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bio website nilsgey.de
location Cologne
age
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Jul 19 at 21:50

Aug
9
comment What note(s) are a diminished 3rd above D-flat?
@Luke: If a comment is wrong please answer in the correct question/thread and not in this one.
Aug
9
comment What is the name of the interval Db - D#?
If you get a diminshed 3rd wrong and only count half steps you end up with the sound of a major second. @Stephen Hazel: That is what I meant with the "/" in the question is wrong because major second is not diminished third, even-though under special circumstances they sound the same. Also, to correct your comment, A dimished third is not the same as the minor one. It is one step further. C-E is major C-Eb is minor C-Ebb is diminished and may sound like C-D. Leave the tuning aside, this is only remotely connected to tuning. It is orthography.
Aug
8
comment What is the name of the interval Db - D#?
He wrote "diminished third", not minor. What is wrong is the "/". Those are different kind of intervals. If you leave out any other parameter, like volume and 'timbre', on a piano or similar tuned instrument the resulting sound is indeed the same. But this is never the case. Even on a piano, with its equal tuning, interpreters and analyst react different to an Eb than to a D#. These two notes have two different functions and the interpreter knows the difference and plays them different, with whatever possibilities his/her instrument has.
Jul
8
comment What are some interesting ways notes and chords are spelled in cultures outside of the U.S.?
@UlfÅkerstedt: It is just a myth. Both were B in the beginning: One was the round b (B molle, B flat) and the other the squared b (B Durum, B/H). Durum is our natural sign. Germanys Organ tablature was based on the alphabet and they substituted Durum with an "h" because it looks similar. It was a conscious substitution to be compatible with standard printing machines. Since the tablature was so important this convention spread further. It is the same effect you can see if someone substitutes the German ß with a B because they don't have ß on their Keyboad and take the closest thing.
Jul
6
comment Is there a proper musical term for a piece's “roadmap”?
Sonata Form was just an example because it is so common. I could have said "Verse Refrain Verse Bridge Refrain" instead. And if you second Form then please upvote :)
Jul
5
comment How does one write any melody that he/she hums/pops-into-his-head?
So was this the answer or do you need more/a different kind of information? I ask because I don't see the answered icon here.
Jul
1
comment How does one write any melody that he/she hums/pops-into-his-head?
I see, Tracker. Well of course you can write in word notation. The principle is the same. Define/Sing one root-note(tonic), write all notes down next to each other, point randomly at one and sing it. I suggested normal notation because it enables you to write the duration/rhythm of a note with the symbol itself. You save a lots of space (on paper) when writing down single voice melodies and you don't need the layout to define the duration. Laborejo is for pure western notation only. It helps you as much as any other notation editor in its current development state.
Jun
28
comment Why is the note name “a” not on any important scale position?
Now we have something to work with. When and what music had "A" as historically significant scale? Forget the minor and major. This has absolutely nothing to do with how the scale is or is named. Just any scale will do as long it began historically with A and had significance. And with significance I mean "THE significane" which lead to today naming.
Jun
28
comment Why is the note name “a” not on any important scale position?
This was not a performance nor transposition question.