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The word that I have heard used for this technique is "covering," as in "he shifted to a more covered tone for that high note." As Greg noted, it involves manipulating the resonance chambers of the throat to change the formant structure of the vocal tone.


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I'm not familiar with any specific name that technique has, and, really, it's a rather subtle thing that I wouldn't call a distinct technique in itself. You may hear this variously described as having a "darker" tone, or sometimes as being "throatier". What these singers are doing is opening up the back of the throat more (lifting their soft palate and ...


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I play guitar & sing in a rock 3-pieceso have to do this for whole gigs at a time - It's possibly a little different doing this on guitar to piano, but here's how I've managed it: 1) Assuming you can play the chords already, concentrate on getting the singing part right (as Marian suggests). get the rhythm of the syllables and the notes etc all sorted ...


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It is true that you can lose the lowest notes throughout the day, but 10 semitones is quite dramatic! It makes me wonder if you are straining your voice during the day. If you are, it would help to address that. Aside from that, the best thing I can suggest is spending some time practicing low notes specifically. Lower notes are generally easier for people ...


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Glissando is going through intermediate pitches musically. Portamento "carries" one pitch to another pitch: there is no interruption in tone and style and no "musical concept" of intermediate notes even though the execution might not be able to switch pitches instantly. It's pretty much the same as a slur over a larger interval. If you map this to a ...


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It is all about becoming conscious, with each syllable you sing, of the different positions and shapes of all the parts of your vocal apparatus: lips, tongue, soft pallate, and the placement of the tone in your head. And whether or not these positions are moving or changing during the production of the vowel. (if they move or change while you make one vowel ...


1

There are many techniques, and the answers so far are great, but I'll add another suggestion that works great for some folks: Modify the words mentally. Instead of singing a-bout (which can lead to funny dipthongs), think of it phonetically as uh-bah-oot. The vowel you're holding for a long time is close to "ah", and the "oo" from the u is more part of the ...


2

I don't recognize that specifically as a vocal injury, though it very well could be, so I'll give you the usual advice. Give it three or four days, drink plenty of hot tea (especially with honey, ginger, and/or lemon if you can manage it), plenty of water, and try not to overuse your voice. Specifically, no yelling over loud noises, no shouting, no ...


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Sometimes a high note is thematic - the melody HAS to go that way or it would be a different song. Sometimes it's a gesture - "look at me ending on a high note"! But there's no moral principle here, it's just a song! Will your version sound like a cop-out? In that case, practice singing higher, take the whole song lower or choose a different song that ...


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Well .. if you change the note then it's going to sound different of course (as Tim states), but you might be able to get the similar impact with a slightly lower note. An example I use is during Led Zep's "rock 'n roll". I have an 'empty' spot in my vocal range at a highish C which is about where that song's vocal line resides. If I'm tired, my voice ...


2

To retain that effect of a climax - no. Of course other notes are available - the next lower harmony will sound in tune, but it's the original notes' relative position in the song that makes them sound like that. With a smaller tessitura (voice range), the better option is to change the key of the whole song, so that those top notes sound as good as they can ...


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Yawning while singing is not necessarily a sign of improper breathing. Rather, it could be a sign of good throat position. Proper vocal technique across a wide variety of styles (including classical, folk, and pop, all of which I'm trained in) has a singer open their throat and raise their palate in the rear, similar to the motion you make while yawning. ...


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Warmups, among other things, help increase the flexibility of your vocal cords. Singing too quietly won't properly warm them up, and singing too loudly can damage them. Your instinct to start a bit quieter and gradually increase the volume is probably a good one - it mimics any other kind of physical stretch. That said, you should seldom be belting in a ...


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Not being completely sure what you are asking - I will answer the question as if you are writing a melody for a song based on a pre-determined chord progression. If you were to approach writing a melody by first defining a chord progression, you would probably want to start with chords that fit within the key you decide your song should be in. So let's ...


1

If you already have the song, the notes are already there to be sung. If you only sang a C note with a C chord etc, it would be a poor song. A C chord will work with several notes from the C scale. The best are C, E and G, as they actually make up that chord. Depending where in the bar you sing other notes over it, others may or may not fit. Your ear will ...


3

To put it simply, in a song, there's melody and there's chords. They do have some relation (certain notes do not sound good with certain chords, to various degrees) but they are two separate things. In order to play the guitar you sould know the chords (you already have that), in order to sing the melody you should find the notes sequence that consist it. ...


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This is just from 2 years of class voice at the uni, so if there is anyone better qualified to answer, take their answer over mine. The different warm ups do different things. Most warmups stretch range, and you certianly don't want to belt at the end of those, because you're already at the top (or bottom) of your range, and belting at the edges of your ...


-1

Singing scales from your diaphragm.


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Our voices are lower in the morning because the vocal cords and the subtle musculature which surrounds our larynx are in a state of relaxation from resting the voice overnight. In my case I used to sing professionally as a bass in a nine a.m. choir then as a tenor, my legitimate range, at the 11:00 service. In order to have the bass notes for the 9:00 ...


1

Just keep doing the exercises. At least you then have the proper reflexes and control and vocal cord resilience for the time when the depth is there. Which may eventually lower the barrier when it isn't readily.



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