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18

This is actually not uncommon. You perform all of them! In this example, the soprano section splits into two parts. Half of the sopranos sing the top note, and the other half of the sopranos sing the bottom note. At the same time, the tenor section splits into two parts. First and second soprano, first and second tenor. Therefore in this short example ...


11

It's called the English cadence. It combines 7 and ♭7 simultaneously, and was used up to roughly Purcell's time in the UK. You can find an example at the end of Thomas Tallis's Spem in allum. Here's another example from Tallis (O sacrum convivium):


9

The rules about parallal octaves only apply when writing Bach chorale-type harmony where the aim is rich harmony with no one part "sticking out" disproportionately. Because this is often the first type of harmony we are taught to write, we can fall into the trap of thinking it's the ONLY way of doing it! Orchestration is all about doubling lines, often in ...


8

Puberty. That's what is happening. During puberty, your vocal cords are going through a lot of changes which will eventually lead to a much deeper voice for males, and usually a slightly deeper voice for females. On the way, your body has not yet learnt how to control them at their new size, tension etc (similarly to the way kids get very clumsy each time ...


8

It is true that most of your singing should come from your diaphragm. The diaphragm is able to push large volumes of air across your vocal chords with little to no strain on your throat while minimizing any strain on your vocal chords. UPDATE: In reality, (from a purely technical point of view) you don't actually control the diaphragm itself when singing ...


8

Are you a singer who is primarily looking to increase your vocal performance or are you actually interested in learning the instrument for the instrument itself? I would say these two things are different. Because if you are really only interested in singing, then there are plenty of vocal exercises you can do to increase all of the things you want and much ...


7

First, you both will need patience. Learning to distinguish sounds from one another is not a simple process. Imagine if you were color blind and had to reproduce the color blue after only seeing it flash in front of you for a moment. Of course, the obvious difference here is that there is little to be done for color-blind people, and hearing notes / music is ...


7

As a guitarist, you will be aware that at any given moment, a chord fits under what is being sung. The melody line may contain several notes, but for starters, if you sing one of the notes from that chord, it'll fit the melody line, just as the rest of the notes from that chord will. Basically, there will be a root, 3 and 5 in that chord, so initially, get ...


6

This is a result of excess mucus in your throat. Fly Paper recommends granny smith apples to get rid of it. The article also has other useful tips for keeping your singing voice healthy. An Apple a Day Keeps the Mucus Away. Wait…that’s not the saying, is it? An old opera trick is to keep a baggie of cubed granny smith apples backstage. The acid ...


6

Two things: You want a pop filter: You can use techniques to avoid the negative effects of sibilants (s and soft c) and plosives (t and p). Bad-sounding sibilants and plosives have one thing in common: they are unvoiced. That means that your voice box is not vibrating when you say them - they are created just with air moving past the lips and tongue. ...


6

To sing with the type intensity you hear from singers such as Dave Grohl without blowing out your vocal chords or making your throat raw requires both proper technique and some stamina (as well as certain precautions). First let's talk about stamina. Singing involves many muscles in the face, mouth and throat but the most important muscles used in ...


6

The octave the notes are written in is irrelevant in most transcribed pop vocals as there are many different types of vocalist. Remember we typically generalize vocals into 4 different groups Soprano, Alto, Tenor, and Bass and we also typically like to perceive the melody as well within the upper section of the treble staff so typically pop lead vocal parts ...


6

This kind of effect emulates the behaviour of old fashioned high impedance dynamic microphones and low fidelity amplifiers/speakers; the Shure green bullet is the most well known contemporary model of this type of microphone. Most guitar amps, public address systems like you find at bus terminal, or even the speakers at a drive through are day to day ...


6

It's a bit old-fashioned, and reasons have to do with placement (our accent has a lot of nasalization of vowels) and airflow restriction (try saying "er" as you normally do, and then the way the Brits do it, and you'll see that you don't restrict the airway as much in the latter). However, while these reasons may be musical reasons, they are also pretty ...


