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Both, of course. How would a singer prevent himself from hearing his voice by all available methods? Nowadays they will also listen to recordings.


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I am a professional Baritone and unfortunately get colds all the time. You must ensure that you do not strain your voice - if you can't get a note, stop trying and try the next day. To ease your full range back, there are a couple of things you could do: 1) Try vocal exercises like starting on a C, and singing 1-5, 5-1, 1-9, 9-1, and gradually moving up by ...


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My tip - hope it's accurate as it seems to work for me For dynamic mics go with a cardioid dynamic mic instead of a supercardioid mic - the reason is that supercardioid mics have a smaller pattern to pick up your voice which is great for a standing vocalist who wants to reject ambient noise and for feeback suppresion on stage. For a singing pianist who ...


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I believe that a tenor - for example, sings with the vocal chords 'closed' in head voice but still maintains the tenor range. The same voice singing in falsetto opens the chords and sings in an 'artificial' range. I suppose that an excellent example in (old) popular music is Roy Orbison who seamlessly crossed from chest to falsetto. In classical and ...



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