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seen Aug 4 '13 at 20:11

Learning to sight-sing with solfege. Alto in two choirs, one that only sight sings and one that uses no sheet music at all, you just learn by ear. I know very little musical theory but can read music in the treble clef. I teach musicianship through singing to primary children.


Jul
21
comment Important to know which note you are playing?
I've read that mediaeval choir masters also taught by this back to front method, singing the final phrase for the choir to hear first, then the last two phrases, etc. I've taught this way too, and I noticed that it really helps memory, as you're always moving to something familiar. It might be worth experimenting with the method phrase by phrase to develop a better musicality with the piece, rather than one bar or measure at a time, which is an artificial convention. After reading this I'm going to try it with some sight singing exercises.
Jun
11
comment What are the most effective ear training methods ?
7 is just building on what the student already knows, which is good teaching. Eg. in Kodaly methodology you get the children infused with the quality of,say,a minor third (soh -mi)from numerous songs. Later, when learning intervals, the children usually say unprompted, "Oh, it's like the beginning of..." They've so internalised the interval from repertoire that they can always recognise it. The technique described in number 7 above is a sort of cart before horse approach for those of us who didn't have this childhood training, but it gets you there, which is what matters.
Jun
11
comment What are the most effective ear training methods ?
Thanks, Ulf. I've now added it under the relevent question.
Jun
9
comment What are the most effective ear training methods ?
7 is just building on what the student already knows, which is good teaching. Eg. in Kodaly methodology you get the children infused with the quality of,say,a minor third (soh -mi)from numerous songs. Later, when learning intervals, the children usually say unprompted, "Oh, it's like the beginning of..." They've so internalised the interval from repertoire that they can always recognise it. The technique described in number 7 above is a sort of cart before horse approach for those of us who didn't have this childhood training, but it gets you there, which is what matters.
May
31
comment How can I overcome the fear of performing in front of an audience?
If this is any consolation... I was once so nervous about playing in a flute duet in front of my school, I lost all sensation in my fingers. Nothing except a faint tingling. It didn't help that we were last on, so there was a long wait. However, I was so well practised that I played faultlessly, despite absolute terror, and it was a very fast piece. I think the lesson here is let it happen on automatic.
Apr
29
comment Can anyone learn to sing higher?
Interesting point about Domingo. Do you think think bodes well for JohnJamesSmith?