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6

What you are referring to is vibrato, not tremolo. All singers use some amount of vibrato. These days the use of strong vibrato is mostly associated with opera singing, but this was not always the case. Vibrato helps you sing louder, and with less fatigue to the voice. Some singers learn to sing with a little vibrato or a lot, and learn how to control how ...


5

When you are singing from your diaphragm correctly, every breathing muscle on the way up has an influence on the breath pressure. When you lock stuff up, fewer muscles are involved. Which means fewer things that can go wrong. When children start walking, they may lock their knees to reduce the variables they have to keep under control. It's not the ...


5

Have you tried a vocal teacher/coach? Find a good teacher who will be honest with you. Ask them to give you the honest truth, upfront. Also, they should be able to help you improve your singing as well, which will make your situation all the better. Also, as you sing more and more in public, you should not only become more comfortable, but also a better ...


4

Here are some suggestions Teaching oneself to sing isn't as simple as learning an instrument. There are limitations to what we can teach ourselves. Seek a teacher! What immediately concerns me is this: I cannot really get my throat voice that high, if I try it soon ends up sore It is this kind of behavior that leads to injury. If your are sore, ...


4

While I feel amalgamate's post is the answer you are looking for, I can offer some suggestions to objectively improve/compare your singing volume. Seek one-on-one vocal instruction. While singing in a group you learn to focus on blending your voice with others, this could definitely deter your ears from remembering what your voice sounds like and could ...


3

Yes, there is a correct way to sing without belting or projecting. Singing from the diaphragm will absolutely take your singing to the next level - it just takes discipline to develop. Hang in there. Singing technique is no joke and WILL make all the difference in your singing career, be it for personal enjoyment or fame. However, if you feel you aren't ...


3

"Just for fun or getting feedback" -- don't attempt to mic the vocal and the piano separately. Mic the room. This is the only easy way to get a natural sounding recording. If you close-mic any instrument, you'll get a recording without any of the natural effects added by the room, and you'd have to compensate with artificial reverb, EQ and so forth. Studio ...


3

There are several ways to get more comfortable with the sound of your voice and get feedback. First, try Karaoke. Not sure where you live but I am sure there are venues which have Karaoke nights. It was karaoke that made me realize I could sing better than average and started my journey into performing. It was the genuine feedback I got the first time ...


3

I struggled with this as well. A few tips to build on the other answers: Do it early and often. Assuming there are no other constraints and you are at home or somewhere you can control this, flip on the recording even during your warm ups. Until you get over your apprehension, record everything and anything, and if you thought a particular segment went ...


2

You need weekly lessons with a good, qualified teacher to develop vibrato and learn to control it. There is no substitute for lessons in person with a teacher. Conversely, a very few people have a lot of vibrato in their voice, naturally and with no training. That was me as a young man. I had to get a voice teacher to teach me to reduce and control my ...


2

It's called 'red light fever'. The only way to get over it is… to get over it. Harsh but true. Normally, it only occurs once the record light is on; if it's happening before you even decide what to record, then it is in danger of becoming existential uncertainty. The process is in your hands, for good or ill. Decide. Record. Analyse. If you don't like ...


2

This site says that the average whisper is 30db and the Fortissimo (loud) singer is around 80 db. I found another site that suggested that Opera singers can reach past 100db (it was less specific so I take it with a grain of salt). This site and others say that average shouting voice is about 88db. So I would conclude that the range of useful singing ...


2

Skype should work, or perhaps zoom https://www.zoom.us/. Your problems have nothing to do with VoIP (if you can tolerate the latency) but with the playback setup in PA. Get a decent sound card, a decent headset and perhaps a headphone pre-amp. If the acoustic piano is really that loud, try a noise cancelling headphone.


2

Sing. With regard to vocal practice, there is little point in not practising the whole range. You need that for connected registers, stable tonal quality, good vocal closure and endurance. With regard to your performance vocal range, you pick that for which you can deliver results and performance satisfactory for you and listeners. Whether or not you ...


2

Can you read music, or, more importantly do you know the rhythm that you are trying to sing and that is tripping you up? that is to say, do you understand what is going on rhythmically? From my experience as a teacher when students struggle with this it is because they do not understand parts of the rhythm that they cannot feel "naturally." So, if you ...


1

The problem could easily lie with either the way the musicians are playing the music or your inability to hear it and yourself clearly in the monitors. It may have nothing to do with your ability to keep tempo at all. Many very talented and gifted vocalist who can sing karaoke or with a backing track they practice with, do just fine - until they try to ...


1

When I started having singing lessons I got worse. This is because my teacher had to break down my old bad habits and start me over again, building new ones along the way. After a while, I got better. I learned to use my diaphragm (and got really loud in the process). I learned to control tone and power over the full range of my voice (which got bigger). I ...


1

It looks like there's a software called OhmStudio that might meet your requirements, at http://www.ohmstudio.com/ . However, as others have pointed out, latency can be a real issue here. Data won't transfer over the internet instantaneously, so there might be some latency - you both likely won't be able to hear each other in real time. As per my above ...


1

For this, and the other recording you asked about, and obviously any future recordings you will be doing, a better solution will be to arm yourself with an extra mic. This may well involve a small mixer as well, but lots of gear = lots of fun. One mic is really too much of a compromise, but with two, balancing signals is a doddle.Proper mics will always give ...


1

I'm not sure this is really an answer, but probably I'll ramble on for way too long to be a comment. Tremelo/vibrato can be stylistic or masking; blending or highlighting. Genre will also dictate which of these may be 'compulsory' for that style. Opera, for instance, appears to make it almost mandatory [not a genre I'm a fan of] I've heard many instances ...


1

I was taught by some splendid teachers that a relaxed voice will produce a moderate, pleasing vibrato, or spin. It is actually more work to produce a flat (not pitch wise) tone, though some music styles call for it, and it is often desirable for certain choral work. The natural spin is to be distinguished from a manufactured vibrato that requires a real ...


1

I can briefly explain what vocal vibrato means to me; it means that you are currently executing phonation with a perfect mouth shape and inner-space.. hence a natural vibrato is the result (it's not actually "forced"; but allowed to happen naturally). The first time I did it I was blown away.. because I didn't "do it". I practiced proper technique and one ...


1

Vibrato should usually be a natural phenomenon of a relaxed powerful voice but with the advent of amplification it has changed to more of a stylistic choice. Check out Nina Hagen's "Naturträne" and compare it with other songs from the same punk album (like "Unbeschreiblich weiblich"). It is obvious that her use of her operatically trained voice is both ...


1

I can totally relate to your anxiety. I remember my first session in the studio to record one of my original songs. I was very nervous. The first time was exponentially more nerve racking than any subsequent sessions. So think of your first session as more of an exercise in overcoming your fear of the unknown. Hopefully you will have a sympathetic ...


1

Being tone deaf is a myth usually propagated by inferior teachers. If a teacher tells you or a person you know that he cannot do music because he is tone deaf then it speak less about the persons music ability and more to the teachers inability. It is often symptomatic of teachers who do not want to go the extra mile for pupils who struggle. I have seen ...



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