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17

Simple solution - record yourself and play it back, to yourself and others.Do it a capella after giving yourself a key, and play along to the recording;and while playing guitar,You'll soon find out.It also sorts out good friends from bad ! Playing and singing with others also gives good feedback.


14

If you can hear yourself being out of tune, chances are you can teach yourself to fix it... or work with a vocal coach who is experienced enough in communicating HOW to change your technique... I've worked miracles with students who thought they couldn't sing in the past, and the results are wonderful for both teacher and student. On the other hand, if you ...


14

There's an excellent book by Gerald Klickstein called The Musician's Way that is the best treatment of this topic I've come across. Klickstein is a guitarist as well, but the methodology he advocates is applicable to any instrumentalist Keep a practice log Split your practice time among these broad categories: New material Developing material ...


13

Sounds to me like he's pushing his voice a lot harder to get over the band volume. In an acoustic situation, he's singing in a more relaxed way, but put all the instruments in, at a volume which is probably unnecessary anyway, and the sing becomes more of a shout. By turning up his mic a balance will partially be restored, (but his ears will still tell him ...


12

You can use software to analyze your voice. There is software that will draw a chart of what you sang (the frequencies you sang), where you can see how close or far you were from each note. Some options include Melodyne, Waves Tune, Nectar, Canta, GSnap. There are a lot of options out there, from all the price range (some free). On these charts your voice ...


11

In this context, "Naturstimme" means "untrained voice". It's neither a compliment nor a detraction. I believe that he is pointing out that you do not sound like a classically-trained singer who learns to sing in the operatic manner. Whether he would prefer a "Naturstimme" or a "Kunstgesangstimme" (an "art-song-trained" voice) for his choir is another ...


10

I would say yes, and yes. You've explained the problem pretty clearly, and explained its consequence. Choirs frequently find that they sing everything internally, consistently in-tune throughout a piece, but then at the end of the piece, they discover that they are no longer in tune with the reference pitches upon which they started the piece. The frame of ...


10

Inflammation. What inflammation is is the engorgement of tissue with blood in response to that issue releasing a signaling chemical (histamine) that dilates blood vessels. That is why inflamed tissue is redder than usual. Theory is that the body has this response to rush additional white blood cells to the site of a lesion. (An allergic reaction is one ...


8

The song "Wonderful Dream" was written by Melanie Thornton (1967-2001). She was an American singer who had commercial success in Europe while remaining unknown in the USA; most published information about her seems to be from Germany. I found a vocal solo and piano arrangement published by Hal Leonard. It appears to be out of print from Hal Leonard, but if ...


8

Well, you have to use the fact that the sound you produce is caused by air, which is pushed up from your lungs, and this in turn is controlled by the tension in the muscles around them. Singing teachers or voice trainers often refer to anchoring, support and other ideas to describe this. The aim is to have the muscles in your torso (diaphragm and others on ...


8

Craig, the other answers all address the possibility that his "singing nowhere near as good" is because he's getting drowned out by the other band members. There's another possiblity as well. If he sings very well by himself, accompanying himself, that doesn't necessarily translate into singing well with other people who are accompanying him. It's a ...


8

Learning to create your own vocal harmony part along with a melody is often something that musicians learn intuitively, through listening to a lot of music, but also by singing in a band or choir. Having said this, there is nothing wrong with taking a short cut towards gaining this skill, by using a little musical knowledge. You can create vocal (or any ...


8

I think it will be difficult to answer this question in exactly the way you framed it because these voice types are not something that exist in nature — they are categories conventionally agreed upon to describe a complicated natural phenomenon (or, I'd argue, confluence of phenomena). The best analogy I can think of is asking what percent of people are ...


7

To complement Karol's excellent answer covering the mechanics of vocal sound production, there is another side, that of human audio perception. The human ear tends to perceive higher frequencies as having greater intensity even at the same volume as a lower frequencies. This is why Bass Amplifiers have to be so enormous to compete with a smaller guitar ...


7

A few things: This is questionably on-topic, because the material in your question seems to address your accent much more than it does the actual technique of vocal production. You didn't record yourself singing, for example, so I am presuming that's not really what you're looking for. That said, much of the discussion here applies equally well to music ...


