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I've been researching for years. I've been trying different teachers, books, forums, etc... The only real help I got came from Brett Manning's cd lessons. I am not affilated at all and I can say that he allowed my voice to do things impossible for me before. Just one last thing: without a (great) teacher you're taking more than twice the time you need to ...


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There are already some good answers on how to learn technique, and just getting out there and singing. I wanted to give some ideas as to how to listen to yourself outside your head. One method to listen to yourself is to use an audio recorder. The average phone will be adequate, although if you have higher quality equipment, it might be better. But speed ...


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There's quite an interesting change that happens in your voice when you're healthy. In men, it causes the voice to deepen and become more sonorous, and men with deep voices are perceived to be more attractive and healthy to the opposite sex. Your better vocals post workout are likely down to an increased lung capacity, and better blood flow. I'm tempted ...


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The unfortunate thing about singing is that you can do your voice and yourself damage if your technique is wrong or you over exert yourself. It's for this reason that I would say getting personal feedback is a top priority; however this doesn't mean you need to shell out hundreds on a face to face teacher. you can: Join some singing forums Sign up to ...


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My suggestion would be to work on singing from your center - using your diaphragm. While it will be nice to hone the edge of the tool (fine-tuning the pitch of your voice), you must first shape the tool into its form. Once you are able to effectively sing from your center, I think you will find that your range will be defined by how you sing when you are ...


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Short answer is yes, it comes with practice. But for the best results, you need to focus your practice on your goal, rather than just singing songs, and hoping to improve. Play a single note. This can be on a keyboard, a guitar, pitch pipes, or whatever other instrument you have, including a keyboard app for your phone. Instead of singing immediately, take ...


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The fixed doh system as used in France, as one example, can quickly become more of a hindrance than a help. If a tune is in , say, Eb, then doh automatically isn't the root key note (tonic); that will be called Me flat. One of the helpful bits to a movable doh is the lack of sharps and flats - usually, in simpler tunes at least. Thus, the whole ensemble ...


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Can 'do' be any pitch one wishes?, i.e. does this mean everybody chooses their own key to sing in, transposing the music while singing? A movable 'do' can indeed be any pitch, however, in a group setting, the entire group must use the same any pitch. Otherwise, you get unintended multitonality, and chaos! If needed, the group's leader could pick a pitch ...


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Movable Do is called such because it is just that: movable. Movable Do focuses on intervallic relationships. When you change keys, "Do" becomes the new tonal center for that key and all of the other solfege syllables are transposed accordingly. For example, in the key of D, "D" would be "Do". If we changed keys to "F", "F" would now be "Do." Fixed Do ...


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Sounds like you have goals you'd like to meet, but art in general, including singing, is utterly subjective so as to whether you're meeting them or not is really up to you. I guess there are a few technical things which are easy to 'yae/nae', but with caveats: Are you singing in tune ? You can probably decide this for yourself but a second/third opinion ...


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To be honest, I think you're on the wrong track. I don't believe that there can be a universal and objective tool that does what you want. What you need is an experienced teacher / vocal coach who will listen to the way you sing, the way you breathe, and who can tell you what you should focus on and which techniques and exercises should be used to achieve ...


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Obviously being able to hit the right note is key, but you won't need to look at a spectrum analyser for that. Timbre us a much more complex question. There are successful singers with many different types of voice, so again, looking at the spectrum is unlikely to help you. You are best served by visiting a voice coach and getting them to instruct you on ...



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