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1

I am either an operatic Lyric or Verdi Baritone. This is defined by 1) tessitura, 2) range, and 3) "quality" of the voice. I know that I am a Lyric of a Verdi and not a Baryton-Martin because my voice has a heavier quality than that fach. I am actually more comfortable singing in the higher tessitura, which separates me from bass-baritones and others. Also, ...


0

Bass voices continue to mature and deepen into their thirties and beyond, so your true potential as a bass singer depends on maturation and on training. A singer develops muscle strength and mass as well as muscular skills. As you mature and develop more muscle, you need to learn to use it. This is a process that takes time and work over many years. As Paul ...


1

Glissando is a discrete portamento whereas portamento is a continuous glissando.


-1

These are all good answers. There's one idea I haven't seen mentioned. I have read that when a professional pop singer os in the recording studio, the recording engineer sets him up in such a way that he can hear the accompaniment in his headphones, but he hears himself through his headphones with extra amplification. (For some reason, this apparently ...


6

As a visual learner myself, I can see why this would seem appealing, but having tried it myself, I have to echo Some Dude's sentiment that you really don't need this. It might be neat to play with a few times, just to see what kind of fluctuation exists in your voice, but overall, its very unlikely to help you become a better singer. The reason is that if ...


4

A way to get real time visual feedback would be to sing at an electronic tuner with a built in microphone. There are phone apps available for that, or dedicated devices for $10-20. It wouldn't record and graph, though.


7

Get a teacher. You don't really need what you are asking for. You don't need to obsess over 1/100 tone fluctuations while you are, say, screwing up your voice. Without a teacher you can't possibly make a good use of the kind of software you are asking for anyway. You need to take EE 101 before using an oscilloscope, after all. I don't care how your mind ...


1

You can sing along with a piano/guitar that is playing the melody. I believe this will be really efficient, because you'll hear the exact melody and you'll see where exactly is your problem, and you can work on it. I believe the piano would be best, as it has really clear overtones that will help you listen to a crystal clear melody.


5

It depends on what you mean with "be a bass". Singing Arias with jumps and coloratura with consistent articulation, good phrasing, and carrying power across the range? Nope. Whether formal study or not, you don't get there without wagonloads of targeted practice. But it would likely be disappointing for both of you to try competing in her home space: ...


2

The disconnect between chest and head voice that you experience is completely normal. It is called the passaggio. To minimize the difference in sound between the two vocal registers, you must gradually make them meet in the middle. Chest For your chest voice, try and raise your overall range in half-step increments. Use any of the standard effective ...


0

On reading your question a second time, I realized that you said you can't hit certain notes between falsetto and chest. Without any other knowledge, that kind of sounds like nodes or some other damage to your vocal chords, but you may just be confusing octaves. Don't yell too loud and don't screech, it can really damage your voice fast. Seriously, a quick ...


1

First a disclaimer: I have never taken voice lessons nor have I sang in a formal group/choir since middle school. I sing casually for myself and my friends, and I play saxophone. The phenomenon you are describing is not unique to vocals - the same occurs when I travel through the range of my saxophone. In that case, it has a lot to do with the fact that my ...


0

The answer to your questions is the same, and that is breathing and breath support. As said by Wheat, you need constant feedback by a professional singer who can correct you and help you get the feeling, because that's what it is.


1

Take lessons from a professional voice teacher. You need constant feedback from a professional who can evaluate what you are doing and show you how to gradually improve it. Learning to sing is not something you can do by reading descriptions on web sites or in printed books.


2

Most of the time, the first note you'll need to sing will belong to the chord you're on. One of the strings will be playing that note. In practice time, isolate that note for each particular tune, and play it separately. It will usually be a 1,3 or 5 of the chord. Learn to play a chord, and sing the 1,3 or 5 of it. There will be a bonus when you start to ...


4

I have great news for you! There are sooooo many tools readily available with a simple Google search. I suggest musictheory.net, but there are so many options if you look for ear training exercises. Here's a real tough exercise that I used to do for my musicianship class: Give yourself a starting pitch. Sing up a Perfect 5th Sing down a tri-tone ...



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