7,921 reputation
31669
bio website jduv.me
location ATL
age 31
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Feb 28 at 18:58

Graduate level software engineer with a love for guitar, and have played for many years. I never made it big in the music space, but I have lent my "skills" for a couple of studio sessions for some friends. Now instead of concentrating on "making it" I enjoy writing and recording the music that is my passion. I have an abnormal obsession with gear of all kinds, and I have spent a couple of years tweaking what I have until it sounds exactly the way I want it to :D.

I've also built my own amps/pedals/guitars, and heavily modified the stock one's I own. I'm an electrical engineering nerd--although I don't think I could handle it as a profession--I still find the physical properties of guitars/amps/effects fascinating. You can find me on twitter at the address below.

http://www.twitter.com/jduv2683


Jan
20
comment Singing notes while playing scales
Additionally, it will build your "tone memory" as you do this. It's exceedingly useful to listen to a song and be able to pick it apart without having a guitar in your hands. I have learned many a song this way, just from memorizing the tones of scales and chords and matching them as I listen to the song.
Jan
20
comment Why do some artists tune their guitars half a step or whole step down?
Fixed the typo, and RIP.
Jan
20
asked What's a good strategy for adjusting pole pieces?
Jan
20
comment Tips on playing with wah-wah for beginners
The half-cocked wah tone is all over the place. I'm sure if I went through my music collection and listed the songs and artists that utilize it you'd be very surprised at where it turns up. It's a very versatile sound and cuts through the mix pretty well in lots of applications.
Jan
20
answered Why do some artists tune their guitars half a step or whole step down?
Jan
20
answered What is concert pitch?
Jan
20
comment What are Tone Pots / Potentiometers?
If you'll notice on that diagram, the older way of wiring a tone pot included placing one post at the sweeper lug on the pot and the other post on the input to the tone control. This compensates for a volume drop that occurs as the logarithmic taper of a potentiometer kicks in. When you roll the volume back some of the frequencies that were bled off are allowed back into the output signal, keeping it consistant. The drawback to this schema is that the tone value changes as you move the volume--so every time you change the volume you have to tweak the tone pot to keep the tone uniform.
Jan
20
comment What are Tone Pots / Potentiometers?
That actually is NOT vintage wiring. PLacing a capacitor across the volume pot is called a treble bleed capacitor, and it's usually paired with a specific resistor depending on the type of potentiometer you are installing them on along with the output of the pickups. The so-called "vintage" wiring on Les Pauls is very hard to nail down because each guitar could have been wired completely different. A diagram of true '57 wiring (the only consistent one to my knowledge) is located here: lollarguitars.com/pickup-wiring-diagrams/…
Jan
20
comment Why is an amplifier's effects loop useful?
I actually prefer all my modulation to be pre-distortion, so be careful saying that it is better for my tone ;D. Post distortion chorus sounds 80's, but if you place it pre-distortion it has a subtle fattening effect.
Jan
20
comment What are Tone Pots / Potentiometers?
Great answer Alex! It would be more illustrative with a picture though. Another good article on this subject is located here: stewmac.com/freeinfo/Electronics/Pots/w101-tonecontrol.html
Jan
19
comment Cheap alternative to a SG Standard
Epiphone has some decent stuff for the price. I've played cheap ones too mind you, so go play one before you purchase (the universal rule of guitar buying)
Jan
18
asked Balanced triodes. Gimmick, or worth the money?
Jan
18
asked When should I be concerned about calibrating the bias of vacuum tubes in an amplifier?
Jan
18
comment How does scale length affect my playing?
You mentioned fanned-fret instruments in your answer and oddly I had never heard of them. I had heard of strange frettings such as the true-temperament system however. How does scale length factor in there? Should that be an entirely different question?
Jan
18
asked How does scale length affect my playing?
Jan
18
comment Multi-Effects Pedal or Multiple Effects Pedals?
Moved the "obviously digital" section out of the "cons" and explained it a little more in detail. Hopefully that looks better!
Jan
17
comment String buzz on bass guitar
Agreed, and specifically since you mention that the nut is metal. If the string fits in the slot snugly (therefore ruling the string slot out as a vibration source), then it might be that there isn't enough tension to keep the nut secured to the fretboard, or the fretboard surface where the nut makes contact may not be perfectly level. That would make sense given that more tension (i.e. the duct tape job) reduces the buzzing.
Jan
17
answered String buzz on bass guitar
Jan
17
comment String buzz on bass guitar
Can you localize the buzzing? As the string travels, does it hit any frets at all, or is the buzzing coming from the saddle or perhaps the nut?
Jan
17
comment What's causing this buzzing sound on the high e string?
Updated to reflect Bill's comment. Thanks!