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Mar
21
comment How do I to calculate note's frequency using no intervals?
f(given) = 2^((given-A4)/12) * 440
Mar
21
comment How do I to calculate note's frequency using no intervals?
There are no inherent mathematical properties in the letters A-G that can enable them to be translated to frequencies without the use of a constant. The letter assignments are completely arbitrary; thus you need some kind of constant to define them — 440 Hz. Your equation makes use of the number 12, so you clearly have the ability to define a constant value in your equation; if all you're trying to do is create a function definition f(p) where p is the pitch, the frequency of which is being calculated, then this is really an algebra question.
Mar
21
revised Why can some people play music well who don't “know music”?
formatting/typos
Mar
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
2
answered How to do vibrato on the saxophone?
Mar
2
comment How to do vibrato on the saxophone?
@guidot Reed family instruments use very different techniques and concepts for vibrato. Saxophone vibrato is actually a more similar technique to brass instrument vibrato than the other reeds (especially bassoon).
Feb
25
answered What does “Time on” mean in the context of a Lead Sheet?
Feb
19
comment Amp modeller that exists in a computer program?
Amp modeling is available on a number of commercial products -- Garageband and Guitar Rig are two examples off the top of my head. But you're talking about reverse-engineering an amp model from a sound sample. That's a COMPLETELY different story, and mathematically is only possible to an approximation--making it not really viable for commercial products to my knowledge.
Feb
18
revised Numbering notes instead of giving them letter names
fixed formatting
Feb
17
comment How to play repeating chords fast on piano
It is well known that Schubert's "Der Erlkönig" is dreaded by pianists for this very reason -- some will even just outright refuse to play it. You need to be studying with a good teacher to know if you've reached your physical limit or if you just need to work on your technique.
Feb
10
answered How do I figure out whether rhythms have beats with 2/3-1/3 splits or 3/4-1/4 splits?
Feb
9
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
9
comment How can we sing in tune, given a perfect ear for music, if we always hear ourselves lower than we actually sound?
@Mr.Boy Report back with your findings and we'll peer review!
Feb
9
comment How can we sing in tune, given a perfect ear for music, if we always hear ourselves lower than we actually sound?
@Mr.Boy No, it doesn't. You are hearing a filtering effect. See above.
Feb
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
9
comment How can we sing in tune, given a perfect ear for music, if we always hear ourselves lower than we actually sound?
@ToddWilcox I don't remember a lot of high school physics, but I remember this being pretty important--materials change wavelength because they ALSO change the speed at which the wave is moving. The frequency stays constant because all three factors are related. Think of the border between two different materials (two different slinkies tied together is a good visualization): the waves are reaching and crossing that border at a regular time interval, but then the waves propagate through the material with a different speed and wavelength.
Feb
9
comment How can we sing in tune, given a perfect ear for music, if we always hear ourselves lower than we actually sound?
@ToddWilcox I just watched the video referenced, and I would argue that it is incorrect. Materials can't shift pitch, they can only filter it. If you inhale helium, your voice still sounds higher to a listener even though the entire room is not filled with helium.
Feb
9
answered How can we sing in tune, given a perfect ear for music, if we always hear ourselves lower than we actually sound?
Feb
5
comment What is the name of these tubes, that emit sound when being swung?
Such a fantastic video!
Feb
2
comment How to create guitar tabs with similar notation to Japanese Band Scores?
I'd be surprised if SoftwareRecs.SE had a better audience for a question such as this, as it's highly specific to notation. Anyway, I would expect to be able to accomplish this with any full-featured professional notation software.