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5

There are already some good answers on how to learn technique, and just getting out there and singing. I wanted to give some ideas as to how to listen to yourself outside your head. One method to listen to yourself is to use an audio recorder. The average phone will be adequate, although if you have higher quality equipment, it might be better. But speed ...


4

I'm going to guess that the major factor is breathing. High notes in particular really need good breath support, and your workout is prepping you to take full breaths and have good posture for breathing. It also sounds like you're coming away from your exercise with an "energized" feeling. Singing is a physical process, but it involves a coordination of ...


2

Sweeping means a similar thing to swaying when it comes to describing melodies. The perfect example I can think of is Muse's 'Bliss': Notice the way that the opening melody is ...


2

High frequencies are more intense than deep frequencies. A bass, for example, can be boosted in an audio track without great differences for the ear. Turn up the high frequencies and your track will start to screech. The human ear notices high pitched notes better than deeper ones, which explains why the catchy part of songs are often sung higher than a ...


2

My inexperienced ears tell me the high sound is disconnected from the low. Plus, the high sound is pretty thin. Thus, I don't see it as head voice. Going a bit off topic: Head voice is a tricky concept. I have just covered it with my vocal teacher and, to be honest, it's not something you should force yourself to do. It is something that comes naturally as ...


1

Well, first your won descriptions make it very likely that you get the pitches all wrong. A5 is about the top pitch for a choir soprano, and you state that it is in your non-falsetto zone. My guess is that you've checked your pitch on some chart without taking into account that tenor parts are these days generally written one octave higher than they sound ...


1

One technique to relax the muscles in your throat (and open it up) is to keep your lips together and create a motorboat sound. You do this three times, each time until you run out of breath. It may sound silly but it does work. I had vocal cord surgery a couple of years ago to supplement a paralyzed vocal cord. When I had no voice I had developed a ...


1

Most vocal styles can be performed without damage. The important thing is to listen to what the body tells you. If you get a lot of pain with some technique, sore throat for long time intervals etc., then this will be damaging in the long run. A lot of people, me included, have been using "dangerous" techniques like screaming and growling for decades ...


1

Short answer: singing is all about breathing, and thanks to working out, you've just given your lungs (and all the muscles around them) a very good warmup. Long answer: There are a lot of muscles involved in singing; I had a voice teacher who was fond of saying 'if you're not a sweaty mess by the end of a concert, you're doing something wrong'. A big part ...


1

I've been researching for years. I've been trying different teachers, books, forums, etc... The only real help I got came from Brett Manning's cd lessons. I am not affilated at all and I can say that he allowed my voice to do things impossible for me before. Just one last thing: without a (great) teacher you're taking more than twice the time you need to ...


1

Your vocal chords are muscles. Any exercise without proper training can do more damage than good. Singing is no different. Approach singing like you would a workout: warm up, exercise, cool down. Warm ups usually consist of singing scales to stretch the vocal chords at varying volumes: soft, medium, loud. Additionally, stretch your neck and face by ...



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