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0

If you want to continue enjoying singing until you're 60 (or more), I wouldn't do it. Maybe some people can keep going that way -- but not everyone can. Why risk it?


3

It sounds like Kelsey Grammer's falsetto was aiming for that high A4 but landed instead on the Bb above it. He quickly corrects himself of it, though, by shifting down to the intended A.


1

I'm not sure we can tell. The maximum vocal range is partly determined by genetics. And though 2 octaves is pretty impressive it still doesn't tell us how much more there is to explore in your voice. One possibility is that you're still far from your boundaries. In this case a professional teacher can help you radically increase your range in a few years. ...


1

Sounds like you have a pretty big range already. You may have a few more high notes available (or ways of integrating your falsetto range, appropriate to some styles of singing). "Baritone" is about quality of voice as well as range. Do you see entension of range as the primary purpose of taking singing lessons?


0

It sounds like your nerves are causing something to tense up and close off, preventing free vibration from taking place. Even though you don't have Tourette Syndrome (I assume), you could take a page from Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics (CBIT). The basic idea is to find a competing response that does not allow the undesirable movement or ...


0

Others have answered really well here (Dr Mayhem's gets my vote) but given the root of the problem seems to be nerves, here's what helped me out: 1) I read someting Keith Richards wrote: "Look the crowd dead in the eye. If you get hurt, you get hurt." The sheer bravery of that reminded me that no-one is going to end up in pieces. So what if you miss a note? ...


0

There's two parts to your question: (1) "Where does my passaggio end?" and (2) "What's going on when I sing up to E5 like this?" (1) Unfortunately, there's a lot of disagreement in the terminology and classification of the vocal registers, especially in the male voice. Some vocalists don't even really consider passaggio to be a real thing, since your vocal ...


2

I think the technique is best described as a yodel, which is defined as a quick flipping between vocal registers. A yodel isn't specific to the release of a note, but is the closest thing to a proper term for the general technique. If you're trying to describe the style for a someone, "like a yodel" might be clearer, since most people associate yodeling ...


1

I'm jumping right into products, sorry in advance. These are some of the best around, but there are others in each product category that would do the same thing. There are in fact programs that will do exactly what you're asking, but they aren't inexpensive. Steinberg's Cubase, a digital audio workstation, will record a mono track of your voice through a ...


-1

So anyway I came across this software after failing to get useful answers here: http://scorecloud.com/ I've had fairly poor results with it so far to be honest but that may be limitations of my technique. Someone else might find this useful so I'm sharing it... it'd be interesting to hear if trained singers get better accuracy than I do (post a comment if ...


0

However much money you are prepared to spend, the best - probably the only - computer for doing this is the wet one sitting between your ears, plus your musical skills and experience.


0

No direct experience, but based on what I heard from others, it's a risky procedure with unpredictable results. There are probably also more than one type of operation, it depends on the conditions and the experience of the doctors. I knew one singer who went for surgery, but only because the alternative was to stop singing. He was able to sing again after ...


0

I do similar length gigs sometimes. I sing in a rock band and we like to party 'til late so sometimes this involves a 4 or 5 hour gig. Not all that often but sometimes. I have found this works.. Enhance Vocal Endurance: I'm no vocal trainer but I have learnt some thigns from this site. Eg I used to try to sing high notes with chest voice, pushing harder ...


3

Here are a few thoughts: If you don't already, you definitely need to develop a vocal warm-up / cool-down routine. You wouldn't run for four hours without stretching, would you? Why then would you sing? I don't have time / space here to suggest specific exercises, but I'll say you should definitely start researching. A good exercise works from the back ...


1

Besides sleep and hydration, which are key, you should warm up and cool down. Also, like any endurance activity, you have to train up to it at a measured pace and there will always be a limit to how long you can go. If you are hoarse all the next day you are probably hurting your voice, and that damage can be permanent or semi-permanent. If you get nodules ...


0

You should start by making sure what your range is ie the notes you can comfortably sing. Baritones also have 'deep' voices make sure you are certain of what type of singer you are exactly. When you have done this the fun part begins. You can start of by just singing along with the piano. No words just try to match the sound the piano makes (Be certain the ...


1

Tim's answer coveres the vocal straining / hearinign yourself issue, but other factors I have noticed myself : Are the band in tune? The vocalist doen'st stand a chnace if someone is out of tune with the rest. Which note should he/she settle on ? Which instruments are too loud ? My band has been using a new bassist for the last year as our usual guy got ...


1

We don't know the program--you'll need to talk to someone there to find out what exactly the prerequisites are. Usually this is the kind of question that the teacher for the course you're going to take would be happy to answer. In general for introductory theory courses they won't care at all about the quality of your voice, only that you can produce ...


0

I had the same problem. Notice I said had. Your issue is one of technique. Best advice is what others have said here which is to get a singing instructor. I recommend a male just because imitation is so critical to the journey of singing better, and it is easier for you to imitate a male than a female voice obviously. You can also look at Singing ...


1

I think it always depends on the practice of the singer. Correct! Vocal cord needs to be hydrated and well loosed and drinking cold water contracts the muscles. But there is always an exemptions to the rules and as for me and my practice, drinking cold water helps me and my throat relax especially when performing. I've been singing since i was 5 and now ...


0

Technically I don't know if they're three separate "voices"; perhaps it's better to say they "feel" like three different things. I think your ranges are a little off too. I'm a trained singer and my range currently is: Chest: around C3 -> F5 "Mid": E5 -> G#5 Head: A5 and up to at least D6 Most men have a range that's basically similar, once the proper ...


0

It's hard to put the condenser studio microphone (with stand) on a practical place. If you have a acoustic piano, the best option is a dynamic microphone because the condenser microphone also picks up the sound of the piano.


0

The word that I have heard used for this technique is "covering," as in "he shifted to a more covered tone for that high note." As Greg noted, it involves manipulating the resonance chambers of the throat to change the formant structure of the vocal tone.


0

I'm not familiar with any specific name that technique has, and, really, it's a rather subtle thing that I wouldn't call a distinct technique in itself. You may hear this variously described as having a "darker" tone, or sometimes as being "throatier". What these singers are doing is opening up the back of the throat more (lifting their soft palate and ...



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