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2d
comment Why do people sometimes write notes as E♯ or C♭?
@supercat Yes. Intervals are a measure of distance, not direction, but if you were describing a melody, then you would still call it an upward third since it goes from a B to a D.
2d
comment Why do people sometimes write notes as E♯ or C♭?
@200_success (Dom, he wrote Cx - Ebb.) Yup, that would be considered a triple-diminished third.
2d
comment Why do people sometimes write notes as E♯ or C♭?
@TungD.Nguyen I don't know many beginners playing atonal music. If the music is tonal, beginners should be reading correct notation. Granted; most beginners aren't playing in keys with Cb, Fb, etc., but it's not a choice about what notes are easier to read, it's about which note is the correct scale degree.
Apr
27
comment Is there a note that stays the same?
The whole point of a scale is that it is a sequence of intervals of varying size. With the exception of the chromatic scale, you can shift (transpose) any other scale so that one of the "empty spaces" is over any note.
Apr
26
comment How can I prevent clipping when using a microphone with a tube amp into a PA?
Well, maybe you can help them find the gain knob on the mixer
Apr
25
comment Can I use Keyboard amps for live monitoring?
@MattPutnam Now, I didn't say anything about the master volume :-P
Mar
21
comment How do I to calculate note's frequency using no intervals?
The answer to your question as written is "No, it's not possible." This is because a pitch->frequency conversion actually requires a second argument that defines the tuning system in use. When you omit this, we assume that the tuning system will be 12-tone equal temperament at A=440Hz, and so this information must be embedded in your formula as constants.
Mar
21
comment How do I to calculate note's frequency using no intervals?
I can write you a JavaScript function that takes an absolute pitch and outputs a frequency. It should be obvious how to do this from the information already here. But any reasonable solution would make use of subtraction arithmetic from constant values. It is unclear what your constraint is--is this some kind of programming riddle?
Mar
21
comment How do I to calculate note's frequency using no intervals?
I do think this is an XY problem, frankly. What are you trying to accomplish by answering this question? Are you just having trouble translating note names into numeric values?
Mar
21
comment How do I to calculate note's frequency using no intervals?
My function doesn't have a 'number of semitones' argument. It just takes a given pitch. You MUST, as part of the formula/function, find the difference of that pitch from A4 in order to complete the calculation.
Mar
21
comment How do I to calculate note's frequency using no intervals?
f(given) = 2^((given-A4)/12) * 440
Mar
21
comment How do I to calculate note's frequency using no intervals?
There are no inherent mathematical properties in the letters A-G that can enable them to be translated to frequencies without the use of a constant. The letter assignments are completely arbitrary; thus you need some kind of constant to define them — 440 Hz. Your equation makes use of the number 12, so you clearly have the ability to define a constant value in your equation; if all you're trying to do is create a function definition f(p) where p is the pitch, the frequency of which is being calculated, then this is really an algebra question.
Mar
2
comment How to do vibrato on the saxophone?
@guidot Reed family instruments use very different techniques and concepts for vibrato. Saxophone vibrato is actually a more similar technique to brass instrument vibrato than the other reeds (especially bassoon).
Feb
19
comment Amp modeller that exists in a computer program?
Amp modeling is available on a number of commercial products -- Garageband and Guitar Rig are two examples off the top of my head. But you're talking about reverse-engineering an amp model from a sound sample. That's a COMPLETELY different story, and mathematically is only possible to an approximation--making it not really viable for commercial products to my knowledge.
Feb
17
comment How to play repeating chords fast on piano
It is well known that Schubert's "Der Erlkönig" is dreaded by pianists for this very reason -- some will even just outright refuse to play it. You need to be studying with a good teacher to know if you've reached your physical limit or if you just need to work on your technique.
Feb
9
comment How can we sing in tune, given a perfect ear for music, if we always hear ourselves lower than we actually sound?
@Mr.Boy Report back with your findings and we'll peer review!
Feb
9
comment How can we sing in tune, given a perfect ear for music, if we always hear ourselves lower than we actually sound?
@Mr.Boy No, it doesn't. You are hearing a filtering effect. See above.
Feb
9
comment How can we sing in tune, given a perfect ear for music, if we always hear ourselves lower than we actually sound?
@ToddWilcox I don't remember a lot of high school physics, but I remember this being pretty important--materials change wavelength because they ALSO change the speed at which the wave is moving. The frequency stays constant because all three factors are related. Think of the border between two different materials (two different slinkies tied together is a good visualization): the waves are reaching and crossing that border at a regular time interval, but then the waves propagate through the material with a different speed and wavelength.
Feb
9
comment How can we sing in tune, given a perfect ear for music, if we always hear ourselves lower than we actually sound?
@ToddWilcox I just watched the video referenced, and I would argue that it is incorrect. Materials can't shift pitch, they can only filter it. If you inhale helium, your voice still sounds higher to a listener even though the entire room is not filled with helium.
Feb
5
comment What is the name of these tubes, that emit sound when being swung?
Such a fantastic video!