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Feb
14
comment How to play a long sustained note on an electric guitar?
Yes, that was true back in the day with Bowie, but Fripp has had a Sustainer in every guitar that he has played for the last twenty years or more, and it is featured on the many albums he has recorded in that time.
Feb
14
comment Text above a stave in Sibelius sheet music. What does it mean? (~C 1, 64)
In Sibelius, whether it shows up in the score depends on whether the user enables the display of hidden commands or not. You can turn it on or off.
Feb
14
comment Writing a Mozart-style cadenza
In Mozart's time and before, solo classical musicians were expected to be able to improvise, not unlike jazz musicians in the modern era. Improvisation was something that was taught to young musicians in Mozart's time. Over subsequent generations, this fell out of fashion, for performers and for the expectations of the composers themselves. In the present day, it seems that many classical musicians are re-discovering improvisation (in a historically-appropriate, limited sense) through the early music movement, or what we call "historically-informed performance practice".
Feb
13
comment Improvisers notable for their alternate stylistic approaches
This is an extremely, extremely broad question. It would be more useful if you could restrict it to improvisers on a certain musical instrument, in a certain genre or style of music.
Feb
12
comment Writing a Mozart-style cadenza
Thank you, @jjmusicnotes. I know a good deal about historically-informed performance in the Baroque and classical periods, but I am a singer, and I know nothing about how to play brass instruments!
Feb
12
comment What Type Of Acoustic Guitar Is This? And Is It Worth Buying?
Yamaha guitars start at around $200 but some models cost several thousand dollars, and everywhere in between. Yamaha is the largest musical instrument manufacturer in the world, by a wide margin.
Feb
12
comment What Type Of Acoustic Guitar Is This? And Is It Worth Buying?
Have you ever bought a guitar before? If this is your first time buying a guitar, you may not feel knowledgeable enough to buy an unknown model. You might be better off buying an inexpensive new guitar from a reputable dealer.
Feb
12
comment What Type Of Acoustic Guitar Is This? And Is It Worth Buying?
Has it ever been professionally serviced by a guitar repair technician?
Feb
12
comment What Type Of Acoustic Guitar Is This? And Is It Worth Buying?
How long has he owned the guitar? What year was it made?
Feb
12
comment What Type Of Acoustic Guitar Is This? And Is It Worth Buying?
What type of a case is he offering, specifically?
Feb
12
comment What Type Of Acoustic Guitar Is This? And Is It Worth Buying?
On the back of the headstock, is there a sticker indicating the country in which it is made?
Feb
12
comment What Type Of Acoustic Guitar Is This? And Is It Worth Buying?
Is there a paper label inside the soundhole that indicates the model number? It would be very helpful in identifying its value.
Feb
11
comment What do these numbers at the start of the music score mean
They mean that the tempo is 107 beats per minute, and the time signature is 6/8. However, there is an obvious error in your example. It shows in the metronome mark that a quarter note equals 107 beats per minute. It should say that a dotted quarter note equals 107 beats per minute, as this would be in keeping with the time signature.
Feb
11
comment In blues, country blues, why don't songwriters get sued for aping the same progressions/tempos/scales as other established blues songs?
Yes, @MarcksThomas, you are correct. But when a composer registers a copyright, it does not mean that a court has judged that the piece is unique. It just means that there has been a record that a piece has been registered for a copyright. It still all comes down to the plaintiff's ability to convince a judge and a courtroom that he holds a copyright that has been infringed upon by a defendant. And generally, at least in the United States of America, where I live, a chord progression in the absence of a melody does not hold up in court as grounds for infringement.
Feb
11
comment In blues, country blues, why don't songwriters get sued for aping the same progressions/tempos/scales as other established blues songs?
Any time you make a substantially new arrangement or version of a traditional song in the public domain, you can copyright your new version. That is permissable under international copyright law.
Feb
11
comment In blues, country blues, why don't songwriters get sued for aping the same progressions/tempos/scales as other established blues songs?
Who exactly would have legal standing to sue someone over such an infringement? If you bring a lawsuit, the judge asks you to prove that you have standing to sue, meaning that you own something that somebody else is stealing. Nowhere does "the law" prosecute someone for plagiarism or copyright infringement. The party who owns something has to bring a lawsuit against someone that they allege is stealing something from them. Nobody would have legal standing for the kind of lawsuit you are envisioning.
Feb
10
comment In blues, country blues, why don't songwriters get sued for aping the same progressions/tempos/scales as other established blues songs?
I'm also a little puzzled by your comment about "commodification that was not present in earlier societies". The reality is the opposite. For centuries, composers have always "borrowed" material from other composers. However, it is only in the most recent 100 years or so that there has been a legal framework for copyrighting of music that enabled people to sue for damages for infringement, and only in the last 100 years or so that there has been a concept called "in the public domain" for songs.
Feb
10
comment In blues, country blues, why don't songwriters get sued for aping the same progressions/tempos/scales as other established blues songs?
But I should point out that we don't use your term of "legal plagiarism". We call it "adapting something that is in the public domain". It is not considered plagiarism if everyone knows what the source is, and no copyright is being violated. This is a legitimate technique in songwriting and music composition.
Feb
10
comment In blues, country blues, why don't songwriters get sued for aping the same progressions/tempos/scales as other established blues songs?
Basically anything written before about 1920, anywhere in the world, is in the public domain and can be freely adapted into new compositions. This is an important concept.
Feb
10
comment In blues, country blues, why don't songwriters get sued for aping the same progressions/tempos/scales as other established blues songs?
Yes, certainly. "Legal" plagiarism involves copying something from a song that is in the public domain, meaning that it is so old that it cannot be copyrighted, or if it once had a copyright, said copyright has expired. Songwriters and composers do this all the time, and it is legitimate.