423 reputation
26
bio website udacity.com
location Redwood City, CA
age 41
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Jun 12 '13 at 20:28

I'm a software engineer with interests in backend systems, programming languages, and music. I currently work at Udacity, where I am working to help revolutionize the world of online education!


Jun
13
awarded  Yearling
Apr
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
13
awarded  Yearling
Feb
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
12
revised Zedd - Spectrum arpeggio fingering help?
Format the list as a list to make it clearer.
Jan
12
comment Zedd - Spectrum arpeggio fingering help?
Note that this phrase is not marked legato in the music. I like this fingering the best too, having tried them out.
Jan
12
suggested suggested edit on Zedd - Spectrum arpeggio fingering help?
Jan
12
comment Does the bass note in a “slash” chord really have an associated interval?
I generally wouldn't write it with a diminished 4th, nor have I seen that in practice. Context will usually make it obvious if the chord is incorrectly notated, but in the absence of context I don't think you can conclude the chord is incorrectly named.
Jan
11
comment Does the bass note in a “slash” chord really have an associated interval?
It's not semantics, because it's not a minor triad either. The chord E - G - G# - B is simply not a triad. Unless the asker read it wrong and the chord was really Em/G or e/G, but that would have been a different question.
Jan
9
comment Common names for sections of a piece of music
+1 for the breakdown. I suppose riff 3 could also be thought of as an extension or "cadence" for riff 2, since it pops up again to close the piece...
Jan
9
comment Does the bass note in a “slash” chord really have an associated interval?
Yes, this would be a simple first-inversion triad if the note were G♯, and it is common in practice for the slash notation to indicate first or second inversions of a triad to be played by the bass. But G natural is not part of the E major triad, so I'd say that calling it a first inversion in this case is misleading.
Jan
7
revised Does the bass note in a “slash” chord really have an associated interval?
added 50 characters in body
Jan
7
revised Does the bass note in a “slash” chord really have an associated interval?
added 991 characters in body
Jan
7
comment Does the bass note in a “slash” chord really have an associated interval?
Updated answer to include some of this explanation.
Jan
7
revised Does the bass note in a “slash” chord really have an associated interval?
added 991 characters in body
Jan
7
comment Does the bass note in a “slash” chord really have an associated interval?
Depends on what you plan to use the intervals/spelling for; it's not really a software problem since software is happy to do it whichever way you want! If you were to give an interval name, #2 (aka #9) and b3 are usually considered enharmonic, and you use the note name as your guide. If your root is E, and the note name is some sort of G, and you should call it some sort of 3. If the note name is based on F, you would call it some sort of 2 or 9. 9 is traditional when describing chords with triadic extensions, but for a slash bass I think I might just stick with the 2.
Jan
5
comment Can a song in one key contain major chords that are not in the key? Or does that change the key?
It is quite common in rock music to find bIII, bVI, and bVII chords (where b="flat") as major parts of a progression, and yes, they're borrowed from the parallel minor key if you want to think of them that way. I associate them with harmonic innovations that entered rock in the 60s, though, not so much with a direct lineage from blues. I'd be curious to see old blues examples that do that.
Jan
5
comment Name for music that imitates speech
I've seen many kinds of imitation in music; imitating human speech is just one kind. (Look up some Renaissance bird songs for more peculiar examples of imitation). I think they're just called imitation! My favorite example is Steve Vai's intro to "The Audience is Listening." :-)
Jan
5
awarded  Editor
Jan
5
revised Does the bass note in a “slash” chord really have an associated interval?
added 192 characters in body