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I'd say you're a bass. The bass range is generally something like E2-E4. E2 is only rarely used, so the low notes you're describing are similar to those of a bass. In terms of upper range, the highest I've had to sing, as a bass, is F4. So, you're probably a bass with a good falsetto and quite a large bass. Whether you're a bass or a baritone depends on ...


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If your teachers don't consider it helpful to nail down a particular voice type at your current stage of training, do you think some random collection of people never having heard you will fare better? You need basic stamina across your accessible range anyway regardless of what you are going to end up singing since you can get hoarse on any untrained part ...


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Do most hip hop and rap artists sing in correct tune with and in the same key as the instrumental part? I think the best answer here is Yes, many do, but maybe not most. The vocals for hip-hop and rap are often very different from pop vocals, but many times there is singing in the same key as the instrumental backing. Actual rapping is normally not in any ...


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This is a question where even professional choir directors and singers can't agree on. Some do quite long vocal excersises (sometimes with all kinds of gymnastics) and some just start to sing. The excersises are not so much about not wrecking voices but more about getting in the right set of mind for reheasing and 'tuning' your vocal 'instrument'. It allows ...


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Most of the singers will be warming up during the first 5 minutes, so rather than waste (if that's the right term) those 5 mins, just get into the singing. Only if there's a great range of vocals or volume changes, which may be unusual, just 'get on with it!' Right or wrong, I did it for 30+ yrs that way.No warming up, straight into singing. Don't believe I ...


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The range of expression that a human voice is capable of never fails to surprise me. Whether it's Bulgarian deep-throated singing, German lieder, or Korean opera. What you will be able to achieve with your voice will depend upon a couple of things: Physiology - Some people have wider throats, and thicker vocal chords. They're just made that way. The idea of ...


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Daniel is correct, but I believe the "epic" effect you're referring to (as produced by a choir) is the chorus effect. From Wikipedia: In music, a chorus effect (sometimes chorusing or chorused effect) occurs when individual sounds with approximately the same timbre, and very similar pitch converge and are perceived as one. While similar sounds coming ...


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Its called a choir, which is an ensemble of human voices. So I don't have to write a long-winded answer on how a choir works, you can find out more here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choir (General choir stuff) http://www.totalchoirresources.com/lets-talk-choir-formations/ (Choir formations)


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Yes, in principle you should try to keep the larynx low in order to achieve higher and clearer high notes, but "rock solid" is perhaps not the best metaphor, as what's needed is a high degree of relaxation and keeping that relaxation when changing register. Any attempt at exerting strength (over the larynx) will produce crispation of the larynx, the opposite ...


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Chest Voice and Head Voice In simple terms... Usually, the voice with which people speak with is nothing but the chest voice. Now, Put your hand on your chest and say the vowel “a” as in “cat” nice and strong – it seems to resonate between your throat and chest...right? That’s your chest voice. Okay, now say “Yahoo!” in a cheerful manner – feel how the ...


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Chest voice is when you resonate from the diaphragm (the middle of the chest). Deep breathing before a stanza or multiple stanzas will allow you to sing with your chest. You will feel it coming from your chest and will probably be a much deeper sound. As for "head voice" I'm not sure if you mean singing through the nose. I'm pretty sure it's one or the ...


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In general, extended vocal techniques like these are indicated via a change of notehead along with a textual description of the desired effect (i.e. "whispered", "screamed", etc). The specifics of this may vary in practice, depending on the particular needs of the piece: if there are only a few isolated effects needed, for example, they could all be marked ...



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