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11

It's called the English cadence. It combines 7 and ♭7 simultaneously, and was used up to roughly Purcell's time in the UK. You can find an example at the end of Thomas Tallis's Spem in allum. Here's another example from Tallis (O sacrum convivium):


9

The rules about parallal octaves only apply when writing Bach chorale-type harmony where the aim is rich harmony with no one part "sticking out" disproportionately. Because this is often the first type of harmony we are taught to write, we can fall into the trap of thinking it's the ONLY way of doing it! Orchestration is all about doubling lines, often in ...


5

Like the comments said, it's a combination of both. As a trombone player, we have the muscle memory to hit notes at what should be in tune, but what is in tune may also vary. You tune the notes based on what is in tune in context (surrounding ensemble/accompanist), the tuning will not always be A = 440, so you need to have the ability to hear tuning and ...


4

I can totally understand your question. I experienced the same thing when first learning to play guitar to accompany my singing. I have met some folks who play the guitar very well but cannot combine singing and guitar playing and do both at the same time. Even professional musicians and famous performers often choose to leave the playing up to their ...


4

In a word, no. Nothing but well oriented work will allow you to improve your voice (unless there is lack of hydration or some physiological problems to begin with, in which case proper hydration or some specific treatment may help). A lot of things can harm it, though: lack of hydration, smoking, heavy drinking, and extremely iced drinks. Some foods cause ...


3

The first note is G4. The second note is highest and is A4 (or maybe a small amount flat of A4). As for how to work out notes in the future, it's probably easiest to do it with an instrument (correctly tuned of course!) First, find out what the first note is, by finding the note that sounds the same on the instrument. Then listen for whether the music moves ...


3

Techniques to follow for a proper singing: Firstly, you should be able to put 2-3 fingers inside of your mouth when you sing vowels. Drop your jaw much more than you do in your daily conversation. Open your mouth much wider while you sing and shape it like an 'O', lest the sound gets trapped while you sing. To practice dropping the jaw - Massage all the ...


3

The only time you shouldn't have parallel octaves is when you are voice leading and want two parts to be completely independent. The reason why you wouldn't use it is that it makes two voices that should be independent sound as one. It's used very, very frequently as doubling a line by octave is very effective at making it stand out. For example in Day ...


3

There is no magic bullet (or food or drink) that will suddenly transform you from an average singer to an Idol finalist. However - what you eat or drink prior to singing can have an effect on your voice and should certainly be carefully considered. The most important thing you can do (as mentioned by others) is to be sure your body is well hydrated. Your ...


2

I sound fairly decent but I feel like I’m still missing a clear voice a little and that I’m somewhat flat and lifeless on some recordings.[...]My current routine is 5-min warm-up exercises like scales, humming, and lip roles. Then I practice singing songs that I like that have clear vocals. You are not satisfied with your tone. So you'll work 5 minutes on ...


2

For the violin it is a combination of both muscle memory and micro-adjustments. The violinist is always adjusting as she plays. To the great virtuoso Jascha Heifetz is attributed the following quote: "I play as many wrong notes as anyone, but I fix them before most people can hear them."


2

First of all, there are many muscles and membranes and other tissues involved in the process of singing - from the muscles that control the diaphragm to the muscles that control parts of your face and tongue and all points in between. And all muscles and tissues in the human body tend to atrophy and lose elasticity as we age. To keep this answer shorter, ...


2

"Head voice" refers to any singing where the singer 'feels' resonance in the head/cheek area, or alternately refers to high notes that sound strong (even falsetto). In other words it's a vague and confusing term. "Chest voice" similarly refers to singing where resonance can be felt in the chest (e.g. if you place your hand over your chest and sing). It has ...


2

I like using a vocal processor to add various effects to my vocals when performing live on stage. The type vocal processors I have used are like "pedals" or stomp boxes that can be controlled with footswitches but similar vocal effects processors can be mounted to a microphone stand or rack mounted. The vocal processors (some also include guitar effects ...


2

The "best" option really depends on your budget. A very reasonable solution would be to use a mixer and route to an effects processor unit. There are also mixers with built in effects, but these effects can often be total garbage (especially on inexpensive mixers) so be aware of that. Mixing from a laptop will likely be more difficult to do in a live ...


2

Weak head voice is a common problem for many singers, but it's definitely something that can be circumvented. Usually, beginners find there's a "weakening" in the head range. A weaker head voice also comes from fear or reluctance. There are ways you can strengthen your head voice... Head Voice Techniques: To work on head voice, the first advice is to ...


1

It may sound a tad abstract, but it helped for me: Try to not focus on what you're playing on the guitar and on what you're singing, but try to listen to the piece of music that you're playing as a whole. The vocals and guitar are just two components of a musical piece and in a song they come together. A perfect example for this convergence is an ...


1

Technically speaking, a mezzo soprano tends to favor the lower and/or be overall better suited towards the lower soprano range (though not an alto) while still having a soprano timbre overall, though usually a bit darker as a result. Ideally, a mezzo soprano is a mezzo soprano and it thus not 'slightly weak' (as you put it) compared to a regular soprano -- ...


1

This does not sound like "warmup" but rather like pre-stress. The purpose of warmup generally is to align your reflexes to the realities of today's state of voice and atmosphere and give an additional loosening up. However, the durations you are talking about here would seem excessive for that. It rather sounds like your "warmup" is for getting your vocal ...


1

"How do I know whether I feel" is not a sensible question. The only person qualified to know what you feel is yourself. At any rate, for singing you want to project your voice. You are not interested in getting your neck or pharynx to vibrate but rather the air in the ear of the listener. If you are singing efficiently, your vocal cords are working ...



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