Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

The teacher should known, especially is she is "brilliant" (I interpret as "successful and experienced"). Ask her and if you see or hear any doubts immediately, or after the first lesson, do not insist. This may depend on the vocal ranges of both student and teacher. Men and women have different voice types but the ranges may overlap.


1

Singing harmony is just a skill. It can certainly be learned, like any other skill. You didn't specify what type of context you're planning on singing harmony in (a choir? a home studio? a band? just driving around in the car?), nor what your current level of musical knowledge/experience is (Do you play any instruments? Can you read music? Do you know any ...


0

Irrespective of singing, a portamento indicates that specific notes (whether specified or not) should be played or performed. For example, if there is a perfect-fifth leap with a port. indication, the performer should play/sing all of the chromatic notes in between unless otherwise indicated. A glissando indicates that no specific pitches are necessary ...


5

Although the two terms are often conflated, and although there are plenty of situations where the difference isn't noticeable, the intended difference is that portamento is a relatively quick pitch slide between all or most of the notes during a melody or melody section. The pitch slide tends to come only at the very end of the note, more or less during the ...


0

Apart from having to sing an octave (or two) out, it's not going to cause problems. Voice production and projection are the same for each sex. The choice of key may cause slight problems, depending on the two tessituras, but a good teacher will cope easily with that. The head of music in the city I used to work always sung in falsetto when teaching junior ...


1

Will a brilliant grown-up baseball trainer be able to figure out and help a struggling kid student just as efficient as a 10-year old baseball trainer could? Sounds a bit absurd, doesn't it? The teaching skills and knowledge and adaptability are way more important than bodily similarities of teacher and student. You won't find student and teacher with ...


2

As with most of the questions on this site, the answer is practice. Do lots of singing in harmony, and it will become second-nature. But how do you get started? Learn a song's harmony part by rote, and sing that alongside someone else singing the melody (or a recording of yourself). The simplest harmony part is a third harmony -- that is, whatever the ...


0

One key concept in singing harmony is knowing what chord you're singing. You can't always just sing a third or a fifth. For example, if the melody note is an E and you want to sing one chord tone below that, the note you sing could be: C# (minor third) if the chord is an A major or C# minor C (major third) if the chord is a C major or A minor B (fourth) if ...


0

Sing arpeggios for common chords and recognize the third and fifth to begin with. Listen to the end of Twist and Shout from the Beatles and you will hear how harmony works. Each voice comes in right after each other building the chord. ...


2

High is for sopranos and tenors (in their respective octaves) and Low is for altos and basses (in their respective octaves). This is the convention used for song books in all genres of music all over the world.


3

Repeating the cantus firmus (c.f.) would not have been wrong at all, and it is done a lot. However, there are other options of course: You just play the harmony, i.e., the keyboard plays moreorless only large choords in some proper way, by both hands. The right hand plays another melody that you think out. There are several possibilities: You can play a ...


1

Bulgarian vocal music, like that of many Eastern European countries, is charactarized by a very different vocalization technique than what we in "Western" countries are used to. The Western tradition of classical singing is closely tied to the Italian "bel canto" school of singing, which is all about achieving a much more tall and vertical resonant space in ...


2

As far as I can tell she is using an open voiced technique or at least something similar to it. This being said I am not an expert in Bulgarian singing so I did a little research to confirm my above suspicion. This article/interview confirms that suspicion. Not that one source ever proves something. However, after watching the interview I am pretty ...


0

I just had to respond to a couple of points on here as absolute nonsense, and this is by no way intended to be an attack on the posters here but moreover what they have been taught or led to believe. I will give you one example: "I arrived at music school I intended to study jazz and pop singing, but a jazz vocal professor at my school took me aside and ...


0

I am not a voice teacher, however I do know it is not very often for a voice type to deviate by much. From what you describe, it sounds like you are likely a baritono lirico(lyric baritone) or tenore robusto(dramatic tenor). One way you may determine your passaggi(every singer has two) is to sing one note at a time, first playing the note on a piano, then ...


0

As long as you are singing in time with what you heard coming out of your speakers/headphones, it doesn't matter if the resulting recording puts these tracks out of sync. It's entirely normal - you just shift the start of tracks as necessary to align them, which should be pretty trivial; I had to do this when recording separate piano parts for a dozen ...


