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4

Singing "in parts" means that each voice (such as soprano, tenor, alto, and bass) has its own independent line to follow. The contents of that line will be written out, and will depend on the composer or arranger and the harmonic structure of the piece. These parts may form consonances or dissonances with one another, and they may move in parallel motion ...


3

The voice parts are designed to overlap but be distinct. You won't find a spot where everyone will be perfectly comfortable - the objective of warmups is to stretch everyone to expand every part's range. If you want to focus on particular keys, exercise the parts in pairs (bass/alto, tenor/soprano). Remember that the focus of warmups is not to sound pretty ...


2

To my ears it sounds like "growling". There are many ways of adding "distortion" to the voice and that is one of them. It is common in gospel singing. To learn the technique, one way is to try to imitate the Cookie Monster and experiment with making it feel comfortable (position of the tounge, jaw, etc). There are also a lot of tutorials on YouTube and the ...


2

I don't think it has a name, other than singing with a "rasp" or "singing dirty". This is a powerful effect used often in soul music (and inspired by the technique of prominent African-American singers in the earlier days of recorded music, such as Mahalia Jackson). However, there are few voice teachers who would deliberately and knowingly teach you to sing ...


2

This kind of singing is called scat singing.


1

Most folks can sing, after a fashion, but if you feel you can't, don't worry. Use your internal voice. You can listen to phrases, then try to copy them. Record your own - then you know what key they're in - and play them back to copy. As you do, you'll probably mentally map out what they will play like. This is more important. Chances are that with higher ...


1

Clever question, but - I'm afraid there isn't... It does always depend on different factors like the tonality etc. If your melody uses mainly the notes of the underlying chord progression you are likely to use also these chord notes. If your melody is more diatonic and using the whole scale you would rather end up with 3rds or 6ths forming the second ...


1

If having a particular sound image is helping you, and you don't aspire to greater things, what you're doing is fine. However, if you want to consider a different approach, I'll describe one: In the beginning, you may listen to a recording of a piece or song you want to work on once, to form general impressions of the piece or song. Now work with the ...


1

It's one way to go, but then you'll end up as a clone to each singer of each song, because you'll be using their phrasing and intonation. Better to take a song as a song, and sing it your way. Imagine every cover version of a song being sung in exactly the same way. Pointless? Probably every singer started out imitating, but most will find themselves sooner ...



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