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visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Feb 13 at 18:21

Jun
20
comment Is there a way to measure the consonance or dissonance of a chord?
Oooh, nice. This is interesting... If I hadn't already accepted the other answer ages ago I'd be tempted to mark this one. Thanks for posting this :)
Oct
30
comment Is there a way to measure the consonance or dissonance of a chord?
Ah, this is much more along the lines of what I was looking for. Thanks :)
Oct
30
comment Is there a way to measure the consonance or dissonance of a chord?
1/1 = 1 > 15/16, so that method doesn't work. I suspect my massaging the numbers I can come up with my own method, but I was hoping someone had already done this sort of thing in the past so I wouldn't have to (re)invent it myself.
Oct
30
comment Is there a way to measure the consonance or dissonance of a chord?
This is not quite what I'm asking about either. Is there a way to quantitatively measure the difference on consonance or dissonance between two frequencies. For example, say you played the C major chord on an instrument with equal temperament and then played the chord on an instrument with just intonation. The equal implemented would be more dissonant than the just intonation, but is there a way to measure how much more dissonant?
Oct
30
comment Is there a way to measure the consonance or dissonance of a chord?
This isn't quite what I'm asking. I understand the mathematics behind the relationships between the notes. What I'm looking for is a way to express the consonance as a value. Relationships like 1:2, 2:3, and 1:1 are consonant, and 15:16 is dissonant. Is there a way to transform that ratio into a value that represents how consonant or dissonant it is?
Aug
25
comment What's the term for the intervals between notes within a scale that produces a chord
CEG and DFA both have the same interval then, despite being a major and a minor chord, is that correct?