New answers tagged

0

The fact that you are projecting in your high range but not in your low range makes me suspect you are singing too much with your throat and not enough with your diaphragm. It should be easier to project in the low range because you can more easily relax your whole instrument, but if you let your diaphragm relax also, then you won’t push the air that you ...


0

It's difficult to get as much projection and power in the low end of your range because to sing low notes - you must relax your vocal chords - which entails relaxing all the muscles that control the vocal chords. If I'm singing Johnny Cash or Josh Turner I will usually use a microphone and take advantage of the proximity effect. As I get to the lower and ...


3

"Instrument noise" would be the term to use I think. The German term, by the way, would be "Nebengeräusche" (literally "secondary sounds") which is less easily confused with "music as such". This distinction may be important in cases like "Jericho" where the walls fell down due to the "main sound" of the instruments according to the biblical story. ...


6

The answer, and I am serious, is "noise". "Noise" is defined as sounds that do not create a repeating oscillating waveform, which is to say that they do not produce a pitch. All instruments have components of their sound that are types of noise. Many percussion instruments, including drums, produce more noise than waveforms with pitch, but percussion ...


1

For what you are doing, you probably want an external i/o with a mic preamp. You can get a reasonably priced one from an online vendor that has a single XLR input, phantom power, and an instrument line in. You will likely want a better microphone suitable for your application. At a basic level, a USB microphone would probably suit


2

From the comments you make it sound like you get unwanted noise picked up as well. Human spatial hearing in natural environments is rather good at sorting it out and ignoring it. That does not work when recording. My first attempts to record with high-quality low-noise equipment led to some frustrations. Listening to the monitored signal, I got puzzled ...


1

If what you need is a microphone, and the internal microphone is not giving you the results you want, you should just get a USB microphone.


1

I'll be honest. For glam rock, power metal, and quite a few others, tenors and high baritones rule. Certain types of music prefer baritones because the baritone range tends to be the most singable by the majority of the population. However, if you are an actual bass, you can probably take a few tenor songs down an octave, and it can sound quite awesome. ...


1

"Waist training" (progressive use of corsets) is habit-forming. Naturally, it will progressively affect singing. Breath support is different since you are singing into the elasticity (or rather its absence) of the corset rather than your rib cage and there is progressively less elasticity and abdominal musculature to sing into. With progressive waist ...


0

I haven't seen a waist trainer, but I don't think it is as bad as Todd described it, that sounds more of a corset. I think that there is a difference, isn't it? But wearing a corset or such a waist trainer is more of a hindrance when singing than it would help. I made some exercises with my singing teacher to get the proper feeling on how I should move, ...


13

I wish I could point you to some scientific studies; I cannot. But I can speak on the basis of a lifetime of my being a semi-professional traditional choral singer and soloist who has a university music school degree in singing. I have extensive experience with a cappella choral singing, with singing accompanied by piano and organ and orchestra, and even ...


-2

I disagree with your premise that a mathematically perfect tuning would be somehow preferable and that singers would naturally gravitate towards that. Singing is a learned behavior. We gravitate towards tunings and scales that are familiar from our experience. If I grow up singing along with a piano in common tuning, playing major and minor scales, and then ...


1

The separation of mind and body is a fanciful idea, a myth. The brain is connected to a nervous system that has more neurons in it than the brains of most animals. In fact, the human hand has more neurons in it than the brains of most animals. If you touch a hot stove with your hand, your hand itself will decide to pull back from the hot stove. It won’t ...


0

Your voice is the very first instrument you have. Use it for truth and beauty and the sound will become more sonorous and appealing. Is that mind or is that muscle? It's certainly practice.


1

I think the answer is yes on both counts. Singing is an athletic, muscular activity, but it involves rather tiny muscles in the larynx, throat, face, head, mouth, tongue, you name it. Breath support in the chest and abdominal muscles, which are larger and more powerful, also comes into play. However, when you learn to sing, you don't approach it from the ...


4

Like most things (I think), it's both. You have to have the physical strength and agility to sing well. Arpeggios require quick movement of vocal chords, and sustain requires strength of the diaphragm as well as breath control. However, knowledge of how these things work, the best practices involved in singing, knowledge of how your particular body works, ...


2

If playing a wind, reed or brass instrument could improve your singing voice, then this would have been a standard part of vocal training for centuries. But it never has been, and it is not. It seems that you have imagined this idea yourself. Learning an instrument while you learn to sing is certainly a good idea from the standpoint of becoming a ...


2

These are some instruments that can help you increase your lung capacity: treadmill stationary bike stairmaster … if you play them 4–6 sessions per week at medium to high intensity. They will also help with projection by improving your endurance, relaxation, posture, and diaphragmatic power and control.


5

There are rather few synergies between the mechanisms of playing most instruments and singing, to the degree that it makes no sense to pick up a particular instrument except for the sake of playing the instrument on its own. Lung capacity does not really change all that much and it is rarely a limiting factor in singing: it's much more important to focus on ...


8

Are you a singer who is primarily looking to increase your vocal performance or are you actually interested in learning the instrument for the instrument itself? I would say these two things are different. Because if you are really only interested in singing, then there are plenty of vocal exercises you can do to increase all of the things you want and much ...


0

Generally speaking, you should sing with the same technique in a lower octave as you do in a higher octave. But the natural tendency is to tighten up as you go higher, in part because you may feel that you’re going to hit the top of your range. If you sing with an airy sound, generally speaking that should be because you intend to sing with an airy sound as ...


3

Don't let yourself be fazed by reading confusing things about Maria Callas' voice. During the years making her famous as a singer, she covered a ridiculous breadth of soprano fachs, partly at the same time in different productions. In her diva years, her voice deteriorated but she still swept the audience with her interpretation and stage presence. At any ...


1

Mezzo Soprano refers to the range of voice that lies between the contralto and the soprano voices. A mezzo-soprano or mezzo is a type of classical female singing voice whose vocal range lies between the soprano and the contralto voice types. The mezzo-soprano's vocal range usually extends from the A below middle C to the A two octaves above (i.e. A3–A5 ...


5

There is far more to singing than just the vocal folds. Much of the sound of a singers voice is shaped and influenced by muscles in the throat and face (including your nasal passages). So even if food does not come into contact with the vocal folds themselves, certain foods can have an effect on other parts of your vocal tract that can affect your singing. ...


0

The headset picks up all mouth sounds, including the ones you don't want people to hear, like a sneeze, a cough, and the heavy breathing you didn't even know you make when you launch into a solo, burps, clearing the throat, mumbles, and in my case sometimes the whiskers in my beard scratch the windscreen. Other than that the headset follows well when you ...



Top 50 recent answers are included