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Jan
22
comment Reaper GUI dissapearing
I am certain that Reaper has a user discussion forum. You should post your question there because it is full of Reaper experts. There are not many people who use Reaper on this site.
Jan
22
comment Bad back… is it better for me to play with lumbar support?
If you have a bad back, don't play in bed. You are slumping all the time. Either play standing up, with the piano keyboard surface elevated to elbow height, or play sitting up straight on a bench, again with the keyboard surface at elbow height. If you have been treated for scoliosis, then go back to the doctor or physical therapists who treated you and ask for further help. This comes under "occupational therapy".
Jan
21
comment Odd question for our music producers
Simple double-tracking is a form of overdubbing. It's the same mechanical action whether the person is overdubbing a unison line or a harmony line.
Jan
21
comment Odd question for our music producers
Punching in/out is not overdubbing at all, since traditionally on a punch-in you are re-recording onto the same track, not adding an additional track. I'm referring to the original use of the term going back to the earliest tape recordings in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Overdubbing means adding additional tracks or bouncing tracks using a secondary recording medium or a mixing bus on a single multi-track medium.
Jan
21
comment Odd question for our music producers
@ShawnStrickland, No. Corrections are only special cases of overdubbing. Did you read the Wikipedia article? "Double-tracking" refers to just that -- doubling a part in unison. Overdubbing includes all of it, including harmonies, or one person playing multiple instruments, or adding whole new tracks to a session done elsewhere on a different day.
Jan
21
comment Is there such thing as a piano-like keyboard with all whole tones between two adjacent white keys?
@LindsayWinkler no, but that looks interesting. The one I saw had normal full-sized piano key and strictly alternated between "white" and "black". And it was a company in the USA; the one in your link is in Switzerland.
Jan
20
comment Why is the lowest note on the piano an A?
This is off-topic but the Stuart & Sons has much more going for it than the extra notes. The sound is uncanny -- crystal clear with amazing sustain. It's in a class by itself.
Jan
20
comment Why is the lowest note on the piano an A?
It's quite amazing that the last innovation in the number of notes was the 97-key Bösendorfer in 1900, and it was not until 2009 that the latest innovation, the 102-key Stuart & Sons, was technologically possible. Contrast this with the rapid innovations in pianos between about 1812 and 1880. That shows that the technology went about as far as it could up until 1900 and then had to wait more than a century to go any further.
Jan
20
comment Why is the lowest note on the piano an A?
I have written to Stuart & Sons with questions and gotten a personal reply. They built their first 102-key model in 2009. They say that they were only able to achieve this when French builder Stephen Paulello made available a new technology in piano wire strings -- which goes to show that all of this history was driven by the technology of making strings above all else.
Jan
20
comment Is F Lydian mode in the “key” of C Major?
@RockinCowboy, exactly. And this idea that F Lydian is a mode of F goes all the way back to the Gregorian Chants circa the 8th Century AD. I should have mentioned that in my answer. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gregorian_chant
Jan
20
comment Why is the lowest note on the piano an A?
@RockinCowboy, I didn't say that they stopped at low "A" solely because of physics. I said it was the "sweet spot" of physics and technology and commerce, meaning popularity among the piano-buying public. Bösendorfer is still building 97-key 290 models, but I doubt that they make much money doing it. I suspect that their "regular" 88-key models earn the money; the rare 290 with its very high price is almost a prestige item.
Jan
20
comment Is F Lydian mode in the “key” of C Major?
@Tim, OK, that's my point. Generally speaking saying the letter name alone does indeed presuppose that it's the major mode. My professor never failed to point out that this is not the case 100% of the time; for example, when somebody says "F" but they mean "F Lydian".
Jan
20
comment Is F Lydian mode in the “key” of C Major?
I think you've got my intent. This is my old professor's way of impressing upon us the importance of recognizing the tonal center, and then understanding that a composer can build different scales and modes on that tonal center.
Jan
18
comment What is a “stunt guitarist”?
Google "Adrian Belew" and "stunt guitar" and you'll find a lot of hits too. Adrian Belew has been using the term "stunt guitarist" to describe himself throughout his career.
Jan
18
comment What do the ratios of the partials in inharmonic spectra deviate from?
"Stretched octaves" refers to the practice by piano tuners of deliberately altering strict mathematical tuning ratios to accommodate the particular design of the individual piano they are tuning. Look up some resources on piano tuning if you want to learn about "stretch tuning".
Jan
18
comment What do the ratios of the partials in inharmonic spectra deviate from?
Real live piano strings vibrating on a real piano do not behave exactly according to pure mathematical formulae. Neither does anything else in the real world of physics. By "precise ratios" he is referring to those derived from mathematical formulae that describe theoretically ideal piano strings, which again, don't actually exist.
Jan
18
comment What do the ratios of the partials in inharmonic spectra deviate from?
What author, and what paragraph in what book? Surely you can edit your question to include the precise bibliographical reference.
Jan
18
comment What is a “stunt guitarist”?
I don't think there's a printed album liner note credit that says "Adrian Belew, Impossible Guitar", certainly not by Zappa himself, but the phrase "impossible guitar" has been strongly associated with Adrian Belew throughout his career, as you can clearly see by a Google search. There's even a Digitech effects pedal configuration for sale called the "Adrian Belew Impossible Pedal". digitech.com/en-US/products/the-impossible
Jan
18
comment What is a “stunt guitarist”?
Here is Belew's entire lengthy post. You may need a Facebook account to view it. facebook.com/AdrianBelew/posts/10150588871654995
Jan
18
comment What is a “stunt guitarist”?
It just so happens that last week on Tuesday, January 12, 2016, Belew referred to himself in a Facebook post as Frank Zappa's "stunt" guitarist, as part of a remembrance about meeting David Bowie. "In 1978 I did my first tour of Europe as "stunt" guitarist and singer for Frank Zappa's band." He was mentioning this title in an informal sense, but hey, he's the man. facebook.com/AdrianBelew