7

It's interesting that to me your example doesn't sound natural at all. To me it seems that the sound was intentionally designed to sound unnatural. I guess "natural" is a pretty broad and somewhat subjective concept, so for simplicity we will define "more natural" as "inducing less change" and "less natural" as "inducing more change". I can think of 4 ways ...


6

I'm sure others will have more detail to give, but the answer seems pretty clear to me: breath support. Unfortunately, the way to develop stronger breath support is with all the non-musical exercises your teachers have given you over the years. Here are a few: Hiss like a snake. Sssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss. Until you run out of breath. You want to ...


6

Smoking greatly increases the chance that you will develop vocal nodes, and that the quality of your voice will be permanently changed. After years of singing, many singers, even those who do not smoke, suffer from permanent, tiny lesions or scar tissue that grow on the vocal cords. These are called vocal nodes, and they make the voice sound rough and weak. ...


6

I agree with Tim. A lot of bands tend to crank up their instruments way too loudly which is unfortunate. Everybody wants to be heard. Vocals are crucial for a vocal based band and the band should really work on mixing. Things you can do are make sure that the Vocalist can be heard clearly over all of the other instruments, especially the lead guitar and ...


6

We are talking about two kinds of breathing: Costal breathing, the lifting of the ribcage, and diaphragmatic breathing, the manipulation of the diaphragm, which is the most powerful muscle in the body and which sits just below the lungs. Proper singing involves a combination of costal and diaphragmatic breathing. However, raising your shoulders and raising ...


6

When your shoulders rise, you engage your ribcage with a mixture of breath work and other mechanical business. Both disrupt the connection to the diaphragm where you want to anchor the base of your breath control and resonance. Controlling breath with your rib cage is like trying to run with your calves. Of course they are involved, but you don't want to ...


6

Vowels are formed using formants: the basic characteristic particularly of chest voice is a "pulse train" which has lots of harmonics. Those harmonics are then amplified or dampened depending on the shape of the mouth. The strongest surviving harmonics are called "formants". Basically, one hears the mouth shape under the "lighting" of the voice box, and ...


5

Vocalists tend to be over-dramatic and hyper-sensitive when it comes to their voices - not much different than reed players complaining about their reeds or brass players complaining about their lips. Honestly, it depends on how well you warm up, your vocal stamina, and how long you need to sing for. If you don't sing often at all and need to sing for a ...


5

According to a post at the New York University Medical School answer center, smoking and exposure to smoke irritate and dry the tissues of the throat, particularly the vocal cords. This leads to improper vocal cord vibration and function. Smoking also may promote acid reflux, which can affect the vocal cords. Finally, smoking degrades lung function, ...


5

The answer is almost everyone can learn to sing. There is a small percentage of people who suffer from amusia, which encompasses "tone deafness" and the ability to distinguish between different pitches. For such people, learning to sing is exceedingly difficult, because they cannot hear that they are making a mistake, so they can't even really tell what ...


5

It mainly depends on the RANGE of the song in question.In a song which has notes too high to sing comfortably, it needs to be lowered. Let's take it down a tone. This could make the highest notes easier to sing, and would make the lowest notes only a little lower - no big deal. But - if that song was moved down by a 4th, then the lowest notes would also be a ...


5

I don't think it's unreasonable for a singer to accommodate the band with regard to a key change interval of a whole or half-step, or not. If your singer cannot do this, then maybe you need to find a better singer. But please read on. The short answer is that it depends on the particular song paired with a particular singer, and there is no hard-and-fast ...


5

I can't recall ever seeing it, but do people use pop filters in a live/concert/performance setting? I see where you are coming from. We see all these vocalists almost eating the mic and screaming and doing things that should flood the sound with loud plosives, but they don't. And they are not using pop filters... Or are they? In fact, they are using pop ...


4

Getting your pitch right as a singer is about as important as setting your foot where you intended as a dancer. I would not really take this as a metric of vocal progress of a "singer" even though there are successful singers astonishingly off-pitch (particularly noticeable with long notes). Being off-pitch makes it unfeasible to sing leggiero lines, ...


4

As some commenters mentioned, rearranging the music to fit a key more appropriate for the singer is typically what would be done for professional productions (both with the licensing and resources to do so). I'm guessing you don't want to have to transpose all the music for your pit band (and have them learn it) in two weeks. I can't offer too much in terms ...



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