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17

Head voice, chest voice, throat voice, as well as their "register" version and falsetto are old and confusing names to describe an almost universal phenomena: When singing from the lowest to the highest pitch than you can sing, the hollow parts of our body (chest, larynx, mouth, upper cranium) share and sustain differently the resonance of the sounds ...


17

The only difference between singing and humming is really where the air is going. Since you're directing the air through your mouth to form a whistle, this can't be humming, you're actually singing and whistling at the same time. When I taught myself how to do this, I did notice that the two pitches were moving together at first, but I'll bet if you worked ...


16

Drinking cold water long-term won't make your voice "lousier". The whole idea behind singing is to have your vocal cords and surrounding muscles as loose as possible while singing. Hydration is a huge part of healthy vocal cords, so drink as much water as you can (hot, cold, or otherwise). It's just recommended that if you get thirsty either just before or ...


15

If what you want is to improve your vocal range, I would recommend these exercises: Warm up. Always warm up for a while before starting the actual exercise, doing easy vocalise in the middle of your vocal range. Scales, Thirds and Fourths. All types of scales that go through your entire vocal range. Practice them as often as you can. This will gradually ...


15

I often start my warming up like this: Take a deep breath and sigh/hum softly and gently. Repeat this a few times. Repeat the exercise with the mouth opened, but not with more effort, for a few times After a while, you should have found your "ground tone", which is the tone you can sing without straining. This tone is the basis of healthy singing. Take a ...


14

I would not be surprised to hear that singers are more commonly corrected in that direction, but it's certainly not impossible to be "a little sharp." A few reasons this might be perceived: There is generally a correlation between tension and higher pitch, be it tension in the diaphragm or larynx or whatever; when people sing higher in pitch, they ...


13

If you can hear yourself being out of tune, chances are you can teach yourself to fix it... or work with a vocal coach who is experienced enough in communicating HOW to change your technique... I've worked miracles with students who thought they couldn't sing in the past, and the results are wonderful for both teacher and student. On the other hand, if you ...


13

There's an excellent book by Gerald Klickstein called The Musician's Way that is the best treatment of this topic I've come across. Klickstein is a guitarist as well, but the methodology he advocates is applicable to any instrumentalist Keep a practice log Split your practice time among these broad categories: New material Developing material ...


12

One cause of yawning can certainly be that your body needs more oxygen, so key to solving the problem is getting enough breaths in. Some scores have breaths marked, but for others you'll need to work out for yourself where you can fit your breaths in. You can train for bigger breaths but some people find it difficult to breathe properly. I know a couple of ...


12

Both, but talent and practice tend to refer to very nearly the same thing (It's hard to separate innate musical ability from ability conditioned from dedicated practice). Let's clarify your question as "Genetics or practice". Practice will take you into the realm of professional singing. It's not enough to get you big solos, but it is enough to get ...


12

Every singer who has ever gotten voice lessons deals with this. Do not be upset if it takes considerable time and practice for you to learn how to sing the high notes freely and easily. If you keep practicing regularly and carefully, you will get better at it over time. There are certain techniques you can practice to make the high notes sound better, but ...


11

First off, relevant to your question, a tight throat is a sore throat. The number one most common mistake novice singers make is controlling their breath (and thus volume and phrasing) by constricting their throat. First, this clamps down on several key areas of resonance, reducing projection and increasing the nasal quality of your voice (which most people ...


11

Tags are idiomatic to barbershop music (which is typically four a cappella voices), and refer to the ending chords of a song, usually coincident with the last line of lyrics. Sometimes singers will get together for the sole purpose of singing tags, since they are easier to learn than an entire piece of music and usually consist of harmonic cadences that are ...


11

In this context, "Naturstimme" means "untrained voice". It's neither a compliment nor a detraction. I believe that he is pointing out that you do not sound like a classically-trained singer who learns to sing in the operatic manner. Whether he would prefer a "Naturstimme" or a "Kunstgesangstimme" (an "art-song-trained" voice) for his choir is another ...


11

Sounds to me like he's pushing his voice a lot harder to get over the band volume. In an acoustic situation, he's singing in a more relaxed way, but put all the instruments in, at a volume which is probably unnecessary anyway, and the sing becomes more of a shout. By turning up his mic a balance will partially be restored, (but his ears will still tell him ...


