144 reputation
4
bio website
location Orange County, CA
age 44
visits member for 1 year, 10 months
seen Jul 2 '13 at 8:02

Hmmm...

Guitarist/Musician/Engineer/Producer/Developer/Teacher... Jack of all Trades... Sufficiently proficient in some.


Jul
1
comment Using bass strings on guitar
"super-sensitives" ha-ha, (I imagine most people would agree with him there... "you get what you pay for").
Jul
1
comment Using bass strings on guitar
"It is generally agreed that gut and perlon-type strings sound best on violins and violas. They are certainly the most popular with players regardless of musical styles. Many players like Pirastro Eudoxa, Oliv and Gold Label gut strings. Perlon strings are essentially synthetic gut strings. Recommended brands include the perennial favorites Thomastik Dominants, though a dizzying number of variants on this type of string are now on the market: Zyex, D'Addario Pro Arté, and Pirastro Tonica or Aricore, and Savarez Crystal..." "Strings" section, last line ;-) lutherie.net/care.html
Jul
1
comment Using bass strings on guitar
a couple more relevant links I ran across (a lot of references to newer metal composition strings for Cello, not sure how this compares to Violin strings, I've been out of that game too long). paulperleycellos.com/chatterfurthertonalimprovements.html and also the "Maestro..." forums (they've got some obviously knowledgeable luthiers on there), maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/topic/… I'm sure any Cellist will enjoy the read.
Jul
1
comment Using bass strings on guitar
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Violin_construction_and_mechanics/… This seems like a pretty relevant section on Wiki (of course that's as subjective as anything, but then... there would be no science without us arguing about it right? notice all the "[citation needed]" notes); from my older experience, it seems pretty correct to me. Of course, that any comparison of tone is subjective should go without saying on this site (but usually doesn't), as I mentioned above, my own personal preference was always wound gut strings (I used Pirastro golds), IMO, the tone was more "alive", try em'.
Jul
1
comment Using bass strings on guitar
@ slim - it does make me wonder about "electric" violin/cello/upright (yes they make them all), we kind of left them out of the conversation I guess; even though I play electric guitar too (mostly now, I started on violin when 9, but pretty much quit after the first couple years of college); anyways, I never came closer to playing electric violin than putting a pair of headphones on mine and plugging them in backwards as a weird kind of micro-phonic pick-up (distortion sounds cool, so does delay) and plugging into my guitar rig. Perhaps they're built to take the increased stress better now.
Jul
1
comment Using bass strings on guitar
@ slim - Wow... all-metal Cello... I wonder if this means they will start putting truss-rods in Cellos now? Notice that the "synthetic core" sets do range lower (19-21lbs) than the steel-core. Personally I'm not sure I would use the steel-cores for this reason alone, I may take a look around the web and see if anyone has had neck problems with their vintage instruments, (I would never take the chance myself, maybe on a cheap student/practice instrument, but my good violin is worth too much). They mention a "modern" sound, I guess I'm more of a traditionalist, I always preferred gut over synth.
Jun
30
comment Using bass strings on guitar
@CarlWitthoft - I just know that overall there is more tension, it's why electric guitar/bass & steel string acoustics employ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truss_rod in their design (adjustable metal rods) inside of their necks to counterbalance that high tension and keep their necks straight; whereas I've never seen such a design on a nylon/gut stringed instrument design. I've wondered about it though, my 35-40 year old Paulino Bernabe (classical guitar) has developed just a touch too much neck bow and the action is too high now (great tone though), I've never had any trouble with my Violins.
Jun
30
comment Using bass strings on guitar
It's easy to forget... we always notate guitar an octave higher than it sounds, (but we never actually explicitly write that anywhere on the sheet music). I remember when I sat down one day trying to figure out what the heck was going on... I couldn't figure out why A440 matched 5th fret on the high E (two octaves above middle C, according to "music"), it sure confused me.
Jun
30
comment Why does my guitar sound more natural when plugged directly into a tube amp vs through a pedal board?
It should be noted that you can go too short as well, usually not a factor when dealing with pedals as you have lengths before and after, but jacked straight in, shorter cables can sometimes be a little brittle/edgy depending on the pick-ups. (I've also seen someone unplug themselves accidently in the middle of a solo with a short cable).
