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I play the double bass, electric bass, most brass instruments - with a preference for the low - and some other instruments, as well as sing (choir, á capella and solo). I know a fair bit of music theory and arranging, as well as some musical acoustics. I have a huge crush on musical instruments in general. My main focus is jazz and related genres, but I find myself in other contexts now and then.


Aug
12
comment What is the time signature and tempo (let's say for the intro) of Yes' Close to The Edge song?
I'd say the intro is simply 6/8 (or 6/4) and the drums are playing dotted eighths (or dotter quarters) creating a three over two polyrhythm pattern. Nothing magic. (I recall this as being refferred to in jazz as "african rhythm - where you simultaneously have room for patterns of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8, and further subdivisions - but I can't find any source for that name right now. Maybe I'm misremembering.) Of course you could notate it in 4/4 with quarter note triplets, but I beleive it would be less readable.
Aug
12
comment What instrument is this and why is it held so strangely and played?
Those are natural trumpets. :-)
Aug
9
comment Does music theory make you a better Musician? Artist?
Perhaps some form of "How does knowledge of music theory make you a better musician or artist?" would make a better music.SE question? (Although it would be quite broad.)
Aug
7
comment What should I write first
@PhaDaPhunk: This question is fairly similar: "Finding the starting point when creating a composition or score". And this question might also be of interest: "Where do musicians draw their melodies from".
Aug
5
comment How can you teach a child the names of the notes on each key on a keyboard?
@Chris: What that image also does not have are the (enharmonic) alternative names of the black keys. F# = Gb; G# = Ab; A# = Bb; C# = Db; D# = Eb.
Jul
24
comment What are the greek modes, and how do they differ from modern modes?
@AlexanderTroup: I've updated with a passage on stacking as well as calculated tuning differences (and some other stuff).
Jul
20
comment What is the difference between upstrokes and downstrokes while strumming a guitar?
+1 From my musical acoustic studies I learnt that the attack of a musical sound is very important for how the sound is perceived. A piano attack with a violin sustain will (largely) be percieved as a piano note, and a violin attack with a piano sustain will (largely) be perceived as a violin note. The guitar attack of an upstroke will always be different than the attack of a downstroke at the very least due to the order of the strings. Thus the sound will be perceived as different.
Jul
20
comment Decoupling voice from the beat
Actually I think the wording of this current question is more general and therefore possibly better, but I suppose the duplicate indication mostly serves as a reference pointer why it doesn't matter if this is the one to be marked as duplicate.
Jul
20
comment Able to recall music in its correct key, but don't have perfect pitch — what is it called?
@ReiMiyasaka: I agree with a couple of the answers that it sounds like you have perfect pitch. You just need to actively work on refining it through some perfect pitch ear training if you want it to become what you've been thinking is perfect pitch.
Jul
18
comment How to enter overlapping notes in Sibelius 7
If you use separate voices(!) for the notes there should be no problem!
Jul
17
comment practice of omitting notes in jazz piano
I read the question such as that it is notes of the melody that gets omitted, rather than notes of the chords. I imagine such as playing the full melody the first chorus, and during the next chorus omitting for instance all C notes of the melody, or perhaps all notes on the first beat of each measure, and then omitting more and more melody notes for the consecutive choruses. Is this what you are asking about? (I.e. more of a music performance gimmic technique question rather than a music theory question.)
Jul
17
comment What are the greek modes, and how do they differ from modern modes?
Maybe someone over at history.SE can provide an extensive answer? Perhaps repeat the question there?
Jul
16
comment What are the greek modes, and how do they differ from modern modes?
@luserdroog :-) I'm hoping for an ancient music expert historian to turn up and give a complete exposé on tetrachords, early music theory, and the evolution of the concept of modes.
Jul
6
comment Is there a website with easy sheet music for popular songs?
These questions answer your request at least for the classical side: music.stackexchange.com/questions/696/… , music.stackexchange.com/questions/9563/free-sheet-music-please
Jun
30
comment Finding the “Starting point” when creating a composition or score
+1 Truly great answer pointing out the importance and effect of consiously deciding on limits. I've never thought of limits as being a compositional driving force this clearly before.
Jun
21
comment Accessible Instruments While Away From Home
+1 Great ideas. @Tanaki: You could perhaps also find a local church hosting a piano, where you might talk yourself to piano access and practice time.
May
25
comment tips for initiating a music (jazz) festival
Some things you probably should sort out: Finding a venue; sorting out sound and light engineering; ticket booking and administering; staffing; artist lodging; press relations; getting and setting up (including tuning of) "non-movable" instruments such as (grand) pianos.
May
21
comment Ambidextrous instruments
@carl:Why would a regular trombone (w/o valves) be non-trivial to switch over? Except for my left arm being untrained I've found no problems when I've tried it.
May
21
comment Octave apart voicing
You should state which idiom your voice leading question applies to. (Although judging from your previous questions I have a qualified guess, but the random reader might not know.)
May
13
comment Biggest differences between 4 mallet grips
@CodyGuldner: Block chords refers to a way of homophonically playing a musical line with four part harmony. This is often employed by jazz pianists and jazz vibraphonists in melody and solo playing, as well as being a standard tool in jazz arranging for wind instruments.