3

You are hearing the device's latency - the amount of time it takes to process the signal in & again out of the computer. You can reduce the latency, depending on DAW software, by reducing the buffer size used for the interface - but this is at a cost of increased processing power required. The usual solution is simply to not listen to the throughput ...


4

Try recording either the output of monitor speakers along with your singing, or at least rerecording the signal you are getting on your headphones on a separate track with your singing. Is your singing off-time with regard to the rerecorded track? If so, it is your singing. If it isn't, then you are having latency. Figure out whether your soundcard ...


2

This style of singing is known as singing with an aspirate tone. It is desirable in pop music for many reasons that are not necessary to list here. You can create this sound by not moving an adequate amount of air through your vocal cords; the result of improper vocal resonance and escaping air produces the aspirate (raspy, airy, wispy) sound you find ...


1

Although I'm a big fan of Android for most purposes, Android is not really there when it comes to applications for live music performance. The Android music apps that do exist suffer from latency problems. I believe these are caused by a combination of the Android OS not having music as a design goal, and of the broad range of hardware platforms it runs on. ...


2

iOS is far more well supplied by music-related apps than Android. I've heard there are reasons in terms of how audio hardware is done but that may not be true - it might just be that because Apple is known for being used in creative areas, this drives the market. Either way, you can get some amazing software that will work on even a previous-generation iPad ...


4

"Countertenor" is not a well-defined term. It was sort of coined by Alfred Deller, having a more masculine flair than "male alto" (originally just "alto" as differentiated from the female "contralto"). Deller's beard also served to stress the "male" character of the singer. Male altos at the time were quite established in English choiral singing but not ...


0

While some tablets and mobile phones may be loud enough to hear without headphones, they are still rather silent. Of course, if you can connect an external amplifier this is no longer a problem. Most of smartphones in these times are capable of replaying a pre-recorder sound track without much additional software. You could use your desktop workstation to ...


1

hitting the written notes is different than singing in pitch. In pitch means you are not slightly flat or slightly sharp. This is pretty easy to hear when you have a decent musical ear (ie you are not tone-deaf.) Most of the public can tell when someone is singing on pitch or not, cuz if they aren't, it sounds "off-key" (sour). As for the other thing, ...


5

In Western music, based a 12 note chromatic scale, there are fixed frequencies that are named notes. Picking an octave at random, and using A4 = 440 Hz as a reference, here are some frequencies in Hz (that is, oscillations per second) C4 261.63 C#4 277.18 D4 293.66 D#4 311.13 E4 329.63 F4 349.23 F#4 369.99 G4 392.00 G#4 415.30 A4 440.00 ...


2

Well, there are only 12 correct pitches per octave. If you are not on pitch, you are more likely than not somewhere else. Imagine a target range with 30 equally-spaced popup rods you have to hit as they go up randomly. Afterwards the judge, not knowing which rods went up and when, gets to tell you how good your aim is. He'll be able to tell you if you ...


1

It is possible that some few people in this world are tone deaf and can not achieve this for various reasons either ear and or brain related. For the rest of us it is achieved through one of two skills, tone comparison and perfect pitch. Imagine the music in a horror movie (a great example is the shower scene from psycho). Hearing even the slightest ...


0

The easiest way to check if someone is in pitch is to play on a keyboard the vocal line from the sheet music along with the vocalist and record both you and the vocalist. You may need to adjust what you play to fit the notes that the singer is attempting to hit. Then listen to the recording. Any place where the played note and the sung note sound ugly is ...


1

Well, sing a soft song only intended to be heard by one person. Problem is, you are at a party with a din and she is behind three doors. So you want to be heard over the noise without raising your voice, and it still needs to be pleasant rather than some screamed thing. It's a throat/mouth/tongue shape thing that needs adjustment dependent on pitch and ...


3

I agree with Tim, although playing around with the resonance can definitely be fun! Vocal resonance is the result of the shaping of the throat and mouth, something known as the first and second formant tunings (but I wouldn't worry about the terms just yet). In order to find great resonance you must be able to freely adjust the vowel sounds created by your ...


2

Acoustic guitars have approximately the same range as male vocals. So the notes that it 'heard' were within the sound range it was produced to amplify and project.Had it been an acoustic bass, for example, the resonance would have been less. Bathrooms have a similar property, but usually have a particular frequency that gets amplified. On the guitar, there ...


