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6

It's not arbitrary. American accents in choral singing (especially Southern) produce several disadvantages in tone, tuning and volume. Specifically, the American hard "r" forces the speaker/singer to close the jaw and lift the tongue, both of which reduce the air space within the mouth and the back of the throat, reducing resonance. The result when singing ...


6

It's common for a certain musical style to be associated with a certain accent. Adele ditches her Norf Laaaaaaandan accent for a distinctly American sound when she's belting out her latest soul-tinged ballad. Birmingham (UK)-born Ali Campbell of reggae act UB40 does a half-decent job of sounding like a Jamaican. On the flip side, punk singer Joey Ramone's ...


6

It's a bit old-fashioned, and reasons have to do with placement (our accent has a lot of nasalization of vowels) and airflow restriction (try saying "er" as you normally do, and then the way the Brits do it, and you'll see that you don't restrict the airway as much in the latter). However, while these reasons may be musical reasons, they are also pretty ...


2

If you're game to choral works there is a tremendous amount of repertoire available, including more classical based works and popular (i. e. folk) songs from all parts of the world arranged for choir. Try a google search specifying "choral" or "choir score", or let us know some more specific taste preferences for some more oriented guidance. Regarding pop ...


2

The first note is G4. The second note is highest and is A4 (or maybe a small amount flat of A4). As for how to work out notes in the future, it's probably easiest to do it with an instrument (correctly tuned of course!) First, find out what the first note is, by finding the note that sounds the same on the instrument. Then listen for whether the music moves ...


1

Both, of course. How would a singer prevent himself from hearing his voice by all available methods? Nowadays they will also listen to recordings.


1

I am a professional Baritone and unfortunately get colds all the time. You must ensure that you do not strain your voice - if you can't get a note, stop trying and try the next day. To ease your full range back, there are a couple of things you could do: 1) Try vocal exercises like starting on a C, and singing 1-5, 5-1, 1-9, 9-1, and gradually moving up by ...


1

My tip - hope it's accurate as it seems to work for me For dynamic mics go with a cardioid dynamic mic instead of a supercardioid mic - the reason is that supercardioid mics have a smaller pattern to pick up your voice which is great for a standing vocalist who wants to reject ambient noise and for feeback suppresion on stage. For a singing pianist who ...


1

I believe that a tenor - for example, sings with the vocal chords 'closed' in head voice but still maintains the tenor range. The same voice singing in falsetto opens the chords and sings in an 'artificial' range. I suppose that an excellent example in (old) popular music is Roy Orbison who seamlessly crossed from chest to falsetto. In classical and ...



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