good. Also, while she might "grow out of" the problem, she is likely to resolve it more quickly with help and guidance. That ...


3

First, let's make a distinction: When you say "bassy", are you talking about the tone of your voice, or the pitch range of your voice? Your pitch range, or voice type (bass, baritone, tenor) is not something you can change, but you can learn to expand your range. If by "bassy" you mean the tone you produce rather than the pitch range, then voice lessons ...


3

One cannot really tell where a voice type is heading, and it very much depends on what you end up being long-term comfortable with. To give you an idea about different voice types, I just made a recording showing the difference between chest voice, head voice, and falsetto over the same range. It's not all that surprising that using chest voice and ...


3

You're very unlikely to find any sort of polyphonic tonal music that has zero parallel motion. The rules of counterpoint proscribe the use of parallel 5ths and octaves, but not any other intervals (4ths are somewhat frowned upon), so avoiding parallel motion entirely wouldn't be an intent on the part of a composer. The reason that 5ths and 8ths are ...


2

We may not be referring to the same genres of music... Most screamers, growlers, (talking most modern metal) etc whom I've met that do this for a set or more frequently are singing at a much lower level surprisingly than one would imagine. A loud system backing up your vocals plus some EQ, maybe a bit of smooth distortion on the mic and you've got a gnarly ...


2

As mentionned in the other answers, ear training is in a category of its own. I would advise you to start with humming major scales and using an ear training course or software. Usually the first exercise consist of discerning the lower note between two, which is exactly what you need. Then you'll be able to move a step up and try to recognise intervals, ...


2

This area of musical study is called ear training. We have a tag on that subject; I have just added that tag to your question. There are several posts on that subject here on Musical Practice and Performance. Here is one. A music teacher can teach you ear-training (although this is usually done in classrooms rather than one-on-one) and there are a lot of ...


2

There's a 3rd property of your voice - timbre. volume is the overall loudness, pitch is the overall frequency. But timbre is the "characteristic sound" of once cycle of the frequency. In order to get your voice louder, your throat, voicebox, mouth and nasal passages change size. This gets your voice louder for the same pitch, but it will also change the ...


2

There is a curious relationship between pitch (frequency of the sound-wave), volume (amplitude of the sound-wave), and perceived intensity. Higher pitches at the same volume as lower pitches will sound louder. This is why a Bass amplifier needs 400-800 watts to match a 100 watt Guitar amplifier.



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