2

Only the more expensive studio condensers and some live performance mics have good built in pop filters. Some vocalists don't have a big problems with plosives, but others like myself do. The built in pop filter on the SM58 is hardly sufficient - you can cut a piece of carbon fiber (about the size of a silver dollar), unscrew the mic grill - and push it up ...


1

It is easy to forget that your vocal chords are muscles. They need warming up and cooling down just like any other muscle in your body if you want to progress and prevent injuries. If you find you have little endurance singing, a warm up might make the difference between shooting your voice out early and being able to sing for much longer periods. This can ...


3

The biggest thing is simply practice and experience: the more you do it, the easier it gets. It doesn't help so much for the present, but it means that if you do this again next year, it will be easier. But here are a few tricks for this year. Highlight your part. That way, it stands out from the others, so it takes less concentration to find it when you ...


0

The same way people read piano scores that have 2 clefs that are being played at the same time: You practice and practice and you'll get there. At first, it is hard for everyone to follow two different things simultaneously (in your case, a bass line and lyrics), but if you keep doing it, you'll be able to follow both the lyrics and the music without ...


1

Usually with SATB the lyrics are just under the dots.That's because the same words may not always be sung at the same time in each voice. Learning the lyrics as in a poem means there is one fewer thing to look at - then the notes can be followed more easily. If you can find recordings of the pieces, them listen to them while following the sheet ...


2

It is called Scat singing. Per Wikipedia: In vocal jazz, scat singing is vocal improvisation with wordless vocables, nonsense syllables or without words at all. It is pretty common in Jazz. Singers used it to 'solo' (cause they had no instrument).The song you provided is jazzy so I think scat singing is the correct term here. Here are a few examples: ...


0

I haven't had a chance to watch the second video yet, but in the first, it sounds to me like maybe a mixture of falsetto and non-falsetto (modal) voice. A full-on falsetto usually has a more "Mickey Mouse" quality to it. I think this also might have a more nasal resonance to it. Granted, I don't know much about technical vocal terminology. But you mention ...


3

This is a pretty broad question, but in general I think a score is going to be preferred over a lead sheet in almost all situations. In particular, a well-arranged piano score and NOT a PC score most of the time, as many PC scores try to jam in as much information about the orchestration and are extremely difficult to sight read. The reason is that, short ...


0

Yes you can get drum machines for ipad, and sampling tools for microphone. One example would be Native Instruments "iMaschine". I use it on my iPhone all the time. It has drum pads, record vocal samples, keys, EQ, FX, volume sliders, etc. You can even cut the sound samples to size. I then export the beats to my full version on my computer if I want, (but ...


1

To me both sound like falsetto used to great effect in combination with microphone technique. In the lower range, both use a breathy kind of falsetto with incomplete closure (which is what most people occasionally using falsetto end up with). That's good for a "husky female" variant. In their higher range, they use reinforced falsetto (with good closure, ...


3

The simple answer is - none. There have been many bits of software over the years claiming to be able to do it, but frankly, unless the vocal is clean, dead-centre & has no effects on it, you're not going to really get anywhere at all. The purported method is to split the stereo track, then phase-invert one side; which sounds horrible & only ...


1

Perfectly valid in modern styles too. As user15575 mentioned, Prince & Michael Jackson were famous exponents of it. I recall this example from the 80's - though not as polished as some of the more famous examples, the singer in this (Jimmy Somerville) stays in falsetto for the entirety of the song, even down to his lowest notes. ...


0

When Lighting Strikes (Klaus Nomi). Obviously, when it fits. If you are not sure in choral or solo settings, it may make sense to make a good quality recording and crosscheck: since falsetto and chest voice have a different configuration of the voice box, they sound more different to the singer than to the audience. In a group of tenors, a cultivated ...


3

Sure. I think the majority of countertenors employ falsetto for considerable parts of their range. Check out Ombra mai fu in the version of Jochen Kowalski, a countertenor mainly employing falsetto. That's certainly a valid/serious singing style. His hallmark role indeed is "Prinz Orlofsky" from the operette "Die Fledermaus" which is a comical role, and ...



Top 50 recent answers are included