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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 9 votes cast
Nov
30
comment Is 440hz always perceived as the same note no matter the vibrating medium, athmosphere and environment?
Does it change anything for your ears reference frame if there is a Doppler effect or not?
Nov
30
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
30
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
30
comment Is 440hz always perceived as the same note no matter the vibrating medium, athmosphere and environment?
@CarlWitthoft : Math is good. Always.
Nov
30
awarded  Scholar
Nov
30
accepted Is 440hz always perceived as the same note no matter the vibrating medium, athmosphere and environment?
Nov
30
comment Is 440hz always perceived as the same note no matter the vibrating medium, athmosphere and environment?
This confirms my own hypothesis (what matters is the frequency that drives the ear drum). I marked the question as answered and gave it an upvote. Adding some source and quotes would be nice to have though.
Nov
30
comment Is 440hz always perceived as the same note no matter the vibrating medium, athmosphere and environment?
440Hz = A was implicit in my question
Nov
29
awarded  Student
Nov
29
asked Is 440hz always perceived as the same note no matter the vibrating medium, athmosphere and environment?
Nov
20
awarded  Yearling
May
1
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
23
awarded  Yearling
Nov
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
28
awarded  Yearling
Aug
9
awarded  Commentator
Aug
9
comment What note(s) are a diminished 3rd above D-flat?
@Luke: If a comment is wrong please answer in the correct question/thread and not in this one.
Aug
9
comment What is the name of the interval Db - D#?
If you get a diminshed 3rd wrong and only count half steps you end up with the sound of a major second. @Stephen Hazel: That is what I meant with the "/" in the question is wrong because major second is not diminished third, even-though under special circumstances they sound the same. Also, to correct your comment, A dimished third is not the same as the minor one. It is one step further. C-E is major C-Eb is minor C-Ebb is diminished and may sound like C-D. Leave the tuning aside, this is only remotely connected to tuning. It is orthography.
Aug
8
comment What is the name of the interval Db - D#?
He wrote "diminished third", not minor. What is wrong is the "/". Those are different kind of intervals. If you leave out any other parameter, like volume and 'timbre', on a piano or similar tuned instrument the resulting sound is indeed the same. But this is never the case. Even on a piano, with its equal tuning, interpreters and analyst react different to an Eb than to a D#. These two notes have two different functions and the interpreter knows the difference and plays them different, with whatever possibilities his/her instrument has.
Aug
8
answered What is the name of the interval Db - D#?