513 reputation
29
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Dec 31 '13 at 2:44

Jan
30
comment How does the piano middle pedal work? Is there a standard symbol for it?
Remarkable piece of engineering! Thank you very much for the schematics. Although it may be slightly different depending on the maker, I now understand how (and why) it works!
Jan
29
comment How does the piano middle pedal work? Is there a standard symbol for it?
Thanks for the notation on the sost. pedal, Reina, but I know I have a sostenuto pedal, and I know how and when to use it. What I do not know is how it actually works, mechanically. Probably this is not very explicit in my question, I will edit it. Good answer though, +1! :)
Jan
29
comment How does the piano middle pedal work? Is there a standard symbol for it?
@BrianSlesinsky I have just edited the question, specifying the middle pedal.
Jan
26
comment How do classical composers write music?
@DrMayhem I don't know why, but I can't believe that they were not gifted. IMHO they were gifted AND worked really hard, and that's why they're who they're.
Jan
26
comment How do classical composers write music?
+1 for the good detailed answer, but I would add that the big ones (Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Bartok, Prokofiev, Tchaikovsky, etc...) are geniuses! That's why they're the "big ones".
Jan
14
comment How many keys should I require for a keyboard for ABRSM piano exams?
@JoshFields That's true, you're absolutely right about the "serious" student with a 61 keyboard on mind. I didn't notice. Well, never mind, looks like the question owner forgot the topic... When you have a chance, go check out the new clavinova 400 series, they are awesome!
Jan
13
comment How many keys should I require for a keyboard for ABRSM piano exams?
@JoshFields, I would agree with you if Yamaha didn't change their sound engine in the new Clavinovas. The new RGE engine is simply amazing, comparing the new with the old engine is like comparing wine and water, it is not possible. Plus, the Graded Hammer is ok, but the GH3 is way better! The feel is about the same, but the behavior is much closer to a grand piano than the GH. As I said in my first post, for a serious piano student (not just a weekend hobby) those extras are a must in my opinion.
Jan
11
comment How many keys should I require for a keyboard for ABRSM piano exams?
@Kidburla, you can buy a digital piano without a cabinet. For instance, you can take the Yamaha P-155, it is a 88key graded hammer digital piano, without a cabinet. Of course the sound will not be as good as a clavinova, since the cabinet provides a lot of space for the speakers and amplifiers. Another very important feature is the key action featured in your keyboard. I will edit my answer with some info and some personal recommendations.
Dec
20
comment Key signature for writing in modes other than major and minor
I would chose the C major key signature. As somebody already said, a musician should know that the key signature is only used to simplify the process of reading and writing. For instance, Heller sometimes changes the key signature when he modulates to a different tonality.
Dec
19
comment What are the most common ways to “decorate” a melody?
+1 for the extensive list. I think a reference site would fit well, since your answer does not contain much historic background or theoretical background.
Dec
18
comment What are the most common ways to “decorate” a melody?
@Ali The problem here is that your question is too "wide", if you know what I mean. For instance, something that would fit better is "Is the method X a good one to decorate the following melody?" There's not much you can do. I gave it a +1 because even though it's a "bad" fit, it's a wonderful question! Do not narrow it down, there's no need to worry.
Dec
18
comment What are the most common ways to “decorate” a melody?
+1 for the helpful answers that can appear with such question. Although your question does not fit well here, we can (and already have one) get very good answers.
Dec
18
comment What are the most common ways to “decorate” a melody?
+1 for the very good resumed explanation! And, if you want more amazing examples on counterpoint go grab a J. S. Bach book, a good coffee, and be amazed!
Dec
13
comment Trying to program a piano staff/stave. Is this what it's supposed to look like?
True, my bad, I misread it. Edit your answer so I can remove the my down vote.
Dec
13
comment Trying to program a piano staff/stave. Is this what it's supposed to look like?
The vertical positioning is wrong considering that he played 25 notes straight (15 white, 10 black). For example: F and F# have the same vertical position in most key signatures. And I prefer Lilypond over Sibelius... xD
Dec
13
comment Trying to program a piano staff/stave. Is this what it's supposed to look like?
@Sean, well, that's important info. You're reading on the wrong places. Google something like "how to read music". The position and symbols that complement a note depends on which clef and which key signature you chose.
Dec
12
comment Have a note outstand in a pianissimo chord (piano)
There was a Bartók piece I once played, which I had to change the last chord to make it as expressive as I wanted. This is what I did: Take the Bbb and make it a grace note, play it first, then press the left pedal and play the rest of the chord. Attention: I don't know the piece, nor if you have room to make such big changes in the piece.
Dec
6
comment With regards to piano sheet music, when are you supposed to press the pedal(s)?
+1 for the good answer! I just want to add some info. It's important to add that the pedal will add some power to a chord. For instance, take Beethoven's opus 49-2, the first G chord, when played with pedal is much more powerful! But it's important not to overuse the pedal. For example, whenever I'm playing a piece with big "legato-like" jumps (For instance, some Bartoks or Prokofievs) sometimes I use the middle pedal, this way I won't create a resonance and add more sound where it's not needed.
Nov
28
comment (Free) exercises for intermediate piano player
I agree with @NReilingh, It's also worth noting that many "normal" pieces are artistic, expressive and didactic. Bach's Little Preludes and Fughetas is a classic example. Forget Czerny (I don't like most of Czerny's work), go for Heller instead, opus 45, 46 and 47. Bartok and Prokofiev are also very interesting (and didactic), since they tend to explore very non-standard rhythmic and phrasing aspects.
Nov
23
comment What exercises can I do to improve my timing?
@slim I have just edited my answer, indeed, the drum machine is important info.