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5

Can 'do' be any pitch one wishes?, i.e. does this mean everybody chooses their own key to sing in, transposing the music while singing? A movable 'do' can indeed be any pitch, however, in a group setting, the entire group must use the same any pitch. Otherwise, you get unintended multitonality, and chaos! If needed, the group's leader could pick a pitch ...


4

Short answer is yes, it comes with practice. But for the best results, you need to focus your practice on your goal, rather than just singing songs, and hoping to improve. Play a single note. This can be on a keyboard, a guitar, pitch pipes, or whatever other instrument you have, including a keyboard app for your phone. Instead of singing immediately, take ...


4

Movable Do is called such because it is just that: movable. Movable Do focuses on intervallic relationships. When you change keys, "Do" becomes the new tonal center for that key and all of the other solfege syllables are transposed accordingly. For example, in the key of D, "D" would be "Do". If we changed keys to "F", "F" would now be "Do." Fixed Do ...


3

I do not know all the pros and cons, but I do know a few: Pros: Having an ear monitor means that you won't really need a normal monitor to hear. So, you move around the stage freely, and wherever you go, you'll be able to hear through your ear monitor. The sound is being sent directly into the canal of your ear, thus you'll be able to hear the music ...


3

To be honest, I think you're on the wrong track. I don't believe that there can be a universal and objective tool that does what you want. What you need is an experienced teacher / vocal coach who will listen to the way you sing, the way you breathe, and who can tell you what you should focus on and which techniques and exercises should be used to achieve ...


2

I play both cello and E-bass live with rock bands. For cello (and I daresay this would extend to most other acoustic instruments, if to a lesser degree) in-ears are nothing short of a blessing. With conventional monitoring, feedback is always a very serious threat; with in-ear it's seldom an issue at all. I can always hear my notes excellently, which makes ...


1

Sounds like you have goals you'd like to meet, but art in general, including singing, is utterly subjective so as to whether you're meeting them or not is really up to you. I guess there are a few technical things which are easy to 'yae/nae', but with caveats: Are you singing in tune ? You can probably decide this for yourself but a second/third opinion ...


1

There are DIY plans available online to build a "practice cube," or if you're rich you could buy a commercial one :-) . see for examples, http://www.drummagazine.com/features/post/DIY-Build-Your-Own-Soundproof-Home-Studio/ http://www.totallyhomeimprovement.com/other-rooms/soundproofing-band-practice-space ...


1

Depends what kind of soundproofing but for singing maybe you'd want somethign with a bit of reverberation (ie not completely dead sound) ? If so then maybe something harder on the inside layer to reflect some sound back at you, then a layer outside of thick soundproofing panels. That would work both ways - stop sound going out as well as in, but the ...


1

Check that if you rap it without any rhythm/instruments in the background, you can at least pick up a rhythm from the syllables in the lyrics - ie that they imply a rhythm, or work with an implied one. This depends on how it scans with the music, I guess. I don't think it's easy/possible to lay down rules about what works. Rap with gaps between the lines ...



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