15,767 reputation
12260
bio website wheatwilliams.com
location Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America
age 50
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen 10 hours ago

Apple Certified Macintosh Technician (ACMT) and Apple Sales Professional (ASP).

Microsoft Windows SBS 2008 (Small Business Server) Network Administrator, supporting Windows 7 clients.

Volunteer business administrator for the Atlanta Baroque Orchestra.

I have also been a technical writer, computer magazine tech journalist, music critic and music journalist, copywriter and publicist, and professional musician.

Languages: English, with some German (Deutsch), Spanish (español), and French (français)


Feb
11
comment What do these numbers at the start of the music score mean
They mean that the tempo is 107 beats per minute, and the time signature is 6/8. However, there is an obvious error in your example. It shows in the metronome mark that a quarter note equals 107 beats per minute. It should say that a dotted quarter note equals 107 beats per minute, as this would be in keeping with the time signature.
Feb
11
comment In blues, country blues, why don't songwriters get sued for aping the same progressions/tempos/scales as other established blues songs?
Yes, @MarcksThomas, you are correct. But when a composer registers a copyright, it does not mean that a court has judged that the piece is unique. It just means that there has been a record that a piece has been registered for a copyright. It still all comes down to the plaintiff's ability to convince a judge and a courtroom that he holds a copyright that has been infringed upon by a defendant. And generally, at least in the United States of America, where I live, a chord progression in the absence of a melody does not hold up in court as grounds for infringement.
Feb
11
comment In blues, country blues, why don't songwriters get sued for aping the same progressions/tempos/scales as other established blues songs?
Any time you make a substantially new arrangement or version of a traditional song in the public domain, you can copyright your new version. That is permissable under international copyright law.
Feb
11
comment In blues, country blues, why don't songwriters get sued for aping the same progressions/tempos/scales as other established blues songs?
Who exactly would have legal standing to sue someone over such an infringement? If you bring a lawsuit, the judge asks you to prove that you have standing to sue, meaning that you own something that somebody else is stealing. Nowhere does "the law" prosecute someone for plagiarism or copyright infringement. The party who owns something has to bring a lawsuit against someone that they allege is stealing something from them. Nobody would have legal standing for the kind of lawsuit you are envisioning.
Feb
10
comment In blues, country blues, why don't songwriters get sued for aping the same progressions/tempos/scales as other established blues songs?
I'm also a little puzzled by your comment about "commodification that was not present in earlier societies". The reality is the opposite. For centuries, composers have always "borrowed" material from other composers. However, it is only in the most recent 100 years or so that there has been a legal framework for copyrighting of music that enabled people to sue for damages for infringement, and only in the last 100 years or so that there has been a concept called "in the public domain" for songs.
Feb
10
comment In blues, country blues, why don't songwriters get sued for aping the same progressions/tempos/scales as other established blues songs?
But I should point out that we don't use your term of "legal plagiarism". We call it "adapting something that is in the public domain". It is not considered plagiarism if everyone knows what the source is, and no copyright is being violated. This is a legitimate technique in songwriting and music composition.
Feb
10
comment In blues, country blues, why don't songwriters get sued for aping the same progressions/tempos/scales as other established blues songs?
Basically anything written before about 1920, anywhere in the world, is in the public domain and can be freely adapted into new compositions. This is an important concept.
Feb
10
comment In blues, country blues, why don't songwriters get sued for aping the same progressions/tempos/scales as other established blues songs?
Yes, certainly. "Legal" plagiarism involves copying something from a song that is in the public domain, meaning that it is so old that it cannot be copyrighted, or if it once had a copyright, said copyright has expired. Songwriters and composers do this all the time, and it is legitimate.
Feb
9
comment Is “16va” proper notation?
Italian: 8va is "all'ottava" and 8vb is "all'ottava bassa"
Feb
9
comment Origin of the asymmetrical keyboard layout of a piano
Also, "tuned to pure harmonic thirds" is an oversimplification of the matter of temperament. It's more generally correct to say "in meantone tuning" although what that means is a very complicated subject.
Feb
9
comment Origin of the asymmetrical keyboard layout of a piano
It's good of you to cite the Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians (or Grove Online as it is called today), which is the most authoritative source for questions like this. But note that you can only access that link if you have a paid subscription to the service, or if you are using a computer through a library that pays for a site license subscription.
Feb
1
comment What scales are suitable for funk? Is there a funk scale?
The pentatonic blues scale probably figures in there, as all rock is based on the blues.
Feb
1
comment What scales are suitable for funk? Is there a funk scale?
Major, Mixolydian and Dorian are used, just as they are in rock.
Feb
1
comment Looking for genres or songs similar to the acoustic guitar part at the end of Black Sabbath's Heaven and Hell
You can hear the influence of Renaissance and Baroque music in metal and hard rock. Artists like Yngwie Malmsteen, Ritchie Blackmore, Jethro Tull, and many others have incorporated actual Renaissance and Baroque compositions into their songs and guitar solos.
Feb
1
comment Looking for genres or songs similar to the acoustic guitar part at the end of Black Sabbath's Heaven and Hell
Some people use the terms interchangeably, but true medieval music rarely involved any kind of harmony or chords. It was mostly melody and percussion. Ideas like counterpoint and chord progressions evolved as the Medieval period gave way to the Renaissance period and then the Baroque. Very often when you see those fantasy games or movies, the music has been composed in the Renaissance style, so the composer can use counterpoint and chord progressions, which are more familiar to today's listener.
Feb
1
comment Looking for genres or songs similar to the acoustic guitar part at the end of Black Sabbath's Heaven and Hell
I think this is a legitimate question because it's a chance to talk about a historical style of classical music that has a definite influence on modern metal.
Feb
1
comment How to translate rock guitar style to keyboards?
Yes, @Tim, you are absolutely correct. I didn't want to write an entire book on barre chords, so I just thought I would introduce the questioner to the concept of the voicings of the basic first-position, open chords. Feel free to edit and modify my answer, or add your own answer, if you want to explain barre chords.
Jan
31
comment Where to find practice tracks for jazz piano (specifically for the realbook)
+1 for iReal Pro and Band-in-a-Box. The former is inexpensive and very simple to use; the latter is expensive and hard to use but produces rewarding results.
Jan
30
comment How to play upstrokes with our hand when playing an acoustic guitar?
If you really need help with this, reading written descriptions of it is not going to help. You need to take lessons with a teacher who can work with you personally.
Jan
28
comment Are there limits for the possible pieces for different violins?
No. But full-size violins are for adults, and smaller violins are for children who have not yet grown to the size that they can play a full-size violin. All fully-grown people should play a full-size, 4/4 violin. The violin is a small instrument to begin with: the full-sized violin is the only violin that any full-grown person with normally-functioning hands should play.