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May
27
reviewed No Action Needed Home recording!
May
27
reviewed Reviewed Reason Propellerhead, to set a fixed velocity for keyboard midi input, while recording
May
27
reviewed Reviewed Dissonances and harmony
May
27
comment Why does a clarinet behaves like a closed pipe?
+1, but an important note of clarity is that the main point asked about in the question is about the harmonics for each type--and that both the conical and open-cylindrical instruments are similar in that regard (with only the closed-cylindrical instruments, like clarinet, behaving very differently).
May
27
comment Why does a clarinet behaves like a closed pipe?
I did some additional reading on this and I think I understand--the difference in behavior you're asking about is all to do with harmonics, yes? It would be good to include a reference at the top of the question to the known differences and definitions between closed and open pipes--clarity like that always helps get better answers. The first paragraph is still a little confusing to me, particularly the "pierced pipe" bit. Actually, I'm more curious now as to why oboes and saxophones don't behave like the "closed pipe" clarinet, in contrast to the open-pipe flute.
May
27
comment Why does a clarinet behaves like a closed pipe?
It's just very unclear from your question what you mean by a closed or open pipe, and what characteristics they are expected to have. All keyed reed instruments that I am familiar with (flute, clarinet, saxophone) operate by changing the length of the tube by way of closing and opening keys, and changing register by venting the tube near a desired harmonic node. There are differences as you have noted in the harmonic profile of the clarinet, but it's unclear why that is expected to be dependent upon the tube-ness of the instrument and not other aspects of its construction.
May
26
comment Why does a clarinet behaves like a closed pipe?
I believe you have some incorrect assumptions here -- the closed/open pipe phenomenon is readily demonstrated with boomwhackers, but does not apply here since all of the mentioned reed instruments are closed at one end and open at the other. The difference in register key interval has only to do with the location of the vent created by the register key.
May
18
comment Macbook pro to piano with MIDI problem
This is almost certainly not a problem with your Mac. You've left out some important information, which is how you are connecting the YDP-161 to your Mac. The YDP-161 doesn't have a USB port and the Mac doesn't have a MIDI input, so you must be using some kind of interface between the two. This is the first thing you need to troubleshoot, and so far it is unclear what you are using.
May
15
answered How do I play this part in 'Portrait of Tracy'?
May
15
comment How do I play this part in 'Portrait of Tracy'?
Is that a typo where it says "2nd fret of the H string"?
May
3
answered Grand Staff using the Bass Clef and Treble Alto-Tenor Clef
Apr
30
comment Mouth Trumpet: Maintenance
Maybe it's this thing? usa.yamaha.com/products/musical-instruments/entertainment/…
Apr
29
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
27
awarded  Yearling
Apr
26
comment Square bracket next to two notes
"Frosty the Snowman"?
Apr
20
comment Marimba Bars on a Vibraphone Frame
Marimba OR vibes, BOTH are expensive and it's not very common for a student to have a set at home unless they're VERY serious -- and usually have some parental support. +1 for going to school to practice -- I know of a guy who made an arrangement with the band teacher after he graduated to come in in the mornings and practice the school marimba for auditions. This is by far the most common way to practice at the high school level (and your band teacher will love you). Just organize your day so you can be at school when it's time to practice.
Apr
16
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
4
comment How do you write an instrumental part for a choir?
I would probably group flutes with violin since those are the quietest instruments. Baritone horn and trumpet are the loudest as your brass, and cello can be grouped since it plays in a similar range as baritone (but I'm not sure about this at the primary school level). Xylophones could be grouped with the treble instruments with soft mallets, or might be a separate group with the percussion. You didn't say who was playing piano, but I don't know what I would do if it wasn't the complete background part.
Apr
4
answered How do you write an instrumental part for a choir?