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Mar
22
comment Detect piano notes and chords
@iankit: Likely much more money and research time has been spent on speech recognition than on music transcription. Speech is monophonic: Siri fails if multiple people try to speak into the same iPhone at the same time. Speech recognition is also much less sensitive to correct pitch analysis, just the slope trend is often enough.
Mar
4
comment How does a pipe organist deal with latency or delay?
Not sure about the latest iPads. But with previous iOS models, the electronics seemed to take about 1 video frame time (16.7mS) to verify and locate the touch, and the OS took about 1 frame time to deliver a touch event to the app's run loop. That's 33 mS. Then there's another app-to-audio-DAC buffering latency of (2 or 3) * 5.8 mS added to the response. So, on the order of 50 mS for any app, given the hardware available, even for Pro apps and perfect touch.
Feb
28
comment When does audio latency matter and not matter?
Even wired organ keyboards will have a big problem if the pipes are 30M+ away (100+ mS, close to a 16th note delay). How does the organist play in time with the choral conductor?
Feb
28
comment When does audio latency matter and not matter?
So, given your experience, it seems that not only drums, but simulated stringed instruments on any iPhone or iPad should also feel unacceptable to an experienced musician, assuming that the reports of around a 50 mS minimum latency from physical touch to audio output are correct. Same with "blown" virtual wind instruments, given around 15 to 17 mS of latency from mic to audio, (not counting DSP "blow" detection) minimum.
Aug
5
comment How do I practice (vocal) pitch without an instructor?
There are lots of computer software and mobile apps that can give you real-time feedback on your pitch accuracy. You could try practicing singing while using one of those.
Aug
3
comment Vocal tuning (metering, not autotuning)
Shameless plug follows: Sing-inTuna, an iPhone app I wrote to help me practice singing. Shows several different tuning markers that respond in under 100 milliseconds with an accuracy of a maybe few cents. It's in the iOS App Store.
Aug
3
comment Color coded spectrum analyzer
I wrote an iPhone app that does something like that. For clean monophonic audio input, it draws a line where a note should appear on a grand staff, and colors that line green for in-tune, red for sharp, and blue for flat. You end up with a line graph of the note pitches, colored for pitch. It's called Sing-inTuna, in Apple's App Store.
May
23
comment When I play the C chord, why does the electronic tuner indicate that it is a G chord?
+1 : This is a common misconception about how electronic tuners work. I develop tuner apps, and do get this question occasionally.
May
23
comment Tuning a tuning fork?
@idober : I used multiple tuner apps, including the Peterson strobe tuner, ClearTune, plus (shameless advertisement) my own inTuna and iChromatic Strobe Tuners, and on three different iOS device models (in case the audio sample rate clock was way off on one of them). They all said 8 cents sharp, +- 1 cent. (I also calibrate my own apps against WWV.)
May
23
comment Tuning a tuning fork?
The package said 440, which is what I wanted. I wonder if someone put a fork for a European tuning or something in the wrong box?