762 reputation
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bio website mst.rwth-aachen.de
location Aachen, Germany
age
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Feb 4 at 22:28

Apr
28
comment Can anyone learn to sing higher?
@WheatWilliams: Voices develop over time. A bass might not be able to sing tenor right now, but that doesn't mean he will never be able to sing tenor. (I've moved up from high baritone to first tenor in the last few years, so I know it's possible!)
Apr
28
comment Can anyone learn to sing higher?
You haven't mentioned how old you are. For men, their voices keep maturing across a long period of time—well into their late 20's or early 30's. Moreover, just because you don't know how to sing high doesn't mean you can't. It may be a matter of training, or it just might mean you're really a "power bass."
Apr
28
awarded  Commentator
Apr
28
comment Can anyone learn to sing higher?
"Professional singers . . . sing with what nature gave them." This is a factually misleading statement: some of the most famous singers of our time, including Placido Domingo, "built" their voice. (Domingo, for instance, was originally a baritone!) Nature may have given people a lot more talent than they know.
Apr
19
answered Accepted ranges for SATB choral works?
Apr
19
comment Accepted ranges for SATB choral works?
I don't think the tenor ranges are that extreme—and an occasional B flat in the tenor I part could be quite thrilling in practice. Also, I've known quite a few sopranos at the collegiate level who had the requisite notes to sing a high D flat. So it's not impossible—and the original poster mentioned it was an optional note.
Apr
19
comment Accepted ranges for SATB choral works?
I think you mean E♭4 for the soprano II's, right?
Mar
29
comment Is there a formal name for this type of composition?
@filzilla: The British concept of "fantasy" is quite different from those used in other countries. There was an old Baroque form of music called a "fantasy" (or "phantasy") featuring contrasting slow and fast sections, and predominantly scored for strings. Modern British works (such as those by Vaughan Williams or Britten) with "Fantasy" in the title harken back to this tradition.
Mar
11
awarded  Supporter
Mar
1
comment Placement of vocal soloists with orchestra
Thanks for the answer, but I think this misses the mark somewhat. I was curious about placement of soloists when there's an orchestra involved. The "couple of metros" argument doesn't normally apply in those circumstances, because the typical stage is packed full of choristers and instrumentalists in such circumstances. My question is then: why do they place soloists with the chorus for some orchestral works, but at the front of the platform for others? Is it a historical tradition for those works, or is something else at work?
Feb
28
comment Placement of vocal soloists with orchestra
Yes, I did. Thanks for the catch.
Feb
28
revised Placement of vocal soloists with orchestra
Error correction
Feb
28
awarded  Editor
Feb
28
revised Placement of vocal soloists with orchestra
Error correction
Feb
28
awarded  Student
Feb
28
asked Placement of vocal soloists with orchestra
Feb
9
answered Why are orchestras tuned differently?
Feb
7
answered What is the difference between a mode and a scale?
Feb
5
comment What is a transposing instrument?
It should be pointed out that, in some cases, the individual parts may be written in transposed form, but in the conductor's score, they won't show as transposed instruments: they will all be written "in C."
Jan
14
comment Can an accidental carry over to the next measure?
You should indicate, though, that accidentals will get carried over into the following bar if they're part of a tied note, since the entire value is considered to be a "single" note, even if it's split across multiple bars.