6

It's common for a certain musical style to be associated with a certain accent. Adele ditches her Norf Laaaaaaandan accent for a distinctly American sound when she's belting out her latest soul-tinged ballad. Birmingham (UK)-born Ali Campbell of reggae act UB40 does a half-decent job of sounding like a Jamaican. On the flip side, punk singer Joey Ramone's ...


6

It's not arbitrary. American accents in choral singing (especially Southern) produce several disadvantages in tone, tuning and volume. Specifically, the American hard "r" forces the speaker/singer to close the jaw and lift the tongue, both of which reduce the air space within the mouth and the back of the throat, reducing resonance. The result when singing ...


5

I would just add the (possibly obvious) answer that a capella choirs can also drift off because of singing out of tune. Typically, they tend to get flatter if the music has lots of jumps to high notes, which they don't quite get up to, and they sometimes get sharper if they are nervous about getting flat. I've experienced both in concerts.


5

As a guitar teacher, here is what I have always wanted students to be able to do in our first lesson: Tell me or at least know for themselves something about why they are learning guitar. The answer, "I'm not sure, I just like it" is actually one of the most promising answers, as opposed to "Well there's this girl, see?" which does not bode well, in my ...


5

I sort of disagree with the first statement: what vibrato actually is, depends on the instrument group at hand. For (at least: wood-) winds it is a variation of support, which would mainly translate to a variation in volume (but admittedly also some pitch variation as well). On strings as violin situation is opposite, that main effect is a variation in ...


5

It probably has to do with the nature of the context. Many times jumping into a dissonance, even if you were just singing the pitch, will cause you to second-guess your concept of what pitch is coming next. Harmonically, pitches can function differently based on context. B at the top of a e chord is different from B in the middle of a Gchord. Technically, ...


5

What you describe sounds like the symptoms of performance anxiety - also known as "stage fright". I used to suffer from it myself when I was first learning to sing and play guitar at the same time. I could sit in my living room by myself and play and sing songs perfectly. But the moment there was even one person listening, I totally fell apart. Could not ...


5

There is far more to singing than just the vocal folds. Much of the sound of a singers voice is shaped and influenced by muscles in the throat and face (including your nasal passages). So even if food does not come into contact with the vocal folds themselves, certain foods can have an effect on other parts of your vocal tract that can affect your singing. ...


5

There are rather few synergies between the mechanisms of playing most instruments and singing, to the degree that it makes no sense to pick up a particular instrument except for the sake of playing the instrument on its own. Lung capacity does not really change all that much and it is rarely a limiting factor in singing: it's much more important to focus on ...


5

Like the comments said, it's a combination of both. As a trombone player, we have the muscle memory to hit notes at what should be in tune, but what is in tune may also vary. You tune the notes based on what is in tune in context (surrounding ensemble/accompanist), the tuning will not always be A = 440, so you need to have the ability to hear tuning and ...


5

Yes, in principle you should try to keep the larynx low in order to achieve higher and clearer high notes, but "rock solid" is perhaps not the best metaphor, as what's needed is a high degree of relaxation and keeping that relaxation when changing register. Any attempt at exerting strength (over the larynx) will produce crispation of the larynx, the opposite ...


4

I would like to add the point that the comma pump may happen in either direction, resulting ascending or descending drift. However, tonal music is such that the intervals between the roots (the fundamentals of the chords) usually appear in one direction and not in the other: descending fifths or ascending fourths and ascending seconds, mainly. As a result, ...


4

Singing "in parts" means that each voice (such as soprano, tenor, alto, and bass) has its own independent line to follow. The contents of that line will be written out, and will depend on the composer or arranger and the harmonic structure of the piece. These parts may form consonances or dissonances with one another, and they may move in parallel motion (...


4

Most of the techniques for obtaining a raspy voice are probably not recommended. Generally speaking, a permanent raspiness is due to damaged vocal chords. Many of the well know raspy singers became raspy because of smoking.



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