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Mar
28
reviewed No Action Needed What guitar tunings allow many chords without fretting between “live” strings
Mar
27
revised Sharps vs Flats - Formula to determine correct sharp and flat notes in a scale
added 13 characters in body
Mar
25
revised Sharps vs Flats - Formula to determine correct sharp and flat notes in a scale
replaced b's with HTML code for flat symbol: ♭
Mar
25
revised Sharps vs Flats - Formula to determine correct sharp and flat notes in a scale
second example
Mar
25
answered Sharps vs Flats - Formula to determine correct sharp and flat notes in a scale
Mar
23
reviewed No Action Needed Tips for how to stay calm before a concert
Mar
23
reviewed Leave Open How to play a G-chord?
Mar
23
comment How to play a G-chord?
Which G chord? Open, barred etc?
Mar
23
comment Classical examples of a 'fifth voice' or 'ghost soprano'
@jjmusicnotes This should probably be moved to chat -- this is my understanding of what is going on: combination tones do not exist /in the air/ (or more generally as any kind of mechanical oscillation). What is going on is that the pattern-matching mechanisms in the ear & brain detect 2f (and it's overtones -- this is the octave avbove) and 3f (and its overtones, this is one fifth above the 2f pipe) with the net result that the listener subjectively perceives that the pitch of that sound is 1f. This also underlys the way that church bells are tuned.
Mar
20
comment Classical examples of a 'fifth voice' or 'ghost soprano'
@jjmusicnotes here's a nice discussion of it: pykett.org.uk/resultantbass.htm#Introduction albeit with electronic organs. I might have an appropriate reference at home.
Mar
19
comment Classical examples of a 'fifth voice' or 'ghost soprano'
Your description of combination tones for pipe organs is wrong -- it's two pipes at different pitches (usually a note and a fifth above), and thus different lengths, to produce the effect of a lower pitch.
Mar
19
reviewed Looks OK Is there a “standard” or “typical” drum kit layout?
Mar
19
revised Is “pattern-based” playing specific to instruments or tradition?
added 103 characters in body
Mar
19
revised Is “pattern-based” playing specific to instruments or tradition?
added 103 characters in body
Mar
19
comment Is “pattern-based” playing specific to instruments or tradition?
@DanDavis early classical, not 12 tone, sometimes a phrase/motif is repeated, transposed, but diatonically (Cmaj example: {c e g} => {d f a}) other times it is transposed chromatically (e.g. {c e g}=>{d f# a}) there's a term that distinguishes between these two.
Mar
19
revised Is “pattern-based” playing specific to instruments or tradition?
deleted 121 characters in body
Mar
19
revised Is “pattern-based” playing specific to instruments or tradition?
deleted 168 characters in body
Mar
19
comment Is “pattern-based” playing specific to instruments or tradition?
There's the proper music term for "transposing a phrase, keeping the intervals exactly the same", but I can't remember what it is. Something like chromatic alteration maybe?
Mar
19
answered Is “pattern-based” playing specific to instruments or tradition?
Mar
19
reviewed Reviewed John Bonham's bass drum technique