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It depends on what you want to achieve. Adding reverb may be a nice idea or you could go for a gristleizer If we're talking metal there is a problem that the guitars and the female voice often occupy the same part of the spectrum. Two possible solutions are either switch back and forth like guitar-vocals-guitar-vocals or tune down the guitars.


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One technique to relax the muscles in your throat (and open it up) is to keep your lips together and create a motorboat sound. You do this three times, each time until you run out of breath. It may sound silly but it does work. I had vocal cord surgery a couple of years ago to supplement a paralyzed vocal cord. When I had no voice I had developed a ...


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I have a hypothesis that vocal fry is produced by reducing the air support to the minimum necessary to sound the vocal cords; that is, that vocal fry is a transitional effect between not giving the cords enough air to sound at all, and resounding fully. If my hypothesis is true, then you should be able to eliminate vocal fry by improving your breath support ...


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Your vocal chords are muscles. Any exercise without proper training can do more damage than good. Singing is no different. Approach singing like you would a workout: warm up, exercise, cool down. Warm ups usually consist of singing scales to stretch the vocal chords at varying volumes: soft, medium, loud. Additionally, stretch your neck and face by ...


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Most vocal styles can be performed without damage. The important thing is to listen to what the body tells you. If you get a lot of pain with some technique, sore throat for long time intervals etc., then this will be damaging in the long run. A lot of people, me included, have been using "dangerous" techniques like screaming and growling for decades ...


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You are aware of your musculature, feel it. And you are body-proud, don't need to suck your stomach in and inflate your chest. You breathe effectively rather than impressively. My own experience is actually that stuff like running right before singing is not helpful, but then I am a bass baritone singing as alto, so I have specific vocal problems not ...


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Recognizing intervals is the vertical method. That's when you hear a chord and pick out the root, 3rd, 5th, 7th, etc. It's useful, but you should also do ear training with the horizontal method. Often this is easier. You pick any note that's being sung or is part of the chord, and you "follow" it across several measures, going up or down only a step or two. ...


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I'm going to guess that the major factor is breathing. High notes in particular really need good breath support, and your workout is prepping you to take full breaths and have good posture for breathing. It also sounds like you're coming away from your exercise with an "energized" feeling. Singing is a physical process, but it involves a coordination of ...


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High frequencies are more intense than deep frequencies. A bass, for example, can be boosted in an audio track without great differences for the ear. Turn up the high frequencies and your track will start to screech. The human ear notices high pitched notes better than deeper ones, which explains why the catchy part of songs are often sung higher than a ...


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Sweeping means a similar thing to swaying when it comes to describing melodies. The perfect example I can think of is Muse's 'Bliss': Notice the way that the opening melody is ...


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Short answer: singing is all about breathing, and thanks to working out, you've just given your lungs (and all the muscles around them) a very good warmup. Long answer: There are a lot of muscles involved in singing; I had a voice teacher who was fond of saying 'if you're not a sweaty mess by the end of a concert, you're doing something wrong'. A big part ...


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I've been researching for years. I've been trying different teachers, books, forums, etc... The only real help I got came from Brett Manning's cd lessons. I am not affilated at all and I can say that he allowed my voice to do things impossible for me before. Just one last thing: without a (great) teacher you're taking more than twice the time you need to ...


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There are already some good answers on how to learn technique, and just getting out there and singing. I wanted to give some ideas as to how to listen to yourself outside your head. One method to listen to yourself is to use an audio recorder. The average phone will be adequate, although if you have higher quality equipment, it might be better. But speed ...


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There's quite an interesting change that happens in your voice when you're healthy. In men, it causes the voice to deepen and become more sonorous, and men with deep voices are perceived to be more attractive and healthy to the opposite sex. Your better vocals post workout are likely down to an increased lung capacity, and better blood flow. I'm tempted ...


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The unfortunate thing about singing is that you can do your voice and yourself damage if your technique is wrong or you over exert yourself. It's for this reason that I would say getting personal feedback is a top priority; however this doesn't mean you need to shell out hundreds on a face to face teacher. you can: Join some singing forums Sign up to ...


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My suggestion would be to work on singing from your center - using your diaphragm. While it will be nice to hone the edge of the tool (fine-tuning the pitch of your voice), you must first shape the tool into its form. Once you are able to effectively sing from your center, I think you will find that your range will be defined by how you sing when you are ...



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