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May
22
comment Singing the words to one song along with the music for another - what is this called?
@KilianFoth -- yes the musicological definition of parody en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parody#Music would seem to be the answer for "what is the name of this"
May
20
comment What is melodic inversion and how to do it?
@dennisdeems yes you are correct; my bad
May
20
comment What is melodic inversion and how to do it?
c d e g goes +2 +2 +2 semitones (c to d, d to e, e to g), so the inverted melody would go -2 -2 -2, so if you started on c, it would go: c b-flat, a-flat, g-flat (the inverted melody could start on any note).
May
17
comment How does one choose the correct time signature to match the tempo and vice versa?
music.stackexchange.com/questions/6786/…
May
12
comment One amplifier, two different instruments
What style of music?
May
10
comment Why are pure tones depicted as sine waves?
@JIK do you have examples of these other periodic functions?
May
8
comment Ballroom music in today's music
Question is probably a better match for the "Music Fans" (beta) SE
Apr
25
comment What does it mean to play a note for half a second?
@thePetProjectProgrammer I never said 220Hz -- I pointed out the 220 oscillations to emphasize that there are still a large number of complete cycles even in one half of a second. The only time when you'll run into a problem is when the duration of the note is so short that it can't complete even a few of them.
Apr
25
comment What does it mean to play a note for half a second?
Since the ear effectively does frequency analysis an uncertainty relation applies en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourier_transform#Uncertainty_principle -- thus a very short short signal does not have a well defined frequency, rather is has a spread of frequencies.
Apr
25
comment What does it mean to play a note for half a second?
I guess that I learned a rule of thumb that is slightly more stringent than you.
Apr
24
comment What is the difference between sharp note & flat note?
In 5-limit just intonation A# is lower ( 976.5 cents) than B flat (1017.6 [2-fifths, then a minor sixth up], or 996.1 [two fourths up] ).
Apr
20
comment Scientific references to singing?
Fundamentals of Musical Acoustics A. H. Benade, 1976?
Apr
7
comment With respect to right hand guitar technique, what does it mean to not scoop?
music.stackexchange.com/questions/20637/what-is-a-flat-wrist -- I think that this is a similar idea in the context of bass guitar.
Mar
23
comment How to play a G-chord?
Which G chord? Open, barred etc?
Mar
23
comment Classical examples of a 'fifth voice' or 'ghost soprano'
@jjmusicnotes This should probably be moved to chat -- this is my understanding of what is going on: combination tones do not exist /in the air/ (or more generally as any kind of mechanical oscillation). What is going on is that the pattern-matching mechanisms in the ear & brain detect 2f (and it's overtones -- this is the octave avbove) and 3f (and its overtones, this is one fifth above the 2f pipe) with the net result that the listener subjectively perceives that the pitch of that sound is 1f. This also underlys the way that church bells are tuned.
Mar
20
comment Classical examples of a 'fifth voice' or 'ghost soprano'
@jjmusicnotes here's a nice discussion of it: pykett.org.uk/resultantbass.htm#Introduction albeit with electronic organs. I might have an appropriate reference at home.
Mar
19
comment Classical examples of a 'fifth voice' or 'ghost soprano'
Your description of combination tones for pipe organs is wrong -- it's two pipes at different pitches (usually a note and a fifth above), and thus different lengths, to produce the effect of a lower pitch.
Mar
19
comment Is “pattern-based” playing specific to instruments or tradition?
@DanDavis early classical, not 12 tone, sometimes a phrase/motif is repeated, transposed, but diatonically (Cmaj example: {c e g} => {d f a}) other times it is transposed chromatically (e.g. {c e g}=>{d f# a}) there's a term that distinguishes between these two.
Mar
19
comment Is “pattern-based” playing specific to instruments or tradition?
There's the proper music term for "transposing a phrase, keeping the intervals exactly the same", but I can't remember what it is. Something like chromatic alteration maybe?
Mar
19
comment John Bonham's bass drum technique
This is a "non-answer" -- i.e. your response is "there is no answer", which is dubious given the other high quality answers.