10

Here are three exercises I use with students: Lip-buzzing through a phrase of a song (i.e. one long lipbuzz - as you need to engage your support to lip-buzz). If you can't lip-buzz, then rolling an 'r' also have the same effect. Slow breath in for three beats, then make a sizzling sound out for 10 beats (and then gradually extend this during practice to ...


10

Probably, you would look for the same things you would seek in any private music instructor. No teacher is right for every student. Here are a few things I would suggest: Ask around. Do you know anyone who has been a voice student? Is there any particular instructor that this student recommends? When you do have one or more instructors in mind, find ...


10

There are several things you can do to warm up your vocal cords properly. Sing half-scales using vowel sounds ("oo","oh","ee","ah","eh") Sing half-scales using vowel sounds + h (great for rough vocal days) ("hoo","hoh","hee,"hah,"heh") Sing half-scales using vowel sounds + m ("moo","moh","mee","mah","meh") Hum scales and half-scales. Do neck rolls (these ...


10

In choral settings it is a little more relaxed about what ranges are needed and what words are used to describe the singers in them. Usually singers in choirs don't have such a need for a very soloistic or virtuosic approach to singers and thus have a slightly smaller range. In opera it is pretty much demanded that you have close to a two octave range or ...


10

I would say yes, and yes. You've explained the problem pretty clearly, and explained its consequence. Choirs frequently find that they sing everything internally, consistently in-tune throughout a piece, but then at the end of the piece, they discover that they are no longer in tune with the reference pitches upon which they started the piece. The frame of ...


9

I'll answer the "When should I" of your question simply, and from the experience of someone with a music ed degree, but no formal voice training. I do know the basics of vocal training and education, and have had a little myself. I won't delve into the different physiological differences with the falsetto voice, since that's been awhile… :) For most male ...


9

I'm no expert on this, I'm only speaking from my own experiences singing in choir. d One of our conductors did this to help our voices blend better. He would ask individuals from a section to sing their part, and he would choose the one he thought had the most suitable sound/tone for the song. Then he would bring the other section members one by have them ...


9

First off, let's start with the definitions of the terms. False Bass (or "Fauxbourdon") is a French term relating to the harmonization of plainchant melodies in which the bass would be a 6th below the melody; thus creating a serious of first-inversion chords as the organum would typically be harmonized a perfect-fourth below the melody. I believe you ...


8

It is often not sweet drinks, per se, but what's in the most popular sweet drinks. So for example, soda (I assume the UK equivalent would be a 'soft drink' like Coca Cola?) often contains caffeine, which has a dehydrating effect and therefore affects the voice. This was borne out by a study in 1999 'Effect of caffeine on the vocal folds: a pilot study'* ...


8

Visualizing harmonies takes place in what I and others call the aural image; basically, being able to hear music internally with little or no outside stimulus. When instrumentalists practice this, they usually do it by singing, since the voice is that much more closely related to the brain than any given instrument. For all of the above, though, it can be ...


8

I recommend to practice listening. Take a piece of music with a polyphonic structure or many instruments and the notes and try to listen to a particular instrument. Start with simple pieces, for example a choral piece where you already know the bass quite well and you can switch between listening to the soprano and the bass or a piece with voice ...


8

Wikipedia says: The issue of the female falsetto voice has been met with some controversy, especially among vocal pedagogists. Many books on the art of singing completely ignore this issue, simply gloss over it, or insist that women do not have falsetto. This controversy, however, does not exist within the speech pathology community and arguments ...


8

As @luserdroog said in the comments, it would be best if you could get at least a couple lessons. Otherwise you risk learning bad habits with the physical aspects (that can't be taught well except in person) that you'll have to un-learn later. Another approach is to join a community choir. While some choirs require auditions, others do not (particularly ...


8

What you want to do is 1. Figure out the required range of the melody (such as for example a sixth, an octave, or an octave and a fifth). That means finding the lowest note and the highest note used for the melody (and determine the interval between those). 2. Fit the middle of that melody range1 best possible to the middle of the average musically useful2 ...


8

The song "Wonderful Dream" was written by Melanie Thornton (1967-2001). She was an American singer who had commercial success in Europe while remaining unknown in the USA; most published information about her seems to be from Germany. I found a vocal solo and piano arrangement published by Hal Leonard. It appears to be out of print from Hal Leonard, but if ...



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