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7h
comment Why the octave number changes between B and C?
Maybe so, but what of it? The system of notation (and church organ keyboards) started with "A" and the Aeolian mode, but eventually "C" and the Ionian mode won out as the most popular starting note and mode. Maybe the Dorian mode was quite popular at some point in the middle, but clearly our system of notating octaves is not based on "D".
14h
comment Can a symphony be in many keys?
@DarrelHoffman, I disagree strenuously. The questioner wants to learn about actual symphonies, not other kinds of music that the public might misunderstand to be a symphony. To be sure, categorizing things in databases is about adhering to clearly defined and proper nomenclature and definitions of terms. Furthermore Richard Ashcroft, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards are perfectly clear on the concept that their song "Bitter Sweet Symphony" is, in fact, a song. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitter_Sweet_Symphony
14h
comment Can a symphony be in many keys?
@KyleStrand, if you ask the question "Can a symphony have more than one key", the answer is, "Yes, and this structure of more than one key is explained in the concept of sonata form". Understanding sonata form is useful to understanding the answer to the question.
14h
comment Can a symphony be in many keys?
@KyleStrand, sonata form defines the usual structure for using multiple different keys in different sections of one movement of a symphony.
14h
comment Can a symphony be in many keys?
@DarrelHoffman, "Bittersweet Symphony" is the title of a song. It is certainly not a symphony in any sense. A symphony is a long-form multi-movement musical composition with specific sections that move through different key relationships and musical structures in a certain defined structure (although the specifics of this structure have evolved over the centuries). I've provided a link to one article on the structure of the symphony in my answer. A song is something altogether different.
2d
comment Is there a name for the sound of a performer physically interacting with their instrument?
We usually specify by naming the part of the instrument that makes the noise. With a piano, it's "hammer noise" or "pedal noise". With a saxophone it's "key noise". With a guitar it's "finger squeak" or "pick noise". On a pipe organ it's "valve noise". Etc.
2d
comment Is there a name for the sound of a performer physically interacting with their instrument?
@Tim, I have no idea how that happened. I need to get out of the house more and spend less time in front of my computer.
Feb
6
comment Is this a tie or a slur or something else?
If you experience a monster hemiola, seek medical attention immediately. Otherwise it may advance to a strangulated hemiola, and the curtain will fall on you before the fat lady sings.
Feb
5
comment Is this a tie or a slur or something else?
You are correct. It is either a tie, or a slur, or something else.
Feb
3
comment How is it that 12 eighth notes fit in a measure labeled as common time?
@KJPrice, I don't think that "simple" and "Liszt" can exist in the same sentence. Neither can "simple" and "Chopin". I'm not a pianist but I'm sure there are other Romantic-era composers that would be an easier place to start.
Feb
3
comment How is it that 12 eighth notes fit in a measure labeled as common time?
@LaurencePayne, I agree. The original is how Franz Liszt or his publisher wanted it to appear. I created my version only to analyze it -- to show the triplets clearly to demonstrate how to count the subdivisions of the beat. That is all.
Feb
3
comment What is a D/A Chord?
@RockinCowboy, that was a "typo" on my part. I'll correct it.
Feb
3
comment Why is the guitar tuned like it is?
Actually you can easily do both with one guitar. Going from "straight fourths" to "standard" only involves re-tuning two strings by a half-step. It only takes a couple of seconds. That's what I do.
Feb
1
comment Why does rock music use higher fret alternatives on guitar?
Classical guitars in general only have access to the first 12 frets. A classical guitar with a cutaway for access to the higher frets (as on an electric guitar) is a recent innovation. Consequently classical music for guitar tends to be composed and arranged with only 12 frets in mind.
Jan
31
comment There is something common in these but what?
I would say that these are all contemporary pieces heavily patterned after Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata (1801). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piano_Sonata_No._14_(Beethoven)
Jan
31
comment There is something common in these but what?
@chx, are you a pianist? On this site we help music students learn to play their instruments. If you are asking more as a music fan, and not as someone who wants to learn to play these kinds of pieces on the piano, we have another site for that: StackExchange Music Fans. Perhaps this question should be migrated to that site instead? musicfans.stackexchange.com
Jan
31
comment Why does rock music use higher fret alternatives on guitar?
This is hardly confined to rock music. In most styles of music, guitarists make use of all the frets accessible on the fingerboard of their instrument. Why would they not?
Jan
31
comment Piano vs Guitar Strings? Tension vs length?
@dwoz, I was not attempting to provide a comprehensive answer to the original question. I was trying to add supplimental information to the other answers already given here (which I upvoted) by discussing an aspect of the issue that nobody else had thought of. Sometimes it takes more than one answer on this site to cover the entire question, and various people who make their own contribution.
Jan
30
comment Yellow submarine sounds slightly off-tune
The link you have provided is of a cover band doing their own version of the Beatles song. If this cover band is out of tune or not, I do not much care.
Jan
30
comment Why evil themes are prevailing in heavy metal?
I don't know how to migrate a question to another stack. This would be a better fit for the "Music Fans" site.