Reputation
27,403
Next tag badge:
121/100 score
19/20 answers
Badges
2 49 115
Newest
 terminology
Impact
~1.6m people reached

Jan
29
comment Did baroque composers think of ritardando on their compositions?
Some harpsichords had two manuals and adjustable stops where you could choose two dynamic levels -- loud (two choirs of strings coupled) or soft (one choir). One or the other and nothing inbetween. But that hardly has anything to do with how to play a modern piano. It's hard to make a comparison. Furthermore the way that composers for harpsichord achieved dynamic coloring was to write out more or less notes into each chord, so if you are playing that piece on a modern piano, it's already written in for you. It's all quite complex, isn't it?
Jan
29
comment Did baroque composers think of ritardando on their compositions?
Excellent points, @TangledUpInBlue. Most Baroque music is based on dance rhythms, and understanding each different dance form tells you a lot about how to play each phrase. And I had forgotten about unmeasured preludes, which were more common in early French Baroque keyboard music -- Couperin and Jacquet de la Guerre.
Jan
29
comment Did baroque composers think of ritardando on their compositions?
Although -- the swell box on a pipe organ was an innovation that appeared during the 1700s, so it could figure into the late Baroque to create a kind of crescendo effect on a pipe organ. But I'm not out to write a massive treatise here; I'm trying to restrict myself to things relevant to a young modern piano player trying to understand how to play their instrument.
Jan
29
comment Did baroque composers think of ritardando on their compositions?
@BobRodes, I know about the clavichord, but I chose not to mention it because there aren't that many pieces for it and they are rarely performed by modern pianists. My answers are overlong anyway. However, although this is little-known, the crescendo was described in the literature for Baroque ensembles such as the string orchestra; it's just that it wasn't practical on any kind of keyboard during that era.
Jan
29
comment Garage Band: how to have a drummer play only a steady snare drum on all the eighth notes?
You can also find a number of books for sale that are beginners' guides to working with GarageBand. Here are some. amazon.com/s/…
Jan
29
comment Garage Band: how to have a drummer play only a steady snare drum on all the eighth notes?
If your basic understanding of GarageBand is so limited, you should read the owners' manual. It's found here. help.apple.com/garageband/mac/10.1
Jan
28
comment Does a chord imply a change in the key signature?
Kinda funny song title. "Cold Duck" refers to a brand of cheap sparkling wine (faux champagne) made in Canada that was popular in the 1960s and 1970s.
Jan
28
comment Does a chord imply a change in the key signature?
In one style of jazz lead sheet writing, no key signature is used at all even though the melody line and the chord progressions clearly indicate one or more different keys. In this style of lead sheet notation, lots of accidentals are put in front of notes as needed, rather than having the accidentals notated in a key signature.
Jan
28
comment Does a chord imply a change in the key signature?
In general, regardless of your example, no one chord by itself implies a change in key. It requires a progression of chords creating a cadence to create a change in key. In general, jazz involves frequent very brief excursions into chords that are outside the given key or that contain notes outside the given key, but these are so frequent and brief that they do not necessarily constitute a key change. Furthermore most jazz lead sheets are notated with a single key signature even though the piece clearly moves into one or more different keys at certain points.
Jan
26
comment Do capable harmony singers sing in just intonation or tempered tuning?
@RockinCowboy, I passed that very same audition for that very same group myself, in 1978.
Jan
26
comment Do capable harmony singers sing in just intonation or tempered tuning?
What a good singer does with regard to intonation varies with the contexts of different pieces of music that are being sung. A good singer can choose between just intonation and 12-tone equal temperament at will. The singers in an a cappella choir can choose to exist in the isolation of just intonation, and in the same concert they can sing accompanied by a piano and shift gears into 12-tone equal temperament.
Jan
26
comment Do capable harmony singers sing in just intonation or tempered tuning?
@SimonWhite, as a lifetime semi-professional choral singer and vocal soloist with a university degree in singing, I disagree with your premise. All singing can be infinitely microtonal in nature. Good singers can control microtonality well, and poor singers cannot.
Jan
26
comment How to automatically create guitar chord diagrams for site?
Why not contact the people who run Ultimate-Guitar.com and ask them about their technology and propose to them that you license its use from them for a fee.
Jan
24
comment How to reduce tape hiss while recording a cassette tape with digital data as source
Trying to remove the noise and hiss after the fact with Audacity or another DAW is not the best method. The best method is to prevent the hiss and noise from happening in the first place at the moment of recording, and when you play back the analog recording and capture it in the digital domain -- the latter being where you need a professional external analog-to-digital interface for your PC.
Jan
24
comment How to reduce tape hiss while recording a cassette tape with digital data as source
I agree with Todd Wilcox. Using the "line in" or "line out" on your PC is where most of your noise is coming from, not from the analog tape. You need an external professional-quality stereo analog-to-digital converter that connects to your PC through USB ro some other digital connection (Thunderbolt, FireWire). But first, you should be recording on a cassette tape deck with Dolby noise reduction encoding and decoding. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolby_noise-reduction_system
Jan
22
comment Reaper GUI dissapearing
I am certain that Reaper has a user discussion forum. You should post your question there because it is full of Reaper experts. There are not many people who use Reaper on this site.
Jan
22
comment Bad back… is it better for me to play with lumbar support?
If you have a bad back, don't play in bed. You are slumping all the time. Either play standing up, with the piano keyboard surface elevated to elbow height, or play sitting up straight on a bench, again with the keyboard surface at elbow height. If you have been treated for scoliosis, then go back to the doctor or physical therapists who treated you and ask for further help. This comes under "occupational therapy".
Jan
21
comment Odd question for our music producers
Simple double-tracking is a form of overdubbing. It's the same mechanical action whether the person is overdubbing a unison line or a harmony line.
Jan
21
comment Odd question for our music producers
Punching in/out is not overdubbing at all, since traditionally on a punch-in you are re-recording onto the same track, not adding an additional track. I'm referring to the original use of the term going back to the earliest tape recordings in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Overdubbing means adding additional tracks or bouncing tracks using a secondary recording medium or a mixing bus on a single multi-track medium.
Jan
21
comment Odd question for our music producers
@ShawnStrickland, No. Corrections are only special cases of overdubbing. Did you read the Wikipedia article? "Double-tracking" refers to just that -- doubling a part in unison. Overdubbing includes all of it, including harmonies, or one person playing multiple instruments, or adding whole new tracks to a session done elsewhere on a different day.