Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

Not only is this quite normal for a singer, it can actually be a sign that you're breathing correctly in the more intense passages. I first experienced it when learning to breathe from the diaphragm when I first began taking voice lessons. When we sing intensely, we tend to go through a lot of air. Compared to normal breathing, this looks an awful lot like ...


3

You should start by making sure what your range is ie the notes you can comfortably sing. Baritones also have 'deep' voices make sure you are certain of what type of singer you are exactly. When you have done this the fun part begins. You can start of by just singing along with the piano. No words just try to match the sound the piano makes (Be certain the ...


3

We don't know the program--you'll need to talk to someone there to find out what exactly the prerequisites are. Usually this is the kind of question that the teacher for the course you're going to take would be happy to answer. In general for introductory theory courses they won't care at all about the quality of your voice, only that you can produce ...


3

Here are a few thoughts: If you don't already, you definitely need to develop a vocal warm-up / cool-down routine. You wouldn't run for four hours without stretching, would you? Why then would you sing? I don't have time / space here to suggest specific exercises, but I'll say you should definitely start researching. A good exercise works from the back ...


3

It sounds like Kelsey Grammer's falsetto was aiming for that high A4 but landed instead on the Bb above it. He quickly corrects himself of it, though, by shifting down to the intended A.


2

You'll probably find you don't have a single threshold between falsetto and chest/head voices, but instead these ranges overlap. Many singers work on extending the range of their head voice upwards to have a more full-bodied sound in a higher register. Low-pitched falsetto is a bit of an oxymoron, I'm not entirely sure what you hope to achieve, but you'll ...


2

I'm not sure we can tell. The maximum vocal range is partly determined by genetics. And though 2 octaves is pretty impressive it still doesn't tell us how much more there is to explore in your voice. One possibility is that you're still far from your boundaries. In this case a professional teacher can help you radically increase your range in a few years. ...


2

I think the technique is best described as a yodel, which is defined as a quick flipping between vocal registers. A yodel isn't specific to the release of a note, but is the closest thing to a proper term for the general technique. If you're trying to describe the style for a someone, "like a yodel" might be clearer, since most people associate yodeling ...


2

The things that determine voice type are: 1) Range (to some extent, but this is not exact and expands with training, i.e., good breath support, etc.) 2) Tessitura: that is, the range of notes where the most beautiful tone is produced 3) Timbre (specifically, the location of the vocal formants, but this will be audible to a singing teacher more as tone ...


2

I'm going to be blunt. Unless you already are a good singer looking to ear train, your iPhone is going to be next to useless for teaching you to sing. Despite the fact I'm at least 4th generation show-business, coming from a long line of singers, I had zero clue how to actually sing until I took some lessons. There are resonant centers in your body ...


1

I am 78 years old and can still bring up a rasp when I feel it needed. When younger I used it a lot and it will give you some trouble with sore vocal chords but it has always been worth it to me to let my passion go forth with a song and the consequences do not seem to warrant too much concern in my opinion. JimE.Mel


1

Your question is like "what height can I expect to clear when getting professional sports training? I currently jump over boulders of height $x." in more than one respect. First, in the fixation on range as a single factor. Professional singing is not primarily a frequency competition: the problem is not making high/low-pitched noises, but rather sounds ...


1

I think it always depends on the practice of the singer. Correct! Vocal cord needs to be hydrated and well loosed and drinking cold water contracts the muscles. But there is always an exemptions to the rules and as for me and my practice, drinking cold water helps me and my throat relax especially when performing. I've been singing since i was 5 and now ...


1

Besides sleep and hydration, which are key, you should warm up and cool down. Also, like any endurance activity, you have to train up to it at a measured pace and there will always be a limit to how long you can go. If you are hoarse all the next day you are probably hurting your voice, and that damage can be permanent or semi-permanent. If you get nodules ...


1

As others have said: most sight-singing classes don't care if your voice sounds well. It's all about reading, keeping rythm and holding pitch. It's not a voice lesson. You're not becoming an opera singer, you're developing a more intimate relation to written music. For holding pitch, which I suspect is your main concern, a lot of it is about building ...


1

Unless you are going to be a singer, don't worry too much about vocal quality. Obviously, there are books you can read on vocal pedagogy to help with healthy singing technique, but probably not necessary in your case; ask your singer friends for some pointers and I'm sure they'll be happy to help you out. One of the ways I learned to sight-sing that was ...


1

I'm jumping right into products, sorry in advance. These are some of the best around, but there are others in each product category that would do the same thing. There are in fact programs that will do exactly what you're asking, but they aren't inexpensive. Steinberg's Cubase, a digital audio workstation, will record a mono track of your voice through a ...


1

When using "Czardas" as an example for portamento identity, it's important to note that the interpretive portion of the piece is heavily rubato, disregarding time/tempo and leaving much to expression. A clear definition of portamento (as I perform it, attacking a note and sliding to another with no discernable voicings in between,and almost immediately ...


1

Tim's answer coveres the vocal straining / hearinign yourself issue, but other factors I have noticed myself : Are the band in tune? The vocalist doen'st stand a chnace if someone is out of tune with the rest. Which note should he/she settle on ? Which instruments are too loud ? My band has been using a new bassist for the last year as our usual guy got ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible