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9

This answer actually has two parts: Melisma is when a vocalist sings multiple pitches on one syllable. When you hear music in this way, you would say that the music is melismatic. Coloratura is a "coloring" of musical figuration meant to embellish the musical line. In Handel's time, much of the embellishing was improvised over the written line. It also ...


6

I would like to expand on @jjmusicnotes' answer. When a number of notes for one syllable are written out in the sheet music by the composer, the term used to describe this is melisma. When the performer chooses to add additional notes in an improvisational manner (notes which are not written out by the composer), the usual term for this is ornamentation. ...


3

A Russian bass is a person that can easily reach a deep-ranged basso profondo. It is named like this, because these notes appeared in a lot of Slavic composers' works. Per Wikipedia: Many basso profondos have trouble reaching those notes, and the use of them in works by Slavic composers has led to the colloquial term "Russian bass" for an exceptionally ...


3

This is not meant to be harsh in any way, I'm just examining possibilities… We start from not knowing what you actually do sound like. Presumably, as you can play an instrument, you can also hit roughly the right note when singing [though it's not a guarantee, it's a fair bet]. Trouble is, without hearing you, no-one can say whether it's because you just ...


3

I'm not sharing yo's misgivings. I use a dynamic mic- Shure 58 (others are available!) just like a heck of a lot of other stage vocalists. It's on a boom stand sited on the opposite side of the keys to where I sit/stand.So it points directly at me, as a mic should. It doesn't pick up anything extraneous, and is only switched on when I'm singing. The stage ...


2

The answer is: It depends. It depends on your expectations, on the type of music and type of playing you do, what type of piano have you got etc. I don't have so much experience and very likely someone else will come with a better answer, but I'll share my 2 cents worth. You have the following options: a headset: They can do a really good job and ...


2

As far as I'm aware, there is no specific plugin that will transcribe what you sing in to it, I think that's probably too complex a task. You can however run an Autotune plugin that has a display of the note you are singing and write down the notes yourself, or pull up a piano vst and just find the notes you're singing.


2

You could rest on your knees with your pad below it (imagine someone on their knees in prayer, but with a pillow to cushion their knees). This would allow you to keep your diaphragm, neck and head straight but also keep your knees comfortable with the floor. Sitting with your legs crossed is definitely going to make it more difficult for you to push project ...


1

The basic answer to the question is yes, to plus or minus a couple of notes. As the other answer states, even if the range becomes bigger, the outside sounds may not be particularly pleasant, especially dependent on the words sung. I've lost count of the number of times I've had to change the key of songs in different bands - it often makes a heck of a ...


1

You should consider this free online class. That seems to be perfectly suited for you. And it just started.


1

Since Max Matthews pioneering piece Daisy, singing synthesis has been informed by research in speech synthesis and phonetics. A voice may be modeled as an excitation (the glottis) filtered by a resonant cavity, which can be done by analysing recorded vocal sounds with linear predictive coding and then regenerating the sound with independent control of pitch ...


1

Uh, all the way down to the contra octave? It's only very deep basses who can dip into the contra octave convincingly (contra-B, its highest note, is already really, really low, requiring 2 auxiliary ledger lines below the bass clef system to write down). E in the small octave is still pretty low for a soprano. It's about a fourth below what you would ...



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