Jun
30
comment Using bass strings on guitar
@Carl Witthoft, that's just the outer winding, the inside is gut or nylon (preferably gut, of course); I always used gut, it's been 20 years though... but here's some "Pirastro Gold's" for sale bing.com/shopping/… Great strings, I highly recommend them, I always found their tone much richer than nylon (quite a bit more expensive of course). But yes... electric steel core strings (electric guitar/bass/steel string acoustic) are a lot more tension than violin/viola/cello/double bass or... classical guitar
Jun
30
comment Using bass strings on guitar
The low Bb is 58.25 Hz not 116.5 Hz
Jun
30
answered Using bass strings on guitar
Jun
30
comment Reduce a tube amp power or volume
Is it to late to trade for one of their "Bugera Magician-Infinium Amps?" bugera-amps.com/en/products/MAGICIAN-INFINIUM.aspx I notice they're Multi-class (triode class A being less watts), and also have a built in "Varipower" (1W - 85W output), I don't know if it's a traditional power soak like a Hot Plate, or more like that company up in Canada (can't remember the name off-hand); I just remember looking at some schematics that seemed different and allowed a post power-tube section output adjustment (not an attenuator, I think it was some sort of current adjustment).
Jun
24
answered How to prevent high pitch feedback when palm muting
Jun
24
comment How to modify Trace-Elliot Velocette amp to make it more suitable for use with bass?
There are other variables at play here as well, the grid leak resistor (I assume it's a 1meg connected from ground to input grid on both halves of a 12ax7... not that I could tell by the schematic), anyways, raising that and or making the coupling caps (.022uF probably) bigger will increase your bass response. You'll probably still be limited by a non-full-range traditional C-core output transformer, and while I'm not familiar with this amp at all... when there's a speaker in the schematic, I'd guess it's a combo, so you probably don't have much bass response from the speaker either.
Jun
24
answered Acoustic guitar: How to stop right index finger nail from wearing away?
Jun
24
comment What is the Standard Frequency Response for Electric Keyboard?
But you're right, a keyboard amp will never cut it, but that's the basic gist of his question (and your answer); if he's looking for a great keyboard sound, he needs to move up to using a full-range P.A. system to get the performance he needs. Of course it's costlier, more pieces of gear, more to move, more to break, but that's just the way it is with just about anything right? Imagine he had to move a 9' grand around with him every time he played out, it's all a cost vs. performance ratio.
Jun
24
comment What is the Standard Frequency Response for Electric Keyboard?
One of the coolest things I've ever recorded was a Theremin played down to below 20Hz and then a slow rise back up again, you could clearly hear the shift out of range and watch the voice coil move in/out, really cool sounding, but unless you're referring to inaudible physical vibrations, there just isn't below around 20Hz, I like having the frequency range down there... like I said 20Hz sounds better if the equipment can extend, as I mentioned, if the specs say 20Hz-20KHz, it means the response is down 3dB at those points already, if you cut it off with a cap, you introduce phase anomalies.
Jun
24
comment What is the Standard Frequency Response for Electric Keyboard?
The generally accepted standard range of audible frequencies is 20 to 20,000 Hz, although the range of frequencies individuals hear is greatly influenced by environmental factors. Frequencies below 20 Hz are generally felt rather than heard, assuming the amplitude of the vibration is great enough. Wiki, I've played around with oscillators, and been in the room with large pipe organs as well, at a certain point (right around 20Hz) it just becomes an odd "clicking" noise as the voice coil moves, or a physical vibration (pipe organ), I've tried.
Jun
24
comment What is the Standard Frequency Response for Electric Keyboard?
That's the first/only time I've seen 12hz at the bottom end, I do ascribe to extending bass response lower than the 20Hz threshold of human hearing, purely because hard analogue filtering right at 20Hz will cause phase discrepancies in higher (audible) ranges. So while I design equipment to go down to 12Hz, it's not to hear 12Hz (you can watch the sub-woofer cone move in and out if you want to though, it's pretty cool); it's so that the 20Hz I can hear sounds tight and clean. There's a lot of confusion about this out there, note that frequency numbers without references are the -3dB points.